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Re: singers who had surgery?

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  • keppers79
    Thanks for the hint about searching for this and relating what you ve heard about the issue. Perhaps the difference won t matter much to me since I don t have
    Message 1 of 14 , Mar 1, 2010
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      Thanks for the hint about searching for this and relating what you've heard about the issue. Perhaps the difference won't matter much to me since I don't have a professional career. I just want to know what I might be getting into since my voice is dear to me.

      That is interesting how the medical profession said there was no difference, but then others sense this really might make a difference.

      --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "ceast36532" <ceast36532@...> wrote:
      >
      > This question has come up from time to time. Try searching for "sing" or "singer" in the archive, if you want to see some of them.
      >
      > One of the members who is a highly trained musician, not as a singer but as a violinist, found that her voice was lowered a bit. Others have reported some alterations up or down, and one trumpet player found that he had lost his embouchure, which was a great loss to him. That was some years ago, and he is no longer active on the board, best I know, so I haven't any idea whether he ever recovered any of it.
      >
      > After there had been a number of inquiries, I wrote to the American Orthodontic Association (I think that was the name of the group). They referred my question to a surgeon, and he replied that the surgery does not make a difference in the vocal qualities.
      >
      > As I couldn't carry a tune in the proverbial bucket, before or after, I can't give you an opinion. I have my preferences in opera singers (all-time favorite: the great Joan Sutherland). Others may have their own ideas. Airway pressure changes make sense to me. And I have been told by friends who are trained singers that even the braces can make a difference, for one anticipating an operatic career, which would lead me to think that surgery culd, too.
      >
      > Cammie
      >
      > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <cannondalerob@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Strange you asked that question, as I have been wondering the same thing myself. I wouldn't call myself a singer as I pretty much only sing in the car to good songs or at church. My airway was dramatically increased by my surgery due to sleep apena. I find my singings improved and I am less nasal. However, first few times I sang, I couldn't control my pitch that well. I am guessing the pressure is a bit different in my airway?
      > >
      > > Robert
      > >
      > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Just wondering if any singers have had surgery and if they found it changed the quality of their singing voice at all?
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • keppers79
      That s nice that you only saw improvement!!!
      Message 2 of 14 , Mar 1, 2010
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        That's nice that you only saw improvement!!!

        --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, margaret wilson <kjpmemw@...> wrote:
        >
        > I most definitely am not a singer but all I could do before surgery was croak when I sang, and that has vastly and mysteriously improved.  My speaking voice is less nasal, also.  I did not notice any difference in my ability to sing in tune, which is to say, it varied both before and after surgery :-) 
        >
        > --- On Sat, 2/27/10, Robert <cannondalerob@...> wrote:
        >
        > From: Robert <cannondalerob@...>
        > Subject: [Orthognathic Surgery Support ] Re: singers who had surgery?
        > To: orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Saturday, February 27, 2010, 9:39 PM
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        > Strange you asked that question, as I have been wondering the same thing myself. I wouldn't call myself a singer as I pretty much only sing in the car to good songs or at church. My airway was dramatically increased by my surgery due to sleep apena. I find my singings improved and I am less nasal. However, first few times I sang, I couldn't control my pitch that well. I am guessing the pressure is a bit different in my airway?
        >
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        > Robert
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        > --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@ ...> wrote:
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        > > Just wondering if any singers have had surgery and if they found it changed the quality of their singing voice at all?
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      • keppers79
        Interesting Margaret. Well deeper and lower seems to be more popular in our age (I m a soprano...but just my observation), so I guess that is only a gain.
        Message 3 of 14 , Mar 1, 2010
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          Interesting Margaret. Well deeper and lower seems to be more popular in our age (I'm a soprano...but just my observation), so I guess that is only a gain.

          --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, margaret wilson <kjpmemw@...> wrote:
          >
          > Jjust for fun I taped my speaking voice and compared it to a pre-surgery recording, thinking that changes in my sinuses might be causing me to perceive that my voice was different when in fact it was not.   In comparing the two recordings (used the same text), my voice is definitely lower and deeper now.
          >
          > Margaret
          >
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          >
          >
          >  On Sat, 2/27/10, ceast36532 <ceast36532@...> wrote:
          >
          > From: ceast36532 <ceast36532@...>
          > Subject: [Orthognathic Surgery Support ] Re: singers who had surgery?
          > To: orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Saturday, February 27, 2010, 11:01 PM
          >
          >
          >
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          >  
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          > This question has come up from time to time. Try searching for "sing" or "singer" in the archive, if you want to see some of them.
          >
          >
          >
          > One of the members who is a highly trained musician, not as a singer but as a violinist, found that her voice was lowered a bit. Others have reported some alterations up or down, and one trumpet player found that he had lost his embouchure, which was a great loss to him. That was some years ago, and he is no longer active on the board, best I know, so I haven't any idea whether he ever recovered any of it.
          >
          >
          >
          > After there had been a number of inquiries, I wrote to the American Orthodontic Association (I think that was the name of the group). They referred my question to a surgeon, and he replied that the surgery does not make a difference in the vocal qualities.
          >
          >
          >
          > As I couldn't carry a tune in the proverbial bucket, before or after, I can't give you an opinion. I have my preferences in opera singers (all-time favorite: the great Joan Sutherland). Others may have their own ideas. Airway pressure changes make sense to me. And I have been told by friends who are trained singers that even the braces can make a difference, for one anticipating an operatic career, which would lead me to think that surgery culd, too.
          >
          >
          >
          > Cammie
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, "Robert" <cannondalerob@ ...> wrote:
          >
          > >
          >
          > > Strange you asked that question, as I have been wondering the same thing myself. I wouldn't call myself a singer as I pretty much only sing in the car to good songs or at church. My airway was dramatically increased by my surgery due to sleep apena. I find my singings improved and I am less nasal. However, first few times I sang, I couldn't control my pitch that well. I am guessing the pressure is a bit different in my airway?
          >
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          > > Robert
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          > > --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@ > wrote:
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          > > > Just wondering if any singers have had surgery and if they found it changed the quality of their singing voice at all?
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        • margaret wilson
          It seems odd that an operation which can so impact your breath and sinuses would not have some impact on the mechanics of singing and chest and head voice
          Message 4 of 14 , Mar 1, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            It seems odd that an operation which can so impact your breath and sinuses would not have some impact on the mechanics of singing and chest and head voice production.  Maybe the surgeon meant that it wouldn't negatively impact your voice, which would make more sense to me.  Do you have a voice coach to whom you could explain the surgery you are having and ask what impact it might have on your voice?

            As for my experiment, I didn't have very scientific controls. LOL.  I recorded on two different machines and it's possible that the recording speed on one was faster than on the other, thus making my voice higher.  I'd never make it as a scientist.

            How is your insurance battle coming along?

            Margaret


            --- On Mon, 3/1/10, keppers79 <kep-at-home@...> wrote:

            From: keppers79 <kep-at-home@...>
            Subject: [Orthognathic Surgery Support ] Re: singers who had surgery?
            To: orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, March 1, 2010, 8:52 AM







             









            Thanks for the hint about searching for this and relating what you've heard about the issue. Perhaps the difference won't matter much to me since I don't have a professional career. I just want to know what I might be getting into since my voice is dear to me.



            That is interesting how the medical profession said there was no difference, but then others sense this really might make a difference.



            --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, "ceast36532" <ceast36532@ ...> wrote:

            >

            > This question has come up from time to time. Try searching for "sing" or "singer" in the archive, if you want to see some of them.

            >

            > One of the members who is a highly trained musician, not as a singer but as a violinist, found that her voice was lowered a bit. Others have reported some alterations up or down, and one trumpet player found that he had lost his embouchure, which was a great loss to him. That was some years ago, and he is no longer active on the board, best I know, so I haven't any idea whether he ever recovered any of it.

            >

            > After there had been a number of inquiries, I wrote to the American Orthodontic Association (I think that was the name of the group). They referred my question to a surgeon, and he replied that the surgery does not make a difference in the vocal qualities.

            >

            > As I couldn't carry a tune in the proverbial bucket, before or after, I can't give you an opinion. I have my preferences in opera singers (all-time favorite: the great Joan Sutherland). Others may have their own ideas. Airway pressure changes make sense to me. And I have been told by friends who are trained singers that even the braces can make a difference, for one anticipating an operatic career, which would lead me to think that surgery culd, too.

            >

            > Cammie

            >

            > --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, "Robert" <cannondalerob@ > wrote:

            > >

            > > Strange you asked that question, as I have been wondering the same thing myself. I wouldn't call myself a singer as I pretty much only sing in the car to good songs or at church. My airway was dramatically increased by my surgery due to sleep apena. I find my singings improved and I am less nasal. However, first few times I sang, I couldn't control my pitch that well. I am guessing the pressure is a bit different in my airway?

            > >

            > > Robert

            > >

            > > --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@ > wrote:

            > > >

            > > > Just wondering if any singers have had surgery and if they found it changed the quality of their singing voice at all?

            > > >

            > >

            >

























            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Heidi Fink
            I wasn t a very good singer before my surgery and I think that my voice sounds just the same. However, that doesn t keep me from singing! (My poor family!)
            Message 5 of 14 , Mar 1, 2010
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              I wasn't a very good singer before my surgery and I think that my voice sounds just the same. However, that doesn't keep me from singing! (My poor family!)

              --- On Mon, 3/1/10, keppers79 <kep-at-home@...> wrote:


              From: keppers79 <kep-at-home@...>
              Subject: [Orthognathic Surgery Support ] Re: singers who had surgery?
              To: orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Monday, March 1, 2010, 8:53 AM


               



              That's nice that you only saw improvement! !!

              --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, margaret wilson <kjpmemw@... > wrote:
              >
              > I most definitely am not a singer but all I could do before surgery was croak when I sang, and that has vastly and mysteriously improved.  My speaking voice is less nasal, also.  I did not notice any difference in my ability to sing in tune, which is to say, it varied both before and after surgery :-) 
              >
              > --- On Sat, 2/27/10, Robert <cannondalerob@ ...> wrote:
              >
              > From: Robert <cannondalerob@ ...>
              > Subject: [Orthognathic Surgery Support ] Re: singers who had surgery?
              > To: orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com
              > Date: Saturday, February 27, 2010, 9:39 PM
              >
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              > Strange you asked that question, as I have been wondering the same thing myself. I wouldn't call myself a singer as I pretty much only sing in the car to good songs or at church. My airway was dramatically increased by my surgery due to sleep apena. I find my singings improved and I am less nasal. However, first few times I sang, I couldn't control my pitch that well. I am guessing the pressure is a bit different in my airway?
              >
              >
              >
              > Robert
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              > --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@ ...> wrote:
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              > > Just wondering if any singers have had surgery and if they found it changed the quality of their singing voice at all?
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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • keppers79
              Good point Margaret. No, I m not taking lessons right now unfortunately. Maybe I ll think about writing one of the professors I knew in college? The insurance
              Message 6 of 14 , Mar 2, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                Good point Margaret.

                No, I'm not taking lessons right now unfortunately. Maybe I'll think about writing one of the professors I knew in college?

                The insurance battle is unsettled...still a lot of unknowns...waiting to hear back from my doctor's office and waiting to hear back from customer service for the insurance company. I mean I'm "approved", and my doctor is approved for "in network" even though he's technically not. I'm just worried what kind of back billing I might receive from the doctor's office after the surgery...and whether all the loopholes are closed for the insurance changing their mind in some way.

                --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, margaret wilson <kjpmemw@...> wrote:
                >
                > It seems odd that an operation which can so impact your breath and sinuses would not have some impact on the mechanics of singing and chest and head voice production.  Maybe the surgeon meant that it wouldn't negatively impact your voice, which would make more sense to me.  Do you have a voice coach to whom you could explain the surgery you are having and ask what impact it might have on your voice?
                >
                > As for my experiment, I didn't have very scientific controls. LOL.  I recorded on two different machines and it's possible that the recording speed on one was faster than on the other, thus making my voice higher.  I'd never make it as a scientist.
                >
                > How is your insurance battle coming along?
                >
                > Margaret
                >
                >
                > --- On Mon, 3/1/10, keppers79 <kep-at-home@...> wrote:
                >
                > From: keppers79 <kep-at-home@...>
                > Subject: [Orthognathic Surgery Support ] Re: singers who had surgery?
                > To: orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com
                > Date: Monday, March 1, 2010, 8:52 AM
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >  
                >
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                >
                >
                >
                >
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                >
                >
                > Thanks for the hint about searching for this and relating what you've heard about the issue. Perhaps the difference won't matter much to me since I don't have a professional career. I just want to know what I might be getting into since my voice is dear to me.
                >
                >
                >
                > That is interesting how the medical profession said there was no difference, but then others sense this really might make a difference.
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, "ceast36532" <ceast36532@ ...> wrote:
                >
                > >
                >
                > > This question has come up from time to time. Try searching for "sing" or "singer" in the archive, if you want to see some of them.
                >
                > >
                >
                > > One of the members who is a highly trained musician, not as a singer but as a violinist, found that her voice was lowered a bit. Others have reported some alterations up or down, and one trumpet player found that he had lost his embouchure, which was a great loss to him. That was some years ago, and he is no longer active on the board, best I know, so I haven't any idea whether he ever recovered any of it.
                >
                > >
                >
                > > After there had been a number of inquiries, I wrote to the American Orthodontic Association (I think that was the name of the group). They referred my question to a surgeon, and he replied that the surgery does not make a difference in the vocal qualities.
                >
                > >
                >
                > > As I couldn't carry a tune in the proverbial bucket, before or after, I can't give you an opinion. I have my preferences in opera singers (all-time favorite: the great Joan Sutherland). Others may have their own ideas. Airway pressure changes make sense to me. And I have been told by friends who are trained singers that even the braces can make a difference, for one anticipating an operatic career, which would lead me to think that surgery culd, too.
                >
                > >
                >
                > > Cammie
                >
                > >
                >
                > > --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, "Robert" <cannondalerob@ > wrote:
                >
                > > >
                >
                > > > Strange you asked that question, as I have been wondering the same thing myself. I wouldn't call myself a singer as I pretty much only sing in the car to good songs or at church. My airway was dramatically increased by my surgery due to sleep apena. I find my singings improved and I am less nasal. However, first few times I sang, I couldn't control my pitch that well. I am guessing the pressure is a bit different in my airway?
                >
                > > >
                >
                > > > Robert
                >
                > > >
                >
                > > > --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@ > wrote:
                >
                > > > >
                >
                > > > > Just wondering if any singers have had surgery and if they found it changed the quality of their singing voice at all?
                >
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              • keppers79
                Margaret, I wrote one of my old professors who asked her colleague (who has a master s in voice and a doctorate in speech pathology). She said, There s
                Message 7 of 14 , Mar 3, 2010
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                  Margaret,

                  I wrote one of my old professors who asked her colleague (who has a master's in voice and a doctorate in speech pathology). She said, "There's really little chance that the change in the shape/size of her oral cavity will have any effect on her voice. This is major surgery. There is always potential for damaging the vocal folds with intubation during surgery. That would be the primary concern for permanent negative results. Otherwise, she could be correct that the change could help relieve some tensions but she would probably need some theraputic intervention to achieve that - good speech pathologist!" (The part about the tension is in reference to a comment I made wondering if the surgery will indirectly relieve some of the tension I have at times experienced when I sing).

                  --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Good point Margaret.
                  >
                  > No, I'm not taking lessons right now unfortunately. Maybe I'll think about writing one of the professors I knew in college?
                  >
                  > The insurance battle is unsettled...still a lot of unknowns...waiting to hear back from my doctor's office and waiting to hear back from customer service for the insurance company. I mean I'm "approved", and my doctor is approved for "in network" even though he's technically not. I'm just worried what kind of back billing I might receive from the doctor's office after the surgery...and whether all the loopholes are closed for the insurance changing their mind in some way.
                  >
                  > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, margaret wilson <kjpmemw@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > It seems odd that an operation which can so impact your breath and sinuses would not have some impact on the mechanics of singing and chest and head voice production.  Maybe the surgeon meant that it wouldn't negatively impact your voice, which would make more sense to me.  Do you have a voice coach to whom you could explain the surgery you are having and ask what impact it might have on your voice?
                  > >
                  > > As for my experiment, I didn't have very scientific controls. LOL.  I recorded on two different machines and it's possible that the recording speed on one was faster than on the other, thus making my voice higher.  I'd never make it as a scientist.
                  > >
                  > > How is your insurance battle coming along?
                  > >
                  > > Margaret
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- On Mon, 3/1/10, keppers79 <kep-at-home@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > From: keppers79 <kep-at-home@>
                  > > Subject: [Orthognathic Surgery Support ] Re: singers who had surgery?
                  > > To: orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com
                  > > Date: Monday, March 1, 2010, 8:52 AM
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
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                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >  
                  > >
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                  > >
                  > > Thanks for the hint about searching for this and relating what you've heard about the issue. Perhaps the difference won't matter much to me since I don't have a professional career. I just want to know what I might be getting into since my voice is dear to me.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > That is interesting how the medical profession said there was no difference, but then others sense this really might make a difference.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, "ceast36532" <ceast36532@ ...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > > > This question has come up from time to time. Try searching for "sing" or "singer" in the archive, if you want to see some of them.
                  > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > > > One of the members who is a highly trained musician, not as a singer but as a violinist, found that her voice was lowered a bit. Others have reported some alterations up or down, and one trumpet player found that he had lost his embouchure, which was a great loss to him. That was some years ago, and he is no longer active on the board, best I know, so I haven't any idea whether he ever recovered any of it.
                  > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > > > After there had been a number of inquiries, I wrote to the American Orthodontic Association (I think that was the name of the group). They referred my question to a surgeon, and he replied that the surgery does not make a difference in the vocal qualities.
                  > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > > > As I couldn't carry a tune in the proverbial bucket, before or after, I can't give you an opinion. I have my preferences in opera singers (all-time favorite: the great Joan Sutherland). Others may have their own ideas. Airway pressure changes make sense to me. And I have been told by friends who are trained singers that even the braces can make a difference, for one anticipating an operatic career, which would lead me to think that surgery culd, too.
                  > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > > > Cammie
                  > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > > > --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, "Robert" <cannondalerob@ > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > >
                  > >
                  > > > > Strange you asked that question, as I have been wondering the same thing myself. I wouldn't call myself a singer as I pretty much only sing in the car to good songs or at church. My airway was dramatically increased by my surgery due to sleep apena. I find my singings improved and I am less nasal. However, first few times I sang, I couldn't control my pitch that well. I am guessing the pressure is a bit different in my airway?
                  > >
                  > > > >
                  > >
                  > > > > Robert
                  > >
                  > > > >
                  > >
                  > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@ > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > > >
                  > >
                  > > > > > Just wondering if any singers have had surgery and if they found it changed the quality of their singing voice at all?
                  > >
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                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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                • margaret wilson
                  Thanks for going to the horse s mouth, so to speak.  Although intubation damage did happen to someone on this list about a month ago, surely such an
                  Message 8 of 14 , Mar 3, 2010
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Thanks for going to the horse's mouth, so to speak.  Although intubation damage did happen to someone on this list about a month ago, surely such an occurrence is extremely rare!

                    Margaret

                    --- On Wed, 3/3/10, keppers79 <kep-at-home@...> wrote:

                    From: keppers79 <kep-at-home@...>
                    Subject: [Orthognathic Surgery Support ] answer about effect on voice
                    To: orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Wednesday, March 3, 2010, 9:21 AM







                     









                    Margaret,



                    I wrote one of my old professors who asked her colleague (who has a master's in voice and a doctorate in speech pathology). She said, "There's really little chance that the change in the shape/size of her oral cavity will have any effect on her voice. This is major surgery. There is always potential for damaging the vocal folds with intubation during surgery. That would be the primary concern for permanent negative results. Otherwise, she could be correct that the change could help relieve some tensions but she would probably need some theraputic intervention to achieve that - good speech pathologist! " (The part about the tension is in reference to a comment I made wondering if the surgery will indirectly relieve some of the tension I have at times experienced when I sing).



                    --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@ ...> wrote:

                    >

                    > Good point Margaret.

                    >

                    > No, I'm not taking lessons right now unfortunately. Maybe I'll think about writing one of the professors I knew in college?

                    >

                    > The insurance battle is unsettled... still a lot of unknowns...waiting to hear back from my doctor's office and waiting to hear back from customer service for the insurance company. I mean I'm "approved", and my doctor is approved for "in network" even though he's technically not. I'm just worried what kind of back billing I might receive from the doctor's office after the surgery...and whether all the loopholes are closed for the insurance changing their mind in some way.

                    >

                    > --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, margaret wilson <kjpmemw@> wrote:

                    > >

                    > > It seems odd that an operation which can so impact your breath and sinuses would not have some impact on the mechanics of singing and chest and head voice production.  Maybe the surgeon meant that it wouldn't negatively impact your voice, which would make more sense to me.  Do you have a voice coach to whom you could explain the surgery you are having and ask what impact it might have on your voice?

                    > >

                    > > As for my experiment, I didn't have very scientific controls. LOL.  I recorded on two different machines and it's possible that the recording speed on one was faster than on the other, thus making my voice higher.  I'd never make it as a scientist.

                    > >

                    > > How is your insurance battle coming along?

                    > >

                    > > Margaret

                    > >

                    > >

                    > > --- On Mon, 3/1/10, keppers79 <kep-at-home@ > wrote:

                    > >

                    > > From: keppers79 <kep-at-home@ >

                    > > Subject: [Orthognathic Surgery Support ] Re: singers who had surgery?

                    > > To: orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com

                    > > Date: Monday, March 1, 2010, 8:52 AM

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                    > > Thanks for the hint about searching for this and relating what you've heard about the issue. Perhaps the difference won't matter much to me since I don't have a professional career. I just want to know what I might be getting into since my voice is dear to me.

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                    > > That is interesting how the medical profession said there was no difference, but then others sense this really might make a difference.

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                    > >

                    > > --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, "ceast36532" <ceast36532@ ...> wrote:

                    > >

                    > > >

                    > >

                    > > > This question has come up from time to time. Try searching for "sing" or "singer" in the archive, if you want to see some of them.

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                    > > > One of the members who is a highly trained musician, not as a singer but as a violinist, found that her voice was lowered a bit. Others have reported some alterations up or down, and one trumpet player found that he had lost his embouchure, which was a great loss to him. That was some years ago, and he is no longer active on the board, best I know, so I haven't any idea whether he ever recovered any of it.

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                    > > > After there had been a number of inquiries, I wrote to the American Orthodontic Association (I think that was the name of the group). They referred my question to a surgeon, and he replied that the surgery does not make a difference in the vocal qualities.

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                    > > > As I couldn't carry a tune in the proverbial bucket, before or after, I can't give you an opinion. I have my preferences in opera singers (all-time favorite: the great Joan Sutherland). Others may have their own ideas. Airway pressure changes make sense to me. And I have been told by friends who are trained singers that even the braces can make a difference, for one anticipating an operatic career, which would lead me to think that surgery culd, too.

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                    > > > Cammie

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                    > > > --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, "Robert" <cannondalerob@ > wrote:

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                    > > > > Strange you asked that question, as I have been wondering the same thing myself. I wouldn't call myself a singer as I pretty much only sing in the car to good songs or at church. My airway was dramatically increased by my surgery due to sleep apena. I find my singings improved and I am less nasal. However, first few times I sang, I couldn't control my pitch that well. I am guessing the pressure is a bit different in my airway?

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                    > > > > Robert

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                    > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgery support@yahoogro ups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@ > wrote:

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                    > > > > > Just wondering if any singers have had surgery and if they found it changed the quality of their singing voice at all?

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