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[sn-vesti 1593] My letter published in The Washington Times - 28 Feb.

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  • intrprtr@prodigy.net
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR February 28, 2001/pg A18 Genocide is poor justification for bombing Serbs Georgie Anne Geyer apparently opened a
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 28, 2001
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      THE WASHINGTON TIMES

      LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
      February 28, 2001/pg A18


      'Genocide' is poor justification for bombing Serbs

      Georgie Anne Geyer apparently opened a hornet's nest with her Feb. 19
      Commentary
      column, "Defining the U.N. mission in Kosovo." Letters from Daniel McAdams
      of the
      British Helsinki Human Rights Group in Washington ("Questionable 'morality'
      in Kosovo intervention," Feb. 21) and Carolyn Rahal ("U.N. official and his
      unusual
      'Christian values' about Kosovo mission," Feb. 22) both took exception to
      Miss Geyer's
      views. Her Feb. 21 Commentary column, "Situation worsens in beleaguered
      Kosovo,"
      continues her pattern of painting the ethnic Albanians as victims, even
      blaming the
      Serbs for the latest round of atrocities committed against the Serbian and
      non-Albanian population. Underlying it all is the attitude that the Serbs are
      only getting what they deserve.

      But consider this: Thus far, there is no evidence that 100,000 ethnic
      Albanians were
      killed, as former Secretary of Defense William Cohen claimed. Nor has the
      body count
      come close to substantiating that implied by former President Clinton in
      his comment
      that 600,000 ethnic Albanians were "lacking shelter, short of food, afraid
      to go home
      or buried in mass graves dug by their executioners." The number of
      civilians killed
      during the war in Kosovo may be no more than 2,500 on both sides, according
      to Emilio
      Perez Pujol, a pathologist who led the Spanish body-searching
      team. Likewise, reports
      that 700 murdered Albanians were dumped in the Trepca mine shaft have yet to be
      substantiated. Yet, as recently as this month, National Public Radio
      reported that
      1,500 bodies were in the mine and went on to claim that Serbs had chopped
      up the
      bodies in a grinder used to process ore and then fed the remains to the
      furnace.
      This story has the same merit as the report of Serbs being accused of
      cannibalism in
      Bosnia.

      The title of a Dec. 31, 1999, Wall Street Journal article says it all: "War
      in Kosovo
      Was Cruel, Bitter, Savage; Genocide It Wasn't — Tales of Mass Atrocity
      Arose and
      Were Passed Along, Often With Little Proof — No Corpses in the Mine Shaft"
      The Journal
      reported, "By late summer, stories about a Nazi-like body-disposal facility
      were so
      widespread that investigators sent a three-man French gendarmerie team
      spelunking half
      a mile down to the mine to search for bodies. They found none. Another team
      analyzed
      ashes in the furnace. They found no teeth or other signs of burnt bodies."

      The article further states, " . . . other allegations — indiscriminate mass
      murder,
      rape camps, crematoriums, mutilation of the dead — haven't been borne out
      in the six
      months since NATO troops entered Kosovo." Why, then, does the report of a
      Serbian
      massacre continue to have legs, demonizing one ethnic group in a bloody
      civil war?

      On Jan. 17, Deutsche Presse-Agentur reported: "Finnish forensic experts in
      a final
      report on the circumstances of deaths two years ago of some 40 people in
      the village
      of Racak in Kosovo found no evidence of a massacre by Serb security
      forces." Wasn't
      that the massacre that was used to justify the 78-day bombing of the Serbian
      population?

      While alleged atrocities are overplayed, real ones receive little or no
      coverage in
      the U.S. news media. Had the recent attack on a Serb bus, which killed at
      least 10
      Serbs under the noses of NATO's Kosovo implementation force troops, been an
      attack on
      Albanians, you would have seen the entire gory scene on CNN every hour. Not
      so for
      atrocities against the Serbian population.

      John Ranz, chairman of Survivors of Buchenwald Concentration Camp, said,
      "[T]his
      gigantic campaign to brainwash America by our media against the Serbian people
      is just incredible, with its daily dose of one-sided information and
      outright lies".
      I share this sentiment.

      STELLA L. JATRAS
      Sterling, Va.

      ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

      -- GeoS

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