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Re: Mixed Marriages

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  • Fr. John R. Shaw
    ... JRS: In the years that I have been a ROCOR priest (i.e. since 1976), I have officiated at more weddings that I can count. Recently, many or most of them
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 2, 2003
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      Kirill Bart wrote:

      > Mixed marriages are allowed as an exeption by
      > economia, not as a normal practice.
      > Subdeacon Kirill

      JRS: In the years that I have been a ROCOR priest (i.e. since 1976), I
      have officiated at more weddings that I can count.

      Recently, many or most of them have been between newcomers from Russia.
      These weddings are usually not "mixed", but both partners are Russians,
      and of the Orthodox faith.

      But that is only over the last 12 years.

      Before that, virtually *all* the weddings were "mixed". The children
      and grandchildren of Russian emigres *almost always* married non-
      Russians and non-Orthodox.

      There were only a few exceptions: I believe I can even recall most of
      them.

      Out of 100 or more weddings at the cathedral in Chicago, there was one
      (1) in which the son of one family from the parish married the daughter
      of another family. There was one case where a young lady who had
      already converted to Orthodoxy, married another convert who was a
      parishioner, and whom she met after joining the Church. There was one
      case in which a young man who married a girl from the parish became
      interested in Orthodoxy and converted out of his own conviction before
      the wedding; there was another case in which a bride converted. There
      was a case of a girl from the parish marrying a Greek-American, and
      another in which a young lady from the Old Rite parish in Erie, where
      they did not yet have an ordained priest, came to Chicago to marry a
      young man of Albanian Orthodox background.

      All the other weddings were "mixed".

      Archbishop Seraphim, of blessed memory, never said anything against
      these "mixed marriages": they had been an accepted fact of life in pre-
      revolutionary Russia.

      He also sent me to Minneapolis in 1978 to officiate at a wedding in St.
      Panteleimon's church there, and that was a "mixed marriage".

      In Christ
      Fr. John R. Shaw

      In Christ
      Fr. John R. Shaw
    • Fr. John R. Shaw <vrevjrs@execpc.com>
      ... of ... JRS: Well, I was wrong! After posting the above, I remembered quite a number of others [non- mixed marriages, that is]! So -- my apologies to any
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 2, 2003
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        --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, "Fr. John R. Shaw"
        <vrevjrs@e...> wrote:

        > Before that, virtually *all* the weddings were "mixed". ...
        > There were only a few exceptions: I believe I can even recall most
        of
        > them.

        JRS: Well, I was wrong!

        After posting the above, I remembered quite a number of others [non-
        mixed marriages, that is]!

        So -- my apologies to any who may realize they were *omitted* above...

        In Christ
        Fr. John R. Shaw
      • Hristofor
        ... Not only that, we don t live in an /Orthodox/ society, where there is a large selection of eligible spouses. Small ROCA parishes located far from
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 3, 2003
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          Fr. John R. Shaw wrote:

          >We do not live in a society where parents choose the marriage partners...
          >
          Not only that, we don't live in an /Orthodox/ society, where there is a
          large selection of eligible spouses. Small ROCA parishes located far
          from population centres are even worse off. I have heard many complaints
          from Americans in theire 20's and 30's complain about how hard it is to
          find a spouse and religion isn't even an issue with them.

          >One of the greatest problems our Church faces today is that so many of
          >the people know next to nothing about their religion -- and they may
          >teach their own children precisely nothing.
          >
          This is definitely true and unfortunately, was the case with at least
          one set of grandparents, who came to the US before 1917 from Western
          Russia and Ukraine.

          I have mentioned in previous postings the large number of second
          generation Orthodox folk that I know who have drifted/fallen away. Well,
          we now seem to have come full circle. The grandaughter of Ukrainian
          Orthodox immigrants, brought up and married RC (to someone from Ireland,
          no less), just had a baby girl and she and her husband have decided to
          baptise the girl /Orthodox!/ Talk about knowing next to nothing about
          the Orthodox Faith! I am on the one hand, thrilled that they decided to
          baptise her Orthodox, on the otherhand, the parents' knowledge of the
          Chruch is limited to 12 lenten dishes for Christmas Eve and bringing the
          basket to church on Holy Saturday to be blessed...

          Hristofor


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • stefanvpavlenko <StefanVPavlenko@netscap
          More people than you can imagine have their only grip on Orthodoxy by the handle on an Easter Basket. But is it not our duty then, to start from that basket
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 3, 2003
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            More people than you can imagine have their only grip on Orthodoxy by
            the handle on an Easter Basket. But is it not our duty then, to start
            from that basket and preach Christ and his Church to them, not
            allowing sectarian interlopers to make those people lose their grip on
            our Holy Faith?



            --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, Hristofor <hristofor@m...> wrote:
            > Fr. John R. Shaw wrote:
            >
            > >We do not live in a society where parents choose the marriage
            partners...
            > >
            > Not only that, we don't live in an /Orthodox/ society, where there
            is a
            > large selection of eligible spouses. Small ROCA parishes located far
            > from population centres are even worse off. I have heard many
            complaints
            > from Americans in theire 20's and 30's complain about how hard it is to
            > find a spouse and religion isn't even an issue with them.
            >
            > >One of the greatest problems our Church faces today is that so many of
            > >the people know next to nothing about their religion -- and they may
            > >teach their own children precisely nothing.
            > >
            > This is definitely true and unfortunately, was the case with at least
            > one set of grandparents, who came to the US before 1917 from Western
            > Russia and Ukraine.
            >
            > I have mentioned in previous postings the large number of second
            > generation Orthodox folk that I know who have drifted/fallen away.
            Well,
            > we now seem to have come full circle. The grandaughter of Ukrainian
            > Orthodox immigrants, brought up and married RC (to someone from
            Ireland,
            > no less), just had a baby girl and she and her husband have decided to
            > baptise the girl /Orthodox!/ Talk about knowing next to nothing about
            > the Orthodox Faith! I am on the one hand, thrilled that they decided to
            > baptise her Orthodox, on the otherhand, the parents' knowledge of the
            > Chruch is limited to 12 lenten dishes for Christmas Eve and bringing
            the
            > basket to church on Holy Saturday to be blessed...
            >
            > Hristofor
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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