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RE: ROCA demographics

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  • Reader Michael Malloy
    I too would be interested in an accurate census of serious members of ROCA. Speaking as one of many converts to the Orthodox Church, I can only say that I felt
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 9, 2002
      I too would be interested in an accurate census of serious members of ROCA.

      Speaking as one of many converts to the Orthodox Church, I can only say
      that I felt compelled to become Orthodox Christian much the same way the
      first Russians did. The beauty and truth of Orthodox worship is
      overwhelming to anyone who has not experienced it before.

      For the most part, my wife and I were repulsed from the lunacy of the
      hyper-revisionism ongoing in the Episcopal church. This is too bad,
      because at least twice in the past roughly 100 years, the Anglicans nearly
      became Orthodox. That opportunity is long lost due to the turns the
      Anglican church has taken in the past 30 years or so.

      This leaves us with the Orthodox. Personally, I adore the Russian
      approach. I like Russian people very much and I feel very much at home
      with them. You could say my heart and soul long to be Russian. But, I'm
      tagged with a Celtic surname - a culture alien to me since birth.

      I'm puzzled somewhat by the debate over language. Sure, I speak
      English. It's my mother tongue. But I understand what is being said in a
      great deal of the Liturgy in Church Slavonic and I see no reason to make
      everything Anglo. Those who have no interest in learning the language of
      the Russian Church are missing a great deal. I'm going to spend the rest
      of my natural life learning.

      --------- End of Message -------------

      Reader Michael Malloy
      Saint Nicholas the Wonderworker Orthodox Church
      Columbus Ohio
      (malloy.2@...)

      "A Psalm is the tranquility of souls, the arbitrator of peace, restraining
      the disorder and turbulence of thoughts, for it softens the passion of the
      soul and moderates its unruliness. A Psalm forms friendships, unites the
      divided, mediates between enemies. For who can still consider him an enemy
      with whom he has set forth one voice to God? So that the singing of Psalms
      brings love, the greatest of good things, contriving harmony like some bond
      of union and uniting the people in the symphony of a single choir."

      St. Basil the Great; in: Strunk, W. Oliver (William Oliver), 1901- comp.:
      Source readings in music history from classical antiquity through the
      romantic era. New York, Norton [1950]
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