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An MP Clergyman says: "By Their Fruits Shall Ye Know Them"

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  • intrprtr@prodigy.net
    BY THEIR FRUITS SHALL YE KNOW THEM (Matt. 7, 16) or HOW ARE WE TO LIVE HENCEFORTH? -- A Dolorous Pascha In the Cathedral Of Christ the Saviour (The Letter
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 30, 2001
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      "BY THEIR FRUITS SHALL YE KNOW THEM" (Matt. 7, 16)

      or

      "HOW ARE WE TO LIVE HENCEFORTH?"

      -- A Dolorous Pascha In the Cathedral Of Christ the Saviour

      (The Letter Of a Participant On the Internet-Forum, Deacon Andrey Kurayev)

      The Russian text is available at: http://www.listok.com/heresy13.htm

      ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

      Christ is Risen!

      It is a fact that I, -- and, probably, also many of those who attended the
      Paschal service this night in the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour, --
      experienced a dolorous Pascha. From the very start, I had not wanted to go
      there. I am a parishioner of the Sretenskii ["Meeting Of the Lord"]
      Monastery and was preparing to greet [the Feast of] Pascha there. I went
      to confession, received a blessing to take Communion, and read the rule; in
      general, by 20:00 hours [08:00 p.m.], I was already prepared to go, but a
      friend called and said that he had obtained invitations to the Patriarchal
      Service.

      Honestly, I really didn't want to go. I attempted to telephone my
      spiritual-father for advice, but the line was busy. And I needed to make
      an immediate decision; I very much loved the Patriarch; it was always a
      great joy for me to see him; and to be present, moreover, at a service
      [where he was officiating]. That factor outweighed everything else, in
      addition to which my friend said that he wanted to make me a present of
      this. So, all in all, then, I went.

      It was a strange service; there was not a single hierarch present, except
      for the Archbishop of Istrinsk. A VIP-zone was cordoned-off, in which were
      gathered: Zhirinovskii, Kobzon... I don't watch television and therefore
      don't know all the faces of today's Politburo, but by their sleek grooming
      it was possible to guess that these were not "ordinary mortals." All of
      this, of course, caused some tension; well, all right, let these people
      attend the Cathedral at least once in their lives, perhaps something will
      stir in their souls. This could not ruin the holiday; the Patriarch was
      serving; it was Pascha; and awaiting us was the Chalice that assuages all
      sorrows.

      But "simple mortals" were not accorded the Chalice that evening. The
      Patriarch came out, communed the Politburo and carried the Chalice back
      into the Altar. I was not alone in awaiting Communion. To my right and to
      my left, Orthodox folk were thronged, so shocked by what had transpired
      that no one knew what to do. They attempted to continue singing the
      Paschal stichiras, but quickly fell silent. I tried to cry out, in order
      to attract attention. The security police responded to my shouts. I was
      called-out of the crowd and politely requested to shut up. They informed
      me that everything would be over now, and then all the rest of the people
      would be communed. The Chalice would be brought out especially for
      us. Now, of course, I understand that this was absurd, but then the shock
      was so great that I would have believed any nonsense, whatsoever.

      After the conclusion of the service, we did not depart for a long time. No
      one could understand anything. Gradually, it became clear that the
      declaration that the Chalice would be brought out later was a tactical
      subterfuge on the part of the security police, in order to let off steam.

      Honestly speaking, I can't come back to my senses to this time. That, of
      course, is on account of our sins; but, nevertheless, my head simply can't
      contain it all. There were no technical reasons making Communion
      impossible that day. They simply DID NOT WANT to commune us.

      Now, I simply don't know how to pray for our Patriarch at every service; to
      ask the Lord to commemorate him, first of all. I do not want to learn to
      be two-faced. O ye Orthodox, tell me how to continue living with all
      this? I understand that this is an attempt by the Lord to knock some sense
      into our heads. But sense in regard to what? That our hierarchy has
      become rotten? And that we are to rely only upon the Lord now? O Lord,
      save me, for Thy venerable one hath grown weak? But we should be attending
      the Cathedral, for the Lord is there with His salvific Mysteries. And I
      will never doubt the verity of the Orthodox Church. What, then, is to be
      done? Should we close our eyes and again attempt to work out humility? Do
      we need such humility?

      A neighbor-lady in misfortune said: "It's obvious that this place is truly
      accursed." In a fit of irritation, I cast away the torn-up invitation,
      which I had been prepared to preserve as a keepsake, and spat at the steps
      of the cathedral. I don't know why, but I simply no longer want to write
      [that word] with a capital letter. And, for the time being, I'm not
      prepared to repent of this. Although, of course, that was not a nice
      action [on my part].

      But how are we to live henceforth?

      I ask the non-Orthodox not to concern themselves with this subject, as this
      is our internal affair.

      ========================================================================

      -- GeoS

      *******************************************************************************************************************
      Communing with great Russian literature (and culture in general), with its
      eternal humaneness and principled values, can be but beneficial for each
      person in expanding his horizons; and in those people who are capable of
      thought, it will even tend, in the final analysis, to stimulate them toward
      justice and liberty. -- Vladimir Rudinskii

      *******************************************************************************************************************

      http://www.geocities.com/kitezhgrad/index.html

      ----------


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    • intrprtr@prodigy.net
      I potentially stand corrected. It was the ambiguity of the Russian statement: pismo uchastnika internet-foruma diakona Andreya Kurayeva that threw me. I
      Message 2 of 3 , May 1, 2001
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        I potentially stand corrected. It was the ambiguity of the Russian
        statement: "pismo uchastnika
        internet-foruma diakona Andreya Kurayeva" that threw me. I read it to mean
        that Deacon Andrey Kurayev was a participant in a specific Internet-Forum
        and wrote the letter in question, since that seemed to be the most logical
        interpretation thereof -- especially in view of the fact that the writer
        states: "Now, I simply don't know how to pray for our Patriarch at every
        service; to ask the Lord to commemorate him, first of all." ("Ya nye znayu,
        kak teper' na kazhdoi sluzhbe molitsya za nashego Patriarkha, prosit'
        Gospoda pervym pomyanut' yego.") This seems to imply that the writer is a
        member of the clergy -- at least, a deacon -- for no lay-person, to the
        best of my knowledge, exclaims the petitions of an ektenya! The laity
        merely utter the refrain. Hence, my Subject title.

        Since then, however, I have received innumerable "loving admonitions" (for
        want of a better term!!) which claim that Deacon Andrey Kurayev is actually
        the owner of said Internet-Forum, and that the letter in question was
        written by an "anonymous" lay-participant thereon.

        If this is true, and if I have misled anyone through my translation, I
        humbly apologize for any potential -- but, unintentional --
        "misrepresentation" of the situation on my part. However, even if the
        writer was not Deacon Andrey Kurayev, I still believe that it would have
        had to have been a member of the clergy -- otherwise, I would appreciate
        someone explaining how it is that a lay-person would be exclaiming the
        petitions of an ektenya??

        >"BY THEIR FRUITS SHALL YE KNOW THEM" (Matt. 7, 16)
        >
        >or
        >
        >"HOW ARE WE TO LIVE HENCEFORTH?"
        >
        >-- A Dolorous Pascha In the Cathedral Of Christ the Saviour
        >
        >(The Letter Of a Participant On the Internet-Forum, Deacon Andrey Kurayev)
        >
        >The Russian text is available at: http://www.listok.com/heresy13.htm


        ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

        {SNIP}

        ========================================================================

        -- GeoS

        *******************************************************************************************************************
        Communing with great Russian literature (and culture in general), with its
        eternal humaneness and principled values, can be but beneficial for each
        person in expanding his horizons; and in those people who are capable of
        thought, it will even tend, in the final analysis, to stimulate them toward
        justice and liberty. -- Vladimir Rudinskii

        *******************************************************************************************************************

        http://www.geocities.com/kitezhgrad/index.html

        ----------


        ---
        Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
        Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
        Version: 6.0.250 / Virus Database: 123 - Release Date: 18-Apr-01


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • V. J. Boitchenko
        I think it just says to pray for our Patriarch i.e. Lord have mercy if I understand it correctly. v states: Now, I simply don t know how to pray for our
        Message 3 of 3 , May 2, 2001
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          I think it just says "to pray for our Patriarch" i.e. "Lord have mercy" if I understand it correctly.

          v
          states: "Now, I simply don't know how to pray for our Patriarch at every
          service; to ask the Lord to commemorate him, first of all." ("Ya nye znayu,
          kak teper' na kazhdoi sluzhbe molitsya za nashego Patriarkha, prosit'
          Gospoda pervym pomyanut' yego.") This seems to imply that the writer is a
          member of the clergy -- at least, a deacon -- for no lay-person, to the
          best of my knowledge, exclaims the petitions of an ektenya! The laity
          merely utter the refrain. Hence, my Subject title.




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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