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Re: The Heap

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  • Fr. John R. Shaw
    ... (Luke ... For the sake of those who, like myself, are interested in such things, I also discovered that the Slavonic/Russian word KUPA is the cognate of
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 29 2:45 PM
      Fr. John R. Shaw had written:

      > I was interested enough in this to turn to Diachenko's Slavonic
      > dictionary, where, on p. 275, there is the following entry:
      >
      > KUPA: (= Greek "soros"), a heap (Cf. II Chronicles 31:6); a group
      (Luke
      > 9:14).

      For the sake of those who, like myself, are interested in such things,
      I also discovered that the Slavonic/Russian word KUPA is the cognate of
      our English word "heap".

      Thus for example if you have Eric Partridge's book, "ORIGINS: A short
      Etymological Dictionary of Modern English", on p. 282 near the top of
      the right-hand column, you can read:

      "HEAP, noun, comes via Middle English "heep, heap" from Old
      English "heapan", which is akin to Old Frisian "haap", Old
      Saxon "hoop", Old High German "hufo, houf", German "Haufen",
      Dutch "hoop", also to Old Slavonic "kupu" (Church Slavonic "kup,
      kupa"), and Sanskrit "kaofa", ('a great heap').

      Of course, "vkupe" is derived from "kup" or "kupa", but the meaning is
      not the same if the word is separated into its components (cf.
      English "he is ahead" vs. "he is a head [i.e. drug user]" -- or such
      forms as "I have gotten tickets" vs. "I have got ten tickets"). Spaces
      do make a difference...

      If all of this seems silly to you -- remember that, from such word
      exercises, one can often improve one's vocabulary in two languages at
      the same time...

      In Christ
      Fr. John R. Shaw
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