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Re: [orthodox-synod] Re: Iconography, was: a variety of other things

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  • Fr. Alexander Lebedeff
    ... Take a good look at the Odigitria of the Russian Diaspora-- the Kursk-Root Icon of the Mother of God. At the top you will see a beautiful icon of God the
    Message 1 of 25 , Mar 3, 2003
      Michael Nikitin wrote:


      >Wasn't it the Sto Glaviy Sobor in the Russian Church which explicitly
      >forbids depiction of icons of God the Father?


      Take a good look at the "Odigitria" of the Russian Diaspora-- the
      Kursk-Root Icon of the Mother of God.

      At the top you will see a beautiful icon of God the Father, added during
      the time of Ivan IV, long after the Stoglavyj Sobor.

      Should we throw out the Kursk-Root Icon as "heretical"?

      And, regarding the Council of the Hundred Chapters, I suggest that Michael
      reads its 31st Canon:

      "if anyone should not sign himself with two fingers, as Christ also, let
      him be accursed (anathema)."

      "Ashche kto ne znamenaetsya dvema persty, jakozhe i Khristos, da est'
      proklyat."

      How many fingers do **you** sign yourself with, Michael?

      If not two, then you are anathema and accursed.

      >

      With love in Christ,

      Prot. Alexander Lebedeff
    • antiquariu@aol.com
      In a message dated 3/3/2003 1:55:22 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... Hmmm... I guess those insensitive iconographers in the Holy Land should have paid more
      Message 2 of 25 , Mar 3, 2003
        In a message dated 3/3/2003 1:55:22 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        mikeniki@... writes:


        > Wasn't it the Sto Glaviy Sobor in the Russian Church which explicitly
        > forbids depiction of icons of God the Father? That icons can only
        > depict what human eye had seen and no one had seen God the Father. A
        > priests reads quietly prayers at liturgy, what do they say about God the
        > Father ?
        >

        Hmmm... I guess those insensitive iconographers in the Holy Land should have
        paid more attention to what a Russian Sobor would do several centuries
        later...

        Love,

        Vladimir Hindrichs


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Michael Nikitin
        You did not answear my question, Fr. Alexander, but took them personaly and started hitting me with a stick. Answer my question, please? Who is Vethiy Den mi
        Message 3 of 25 , Mar 4, 2003
          You did not answear my question, Fr. Alexander, but
          took them personaly and started hitting me with a
          stick.

          Answer my question, please?

          Who is "Vethiy Den'mi" that we sing on the holiday of
          Meeting of our Lord" I believe? Isn't it our Savior?


          Michael N.

          From: "Fr. Alexander Lebedeff" <lebedeff@...>
          Reply-To: orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com
          To: orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [orthodox-synod] Re: Iconography, was: a variety of other
          things
          Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 12:01:12 -0800

          Michael Nikitin wrote:

          >Wasn't it the Sto Glaviy Sobor in the Russian Church which explicitly
          >forbids depiction of icons of God the Father?

          Take a good look at the "Odigitria" of the Russian Diaspora-- the
          Kursk-Root Icon of the Mother of God.

          At the top you will see a beautiful icon of God the Father, added during
          the time of Ivan IV, long after the Stoglavyj Sobor.

          Should we throw out the Kursk-Root Icon as "heretical"?

          And, regarding the Council of the Hundred Chapters, I suggest that Michael
          reads its 31st Canon:

          "if anyone should not sign himself with two fingers, as Christ also, let
          him be accursed (anathema)."

          "Ashche kto ne znamenaetsya dvema persty, jakozhe i Khristos, da est'
          proklyat."

          How many fingers do **you** sign yourself with, Michael?

          If not two, then you are anathema and accursed.


          With love in Christ,

          Prot. Alexander Lebedeff

          _________________________________________________________________
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        • Joachim Wertz
          What about depicting angels in icons? Aside from the Book of Revelation where the visions are of different character, it seems that the angels were seen by the
          Message 4 of 25 , Mar 4, 2003
            What about depicting angels in icons? Aside from the Book of Revelation
            where the visions are of different character, it seems that the angels were
            seen by the human eye at least in the following cases: Raphael (Book of
            Tobias), Gabriel ( the Annunciation), when an angel appears to Joseph (2
            times, I think), when an angel appears to the shepherds, when an angel
            appeared to Zacharias in the Temple, when the angel appeared to the Myrrh
            Bearers, when an angel appeared to Abraham at the "sacrifice" of Isaac and
            at the Hospitality. Now since in these instances angels were seen by people
            awake, does this justify our depicting them in icons, individually as in the
            cases of Gabriel and Raphael, and generically in the cases where the
            Scriptures merely say "an angel"? Has the Archangel Michael ever been seen
            by "human eyes"? And what about Guardian Angels?

            In Christ,

            Joachim Wertz

            From: antiquariu@...
            Reply-To: orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 23:55:28 EST
            To: orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [orthodox-synod] Re: Iconography, was: a variety of other
            things


            In a message dated 3/3/2003 1:55:22 PM Eastern Standard Time,
            mikeniki@... writes:


            > Wasn't it the Sto Glaviy Sobor in the Russian Church which explicitly
            > forbids depiction of icons of God the Father? That icons can only
            > depict what human eye had seen and no one had seen God the Father. A
            > priests reads quietly prayers at liturgy, what do they say about God the
            > Father ?
            >

            Hmmm... I guess those insensitive iconographers in the Holy Land should
            have
            paid more attention to what a Russian Sobor would do several centuries
            later...

            Love,

            Vladimir Hindrichs


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • larry most
            GLORY TO JESUS CHRIST - GLORY TO HIM FOREVER Dear everyone talking about the icons, When I said that I kind of crigne when I see God the Father, depicted as
            Message 5 of 25 , Mar 4, 2003
              GLORY TO JESUS CHRIST - GLORY TO HIM FOREVER
              Dear everyone talking about the icons,
              When I said that I kind of "crigne" when I see God the Father, depicted as an old man with a triangular halo, that's all that I do, I just "chringe". I'm son offended or anything like that. We have a c ouple of icons, one that depicts the creation of the cosmos and the other shows God naming the animals and off to the side they show Christ (because He is God). I didn't mean to start a fire over this I was just making a comment. I do know that on the Roman Gospel that some times there is an icon of God the Father (as an old man). It was just a comment.
              Love in Christ,
              Sub-deacon Lawrence
              antiquariu@... wrote:In a message dated 3/3/2003 1:55:22 PM Eastern Standard Time,
              mikeniki@... writes:


              > Wasn't it the Sto Glaviy Sobor in the Russian Church which explicitly
              > forbids depiction of icons of God the Father? That icons can only
              > depict what human eye had seen and no one had seen God the Father. A
              > priests reads quietly prayers at liturgy, what do they say about God the
              > Father ?
              >

              Hmmm... I guess those insensitive iconographers in the Holy Land should have
              paid more attention to what a Russian Sobor would do several centuries
              later...

              Love,

              Vladimir Hindrichs


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Fr. Alexander Lebedeff
              ... I didn t see a question addressed to me--I believe you were asking Fr. Stefan something. But you did bring up the Council of the Hundred Chapters as an
              Message 6 of 25 , Mar 4, 2003
                >You did not answear my question, Fr. Alexander, but
                >took them personaly and started hitting me with a
                >stick.

                I didn't see a question addressed to me--I believe you were asking Fr.
                Stefan something.

                But you did bring up the Council of the Hundred Chapters as an authority,
                so I replied to that postion of your post.




                >Answer my question, please?
                >
                >Who is "Vethiy Den'mi" that we sing on the holiday of
                >Meeting of our Lord" I believe? Isn't it our Savior?

                Of course the "Ancient of Days" refers to Our Savior--the stikhiras of the
                Feast say "Today the Elder Symeon takes in his hands the Ancient of Days. . ."

                However, the original question was not about the Ancient of Days, but about
                depictions of God the Father in general.

                Stephen, too, is wrong here. Because on the Kursk-Root Icon, the Icon at
                the top is not labeled "Ancient of Days" and does not have the halo used on
                Icons of Christ--but it is clearly labeled "Gospod' Savaoth" and the halo
                is a double square halo (making it have eight points).

                There are iconic examples of the depiction of the Lord Sabaoth (as an old
                man) going back to before the 14th century in Russia.

                And--in the Church Abroad an icon of God the Father as an old man
                miraculously renewed itself in the Convent of the Vladimir Icon of the
                Mother of God in Shanghai, and was deeply venerated as a miracle-working
                icon by Metropolitan Philaret, St. John of Shanghai and the entire Church
                Abroad.



                With love in Christ,

                Prot. Alexander Lebedeff
              • antiquariu@aol.com
                In a message dated 3/4/2003 1:04:00 PM Eastern Standard Time, wertz@pcnet.com ... The Plot Thickens! Well, if you believe early Byzantine art, angels look
                Message 7 of 25 , Mar 4, 2003
                  In a message dated 3/4/2003 1:04:00 PM Eastern Standard Time, wertz@...
                  writes:


                  > What about depicting angels in icons? Aside from the Book of Revelation
                  > where the visions are of different character, it seems that the angels were
                  > seen by the human eye at least in the following cases: Raphael (Book of
                  > Tobias), Gabriel ( the Annunciation), when an angel appears to Joseph (2
                  > times, I think), when an angel appears to the shepherds, when an angel
                  > appeared to Zacharias in the Temple, when the angel appeared to the Myrrh
                  > Bearers, when an angel appeared to Abraham at the "sacrifice" of Isaac and
                  > at the Hospitality. Now since in these instances angels were seen by people
                  > awake, does this justify our depicting them in icons, individually as in
                  > the
                  > cases of Gabriel and Raphael, and generically in the cases where the
                  > Scriptures merely say "an angel"? Has the Archangel Michael ever been seen
                  > by "human eyes"? And what about Guardian Angels?
                  >

                  The Plot Thickens!

                  Well, if you believe early Byzantine art, angels look suspiciously like
                  Babylonian sphinxes -- for example, the seraphim. The notion of angels has
                  evolved over time -- the Pan-Semitic form continued the 'terrible seraph' of
                  Babylonian antiquity until well into the iconoclastic period. The warrior
                  males started appearing in about the 7th and 8th centuries, gradually
                  becoming sexless, and at least in western art with some greek overtones,
                  becoming females, reaching their artistic perfection in the PreRaphaelite
                  period in England. It's this form which is most pervasive in Western
                  Thought, at least outside of seminaries.

                  But then again, we haven't seen any burning bushes either, and I have several
                  of them on post StoGlav icons. And should Andrej Rublev have depicted the
                  oask of Mambre only, since we know that that was and is seeable?

                  I don't really care. I accept icons as a means of opening up my small mind
                  and heart, and looking into heaven. I find icons highly capable of putting
                  me into a prayerful state of mind (a la window into heaven). When I say my
                  prayers, I really don't debate whether St Luke did the prototype, and I have
                  no problem with the outpourings of faith that have given us three-armed
                  Madonnas, fly-fishing monks, dog-headed saints, warrior Ukies, triangular
                  halos, or any of a number of other symbolic devices, because they are
                  outpourings of faith, and despite the cringing on the part of some,
                  allegorical. Just because the state of the art had not advanced much beyong
                  flat portraiture doesn't mean all of our saints were flat, nor that those
                  that aren't are heretical. And speaking of things seen and unseen - have any
                  among us -- Pharisees included -- ever seen a halo, triangular or otherwise?
                  Sounds like an allegorical device to me, just to make sure we see that we are
                  in fact talking about something holy. So, Father, Son, Bird, or Rublevian
                  Visitation of Abraham - does it really matter if it fulfills not the StovGlav
                  functions, but some earlier one -- window into heaven and facilitator of a
                  prayerful state? Besides, when did we ever come up with the idea of temporal
                  infallibility? The StoGlav has already been overtaken by events on a number
                  of its theses, like triple Alleluias, washing, shaving, etc. I now
                  understand where the inspiration for some of our Russophiles comes from.

                  Love,

                  Vladimir Hindrichs


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • James Baglien
                  ... Churches the Ikon of God the Father, as an old man with a triangular halo. ... Cathedral the on the walls are depicted the Trinity as you pejoratively
                  Message 8 of 25 , Mar 5, 2003
                    --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, larry most wrote:
                    > Oh, I forgot, I sort of cringe when I see in some Orthodox
                    Churches the Ikon of God the Father, as an old man with a triangular
                    halo.

                    --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, StefanVPavlenko wrote:
                    > Have you ever been at Mar Sabba's outside Jerusalem. In their main
                    Cathedral the on the walls are depicted the Trinity as you
                    pejoratively describe.

                    --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, Michael Nikitin wrote:
                    > Wasn't it the Sto Glaviy Sobor in the Russian Church which
                    explicitly forbids depiction of icons of God the Father?

                    --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, Fr. Alexander Lebedeff wrote:
                    > Take a good look at the "Odigitria" of the Russian Diaspora-- the
                    Kursk-Root Icon of the Mother of God. At the top you will see a
                    beautiful icon of God the Father, added during the time of Ivan IV,
                    long after the Stoglavyj Sobor. Should we throw out the Kursk-Root
                    Icon as "heretical"?

                    --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, StephenATL <sbu@b...> wrote:
                    > I would beg to differ Father. He who is pictured is Christ, the
                    "Ancient of Days", not God the Father. The Church does strictly
                    forbid the depiction of God the Father in icons......... He who has
                    never been seen by any man, cannot be depicted in any image.

                    There are really *two* questions in this thread: 1) is the icon
                    prototype of God the Father portrayed as an old man desirable, and 2)
                    how should we regard old icons of this type, when we encounter them?

                    With respect to the first question, our parish had a recent
                    experience with the issue. Our east wall includes, at its apex,
                    Christ the Ancient of Days. When the design was first submitted for
                    review in Jordanville, this element received considerably scrutiny
                    to ensure that it was indeed *Christ* that was being depicted, not
                    the Father. Reference was made to a composition of this type (of
                    Christ) by Archbishop Alipy in a church in Cleveland, and Frs. Andrei
                    and Luke signed off. When shown the design, Bishop Kyrill expressed
                    the same concerns and question. Based on our experience, and
                    conversations with a number of iconographers in the ROCOR, I suspect
                    that someone wanting a contemporary composition of God the Father as
                    an old man in their church might have some difficultly finding a
                    willing iconographer and/or an episcopal blessing, both because of
                    the theological issues implicit in the prototype, and the potential
                    for stumbling sensitive parishioners.

                    That said, it is indisputable that icons of the prototype in question
                    have been around for a long time, and been the subjects of much
                    veneration (as have a number of icons written in a modernistic style,
                    that stream myrrh and are associated with miracles . . .). I think
                    that the second question was succinctly answered, in another context,
                    by St. John of SF, when he was asked about old icons written in an
                    egregiously Latinate style. His instuctions were something along the
                    lines of don't get any more like that, but don't stir up trouble by
                    crusading against such icons when they have enjoyed long veneration.

                    In IC XC,

                    Priest James Baglien
                  • for4z@aol.com
                    In a message dated 3/5/2003 2:34:03 PM Pacific Standard Time, ... Russia s main cathedral, the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow, has an enormous icon
                    Message 9 of 25 , Mar 6, 2003
                      In a message dated 3/5/2003 2:34:03 PM Pacific Standard Time,
                      jbaglien@... writes:
                      >
                      > --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, Michael Nikitin wrote:
                      > > Wasn't it the Sto Glaviy Sobor in the Russian Church which
                      > explicitly forbids depiction of icons of God the Father?
                      > ......
                      > I suspect that someone wanting a contemporary composition of God the
                      > Father as
                      > an old man in their church might have some difficultly finding a
                      > willing iconographer and/or an episcopal blessing, both because of
                      > the theological issues implicit in the prototype, and the potential
                      > for stumbling sensitive parishioners.
                      >



                      Russia's main cathedral, the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow, has
                      an enormous icon of the Lord God Sabaoth in the main dome, over 100 feet
                      wide, where God the Father is portrayed as an old man. Metropolitan St.
                      Philaret of Moscow played an integral part in helping to plan the Cathedral,
                      working closely with the architect Konstantine Ton, influencing such design
                      decisions as the octagonal chapel-like iconastasis and choosing the subjects
                      of the sculpture frieze on the cathedral's exterior. Furthermore, this
                      cathedral was built during the "Russian Renassiance," when Russian church
                      architecture, iconography, music, and ecclesiastical art were at their
                      height. Thus, if at one point depictions of God the Father as an old man
                      were outlawed in Russia, this later changed.

                      -Nick Zaharov
                      PS..In the 16th Century the Russian Church also banned and halted the
                      construction of "tent-style" churches, such as St. Basil's (Protection) on
                      Red Square. Despite this, our Church Abroad has a few examples of such
                      church types: Jordanville Cathedral and Transfiguration Cathedral in Los
                      Angeles, the construction of the latter still being unfinished........



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • for4z@aol.com
                      In a message dated 3/5/2003 2:34:03 PM Pacific Standard Time, ... Russia s main cathedral, the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow, has an enormous icon
                      Message 10 of 25 , Mar 6, 2003
                        In a message dated 3/5/2003 2:34:03 PM Pacific Standard Time,
                        jbaglien@... writes:
                        >
                        > --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, Michael Nikitin wrote:
                        > > Wasn't it the Sto Glaviy Sobor in the Russian Church which
                        > explicitly forbids depiction of icons of God the Father?
                        > ......
                        > I suspect that someone wanting a contemporary composition of God the
                        > Father as
                        > an old man in their church might have some difficultly finding a
                        > willing iconographer and/or an episcopal blessing, both because of
                        > the theological issues implicit in the prototype, and the potential
                        > for stumbling sensitive parishioners.
                        >



                        Russia's main cathedral, the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow, has
                        an enormous icon of the Lord God Sabaoth in the main dome, over 100 feet
                        wide, where God the Father is portrayed as an old man. Metropolitan St.
                        Philaret of Moscow played an integral part in helping to plan the Cathedral,
                        working closely with the architect Konstantine Ton, influencing such design
                        decisions as the octagonal chapel-like iconastasis and choosing the subjects
                        of the sculpture frieze on the cathedral's exterior. Furthermore, this
                        cathedral was built during the "Russian Renassiance," when Russian church
                        architecture, iconography, music, and ecclesiastical art were at their
                        height. Thus, if at one point depictions of God the Father as an old man
                        were outlawed in Russia, this later changed.

                        -Nick Zaharov
                        PS..In the 16th Century the Russian Church also banned and halted the
                        construction of "tent-style" churches, such as St. Basil's (Protection) on
                        Red Square. Despite this, our Church Abroad has a few examples of such
                        church types: Jordanville Cathedral and Transfiguration Cathedral in Los
                        Angeles, the construction of the latter still being unfinished........



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Kiril Bart
                        Fr. Alexander, you should know that icon of Theotokos of Kursk-Korenaya is only a small icon in a middle of an icon with blue cover that we all know. So,
                        Message 11 of 25 , Mar 6, 2003
                          Fr. Alexander, you should know that icon of Theotokos of Kursk-Korenaya is only a small icon in a middle of an icon with blue cover that we all know. So, borders had been added in a later times and image of God the Father are of a relatively new origin.
                          Subdeacon Kirill
                          "Fr. Alexander Lebedeff" <lebedeff@...> wrote:


                          >You did not answear my question, Fr. Alexander, but
                          >took them personaly and started hitting me with a
                          >stick.

                          I didn't see a question addressed to me--I believe you were asking Fr.
                          Stefan something.

                          But you did bring up the Council of the Hundred Chapters as an authority,
                          so I replied to that postion of your post.




                          >Answer my question, please?
                          >
                          >Who is "Vethiy Den'mi" that we sing on the holiday of
                          >Meeting of our Lord" I believe? Isn't it our Savior?

                          Of course the "Ancient of Days" refers to Our Savior--the stikhiras of the
                          Feast say "Today the Elder Symeon takes in his hands the Ancient of Days. . ."

                          However, the original question was not about the Ancient of Days, but about
                          depictions of God the Father in general.

                          Stephen, too, is wrong here. Because on the Kursk-Root Icon, the Icon at
                          the top is not labeled "Ancient of Days" and does not have the halo used on
                          Icons of Christ--but it is clearly labeled "Gospod' Savaoth" and the halo
                          is a double square halo (making it have eight points).

                          There are iconic examples of the depiction of the Lord Sabaoth (as an old
                          man) going back to before the 14th century in Russia.

                          And--in the Church Abroad an icon of God the Father as an old man
                          miraculously renewed itself in the Convent of the Vladimir Icon of the
                          Mother of God in Shanghai, and was deeply venerated as a miracle-working
                          icon by Metropolitan Philaret, St. John of Shanghai and the entire Church
                          Abroad.



                          With love in Christ,

                          Prot. Alexander Lebedeff


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                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Michael Nikitin
                          This just goes to show how much influence the Latins had on the Russian Church. Michael N. From: for4z@aol.com Reply-To: orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com To:
                          Message 12 of 25 , Mar 7, 2003
                            This just goes to show how much influence the Latins had on the Russian
                            Church.


                            Michael N.

                            From: for4z@...
                            Reply-To: orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com
                            To: orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [orthodox-synod] Re: Iconography, was: a variety of other
                            things
                            Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 06:52:27 EST

                            In a message dated 3/5/2003 2:34:03 PM Pacific Standard Time,
                            jbaglien@... writes:
                            >
                            > --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, Michael Nikitin wrote:
                            > > Wasn't it the Sto Glaviy Sobor in the Russian Church which
                            > explicitly forbids depiction of icons of God the Father?
                            > ......
                            > I suspect that someone wanting a contemporary composition of God the
                            > Father as
                            > an old man in their church might have some difficultly finding a
                            > willing iconographer and/or an episcopal blessing, both because of
                            > the theological issues implicit in the prototype, and the potential
                            > for stumbling sensitive parishioners.
                            >



                            Russia's main cathedral, the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow, has
                            an enormous icon of the Lord God Sabaoth in the main dome, over 100 feet
                            wide, where God the Father is portrayed as an old man. Metropolitan St.
                            Philaret of Moscow played an integral part in helping to plan the Cathedral,
                            working closely with the architect Konstantine Ton, influencing such design
                            decisions as the octagonal chapel-like iconastasis and choosing the subjects
                            of the sculpture frieze on the cathedral's exterior. Furthermore, this
                            cathedral was built during the "Russian Renassiance," when Russian church
                            architecture, iconography, music, and ecclesiastical art were at their
                            height. Thus, if at one point depictions of God the Father as an old man
                            were outlawed in Russia, this later changed.

                            -Nick Zaharov
                            PS..In the 16th Century the Russian Church also banned and halted the
                            construction of "tent-style" churches, such as St. Basil's (Protection) on
                            Red Square. Despite this, our Church Abroad has a few examples of such
                            church types: Jordanville Cathedral and Transfiguration Cathedral in Los
                            Angeles, the construction of the latter still being unfinished........



                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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                          • Fr. Alexander Lebedeff
                            ... Kirill should know that I was the person honored to give the keynote speech at the 700th Anniversary of the Kursk-Root Icon in 1995--titled The Historical
                            Message 13 of 25 , Mar 7, 2003
                              Kirill Bart wrote:

                              >Fr. Alexander, you should know that icon of Theotokos of Kursk-Korenaya is
                              >only a small icon in a middle of an icon with blue cover that we all know.
                              >So, borders had been added in a later times and image of God the Father
                              >are of a relatively new origin.
                              >Subdeacon Kirill


                              Kirill should know that I was the person honored to give the keynote speech
                              at the 700th Anniversary of the Kursk-Root Icon in 1995--titled "The
                              Historical and Religious Significance of the Kursk-Root Icon of the Mother
                              of God for the Russian Diaspora."

                              This was published as a brochure and published also in "Orthodox Tradition."

                              So, I believe I am as familiar as anyone with the history of the Kursk-Root
                              icon.

                              This icon was brought to Moscow at the direction of Tsar Feodor Ivanovich
                              in 1597, who commanded that the additions to the Icon--namely the Image of
                              the Lord Sabaoth and the Prophets holding scrolls be made. His Tsaritza,
                              Irina Feodorovna adorned the Icon with a precious riza.

                              This was three hundred years after the appearance of the Icon in 1295.

                              Since the addition, more than four hundred years have passed.

                              Therefore, calling the image of God the Father "of a relatively new origin"
                              is unsubstantiated.


                              With love in Christ,

                              Prot. Alexander Lebedeff
                            • boulia_1
                              Well, the readers of this list should be used to low ranking clergy and non clergy members thinking they know better than long-standing high-ranking clergy! I
                              Message 14 of 25 , Mar 7, 2003
                                Well, the readers of this list should be used to low ranking clergy
                                and non clergy members thinking they know better than long-standing
                                high-ranking clergy!

                                I remember your address, Fr. Alexander. It was quite a
                                wonderful, beautiful event, the 700th anniversary of our Hodigitria's
                                miraculous icon... joyous, uplifting, despite a frigid early winter
                                blast, and memorable.

                                In Christ's love,
                                Elizabeth

                                --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, "Fr. Alexander Lebedeff"
                                <lebedeff@w...> wrote:
                                > Kirill Bart wrote:
                                >
                                > >Fr. Alexander, you should know that icon of Theotokos of
                                Kursk-Korenaya is
                                > >only a small icon in a middle of an icon with blue cover that we
                                all know.
                                > >So, borders had been added in a later times and image of God the
                                Father
                                > >are of a relatively new origin.
                                > >Subdeacon Kirill
                                >
                                >
                                > Kirill should know that I was the person honored to give the keynote
                                speech
                                > at the 700th Anniversary of the Kursk-Root Icon in 1995--titled "The
                                > Historical and Religious Significance of the Kursk-Root Icon of the
                                Mother
                                > of God for the Russian Diaspora."
                                >
                                > This was published as a brochure and published also in "Orthodox
                                Tradition."
                                >
                                > So, I believe I am as familiar as anyone with the history of the
                                Kursk-Root
                                > icon.
                                >
                                > This icon was brought to Moscow at the direction of Tsar Feodor
                                Ivanovich
                                > in 1597, who commanded that the additions to the Icon--namely the
                                Image of
                                > the Lord Sabaoth and the Prophets holding scrolls be made. His
                                Tsaritza,
                                > Irina Feodorovna adorned the Icon with a precious riza.
                                >
                                > This was three hundred years after the appearance of the Icon in
                                1295.
                                >
                                > Since the addition, more than four hundred years have passed.
                                >
                                > Therefore, calling the image of God the Father "of a relatively new
                                origin"
                                > is unsubstantiated.
                                >
                                >
                                > With love in Christ,
                                >
                                > Prot. Alexander Lebedeff
                              • for4z@aol.com
                                In a message dated 3/7/2003 2:23:28 PM Pacific Standard Time, ... Well, sadly, or perhaps refreshingly, age and rank does not necesarily dictate or ascribe
                                Message 15 of 25 , Mar 8, 2003
                                  In a message dated 3/7/2003 2:23:28 PM Pacific Standard Time,
                                  eledkovsky@... writes:


                                  > Well, the readers of this list should be used to low ranking clergy
                                  > and non clergy members thinking they know better than long-standing
                                  > high-ranking clergy!
                                  >

                                  Well, sadly, or perhaps refreshingly, age and rank does not necesarily
                                  dictate or ascribe knowledge in a particular discipline or field. Our church
                                  is not a cult; we do not have infallible cult figures. This list is not
                                  about who knows more on a certain topic or who can "outdo" someone else with
                                  a more clever, witty, catchy, or even more arrogant response or explanation.
                                  I think it is beneficial and crucial to promote discussion, to question, to
                                  be answered, and to provide answers ourselves. All of these exercises help
                                  us grow in our common understanding of current issues and in evaluating
                                  history and the teachings of our fathers. This is the approach of education;
                                  the approach of sharing information; the approach of brotherly love. This
                                  list is meant to allow all of us "low ranking clergy and non clergy members"
                                  to express our thoughts, our concerns, and our heartaches. Not all of us are
                                  professors, not all of us are saints. Contributors to this list should not
                                  be put down or discourgaged from doing so....

                                  -Nick Zaharov


                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • boulia_1
                                  ... necesarily ... EAL replies: Dear Nick, you are right, but knowledge is not *precluded* by age, rank and experience, either! What I meant to point out is
                                  Message 16 of 25 , Mar 9, 2003
                                    Nick Zaharov wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Well, sadly, or perhaps refreshingly, age and rank does not
                                    necesarily
                                    > dictate or ascribe knowledge in a particular discipline or field.


                                    EAL replies: Dear Nick, you are right, but knowledge is not
                                    *precluded* by age, rank and experience, either! What I meant to
                                    point out is that, all too often on this list, someone
                                    (sometimes signing off as "subdeacon" or "reader") posts some
                                    know-it-all comment directed at one of our Archpriests in a haughty
                                    manner that implies an opinion that he is opening a revelation to that
                                    Archpriest. Sometimes this disresepectful attitude may not be
                                    intentional, but, often, it seems to be.

                                    As an aside, until I started reading this list, I never heard of
                                    subdeacons and readers going around referring to themselves that way.
                                    No one I know in the Synod HQ, for example, goes around calling George
                                    Schatiloff (the senior subdeacon there, subdeacon to Metr. Philaret,
                                    so, wearing the orar for at least 25 years) "Subdeacon George" (in
                                    English or Russian) nor can I imagine him EVER signing his name that
                                    way. The way I always understood it, these ranks were only formally
                                    used in ecclesiastical documents (ukaze, gramata, that sort of
                                    thing). Only upper clergy (Deacons or higher) were addressed in a
                                    manner that acknowledged their position. So, it seems odd to me, this
                                    fashion -- somewhat in line with some of the cross-cultural etiquette
                                    that Mr. Kozyreff wrote about quite intelligently a few posts earlier.

                                    NZ wrote further:
                                    > Our church
                                    > is not a cult; we do not have infallible cult figures.

                                    EAL responds: Who said anything about infallability or assigned 'cult'
                                    status to anyone?

                                    NZ continued:
                                    >This list is
                                    not
                                    > about who knows more on a certain topic or who can "outdo" someone
                                    >else with
                                    > a more clever, witty, catchy, or even more arrogant response or
                                    >explanation.
                                    > I think it is beneficial and crucial to promote discussion, to
                                    question, to
                                    > be answered, and to provide answers ourselves. All of these
                                    exercises help
                                    > us grow in our common understanding of current issues and in
                                    evaluating
                                    > history and the teachings of our fathers. This is the approach of
                                    education;
                                    > the approach of sharing information; the approach of brotherly love.

                                    EAL agrees wholeheartedly. For better (but often for worse), this
                                    medium is a communication tool. But it is one which is easily abused,
                                    allowing for carelessness that few would dare allow in face-to-face
                                    discussions. I object to displays of disrespect. And I especially
                                    object to displays of disrespect toward clergy. Agree or disagree with
                                    the person, but one must always show love and regard for their "san"
                                    (sorry I don't know the best translation for this word)! We do not
                                    assign cult status to ranks, but we do respect ranks in Orthodoxy.

                                    Hence, I find it embarassing when it seems not to matter to some
                                    people that thet addressing a senior clergy member rudely. How can
                                    it not matter that these are men who not only gave many years of their
                                    lives over to study of the Scriptures, holy Fathers, church Tradition
                                    (I speak now of those clergy members who attended seminary), but also
                                    have spent years tending their flocks, caring for people? How many of
                                    us 'lower' and 'non-clergy' people have made that kind of
                                    whole life commitment to God, people and the Church?

                                    Thinking specifically of some of this lists more frequent posting
                                    Archpriests, Frs. John (whom I have never met), Alexander (whom I have
                                    met but do not know well) and Stefan (whom I am lucky to know and
                                    whom I love dearly), together they very nearly have a century of
                                    experience, education and WISDOM. How many hundreds of people have
                                    they baptized, married, buried? How many THOUSANDS of times have they
                                    presided over Divine Liturgy and the holiest of mysteries -- and to
                                    how many thousands (tens of thousands, probably) of people have they
                                    administered Holy Communion? And we, who have not given up a comfy
                                    secular life ("I think I'll sleep late just this one Sunday..."), dare
                                    to address such people with sarcasm or ill will?!

                                    That is not to say that Priests (these or any) and Bishops can't be
                                    wrong, and they can't be questioned. NOT at all. They are MEN and
                                    they make mistakes. But question them with respect, please, and with
                                    "brotherly love"!

                                    I did not mean to discourage anyone's expression of concerns or
                                    heartaches. But I do believe such expressions should be made in a
                                    manner decorous and becoming to an Orthodox Christian, without virtual
                                    sneers.

                                    With that thought, it being Forgiveness Sunday, I ask the forgiveness
                                    of all and do sincerely wish each person an edifying Great Lent.

                                    In Christ's love,
                                    Elizabeth
                                  • Michael Nikitin
                                    Thinking specifically of some of this lists more frequent posting Archpriests, Frs. John (whom I have never met), Alexander (whom I have met but do not know
                                    Message 17 of 25 , Mar 9, 2003
                                      "Thinking specifically of some of this lists more frequent posting
                                      Archpriests, Frs. John (whom I have never met), Alexander (whom I have
                                      met but do not know well) and Stefan (whom I am lucky to know and
                                      whom I love dearly), together they very nearly have a century of
                                      experience, education and WISDOM. How many hundreds of people have
                                      they baptized, married, buried? How many THOUSANDS of times have they
                                      presided over Divine Liturgy and the holiest of mysteries -- and to
                                      how many thousands (tens of thousands, probably) of people have they
                                      administered Holy Communion? And we, who have not given up a comfy
                                      secular life ("I think I'll sleep late just this one Sunday..."), dare
                                      to address such people with sarcasm or ill will?!"

                                      Clergy with large parishes get paid well. On top of that some receive
                                      bording for free. They also get paid for Baptisms, marriages and burials.
                                      And their lifes are as comfy if not more comfortable than some of ours.

                                      There are clergy with small parishes that cannot sustain them. These clergy
                                      have to work,serve,do baptisms,marriages and burials and not get paid. Their
                                      lifes are not so comfortable, especially if they have children.
                                      These clergy don't post on the lists. They are too busy helping their
                                      parishioners spiritually.

                                      Just as laypeople, clergy should also not address laypeople with sarcasm or
                                      ill will.

                                      I ask forgiveness and wish everyone a spiritually growing lent.

                                      Michael N.

                                      From: "boulia_1" <eledkovsky@...>
                                      Reply-To: orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com
                                      To: orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: [orthodox-synod] Re: Iconography, was: a variety of other things
                                      Date: Sun, 09 Mar 2003 17:36:37 -0000



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                                    • sergerust2002
                                      S PRAZDNIKOM, DEAR LIST ! TO THE FOLLOWING QUESTION: Who is Vethiy Den mi that we sing on the holiday of Meeting of our Lord I believe? Isn t it our Savior?
                                      Message 18 of 25 , Jun 5, 2003
                                        S PRAZDNIKOM, DEAR LIST !

                                        TO THE FOLLOWING QUESTION:

                                        Who is "Vethiy Den'mi" that we sing on the holiday of
                                        Meeting of our Lord" I believe? Isn't it our Savior?
                                        (Michael Nikitine, post 7990, Mar 4, 2003)


                                        WE GOT 3 CONCORDING ANSWERS:

                                        He who is pictured is Christ, the "Ancient of Days",
                                        not God the Father.
                                        (Staphanos, post 7985, Mar 3, 2003)

                                        Our east wall includes, at its apex, Christ the Ancient of Days ...
                                        (fr James Baglien, post 7999, Mar 5, 2003)

                                        Of course the "Ancient of Days" refers to Our Savior--the
                                        stikhiras of the Feast say "Today the Elder Symeon takes
                                        in his hands the Ancient of Days..."
                                        (fr Alexander Lebedeff, post 8006, Mar 6, 2003)


                                        HERE IS A 4-TH ANSWER, OPPOSING THE PREVIOUS 3:

                                        « Now `tis time that our Discourse should celebrate God (Whose
                                        Names are many) as "Omnipotent" and "Ancient of Days." The former
                                        title is given Him because ... [about omnipotence] ... And "Ancient
                                        of Days" is a title given to God because He is the Eternity of all
                                        things and their Time and is anterior to Days and anterior to
                                        Eternity and Time. And the titles "Time", "Day", "Season",
                                        and "Eternity" must be applied to Him in a divine sense, to mean One
                                        Who is utterly incapable of all change and movement and, in His
                                        eternal motion, remains at rest ; and Who is the Cause whence
                                        Eternity, Time, and Days are derived. Wherefore in the Sacred
                                        Theophanies revealed in mystic Visions He is described as Ancient and
                                        yet as Young : the former title signifying that He is the Primal
                                        Being, existent from the Beginning through the entire process of the
                                        world onto the End. Or, as the divine Initiator [presumably
                                        Hierotheus] tells us, either term implies the Primal Being of God :
                                        the term "Ancient" signifying that He is First in point of Time, and
                                        the term "Young" that he possesses the Primacy in point of Number,
                                        since Unity and the properties of Unity have a primacy over the more
                                        advanced numbers ... [about time and eternity] ... And God we must
                                        celebrate as both Eternity and Time, as the Cause of all Time and
                                        Eternity and as the Ancient of Days ; as before Time and above Time
                                        and producing all the variety of times and seasons ; and again, as
                                        existing before Eternal Ages, in that He is before Eternity and above
                                        Eternity and His Kingdom is the Kingdom of all the Eternal Ages.
                                        Amen.» (St Dyonisius the Areopagite, The Divine Names, chapter 10)


                                        ANY HINT?

                                        SERGE RUST
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