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Re: [orthodox-synod] Something to look into

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  • Theodora
    snip In this article in mentions how the French have been adding (among other things) dried bulls blood into there wines as a clarifying agent. Is there
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 1, 2001
      snip
      In this article in mentions how the French have been adding (among other
      things) dried bulls blood into there wines "as a clarifying agent." Is
      there anyone here who
      > understands the process of producing Port wines (which are blended) or the
      other red wines we commonly use for the Altar?

      snip

      Bless Father. If you get any response on this could you please post. I was
      watching a program on Mad Cow disease the other night and this was mentioned
      when discussing the ban on any cattle products ...as this disease has spread
      so rapidily through Europe and South America and with the accidents occuring
      here in this country we should know of these things. There is not test for
      this disease and it's method of transfernace is not known yet. I was under
      the understanding that in this country the production of Port (Fairbanks)
      was not made this way. Anyone in Calf. know for sure???

      May God bless and keep you
      Theodora in the mountains
    • seraphim shinn
      ... http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/uk/newsid_1083000/1083007.stm ... Father Bless! Clarifying agents are used in most wines. They act as a filter to remove
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 1, 2001
        --- frandrew@... wrote:
        >
        http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/uk/newsid_1083000/1083007.stm
        >
        > In this article in mentions how the French have been
        > adding (among other things) dried bulls blood into
        > there wines "as a clarifying agent."

        Father Bless!

        Clarifying agents are used in most wines.
        They act as a filter to remove any impurities from the
        end product.
        Added to the top of the cask, they are allowed to
        settle to the bottom, carrying impurities with them.
        Then the clarifying agent, along with the impurities,
        is removed before bottling.
        There are altar wines made for Orthodox use, you might
        seek them out.
        There is also a sweet red wine from Greece you might
        try out, it is Mavrodaphne of Patris, I doubt it has
        any suspect ingredients.
        Clarifying is done in large, high-tech wineries.
        Also I have noticed that when I finish a bottle of
        Mavrodaphne, there is always a residue in the bottom,
        which would have been removed by the clarification
        process.
        Real Port, from Portugal is also unfiltered, but
        pricy.



        Is there
        > anyone here who
        > understands the process of producing Port wines
        > (which are blended) or the other red wines we
        > commonly use for the Altar?
        >
        > We have been fortunate enough to have a wine maker
        > in our parish who supplies us or we have used
        > "kosher" in between vintages. But this "practice" of
        > the French
        > certainly needs to be looked into a bit, to see how
        > widespread it is, as it raises some concerns. Is it
        > just a local french practise or a common one in the
        > industry?
        >
        > It would be very helpful if anyone could shed a
        > little light on this subject.
        >
        > Fr. Andrew
        >
        >
        >


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      • orthodixie@aol.com
        Here s an article on the use of clarifying agents (such as bull s blood) in wine.
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 2, 2001
          Here's an article on the use of clarifying agents (such as bull's blood) in
          wine.

          <A
          HREF="http://wine.about.com/library/weekly/aa101299.htm?terms=wine+clarifying+

          agent">Blood in Troubled Wines</A>

          http://wine.about.com/library/weekly/aa101299.htm?terms=wine+clarifying+agent

          Apparently, unless you buy Hungarian wine, yours is bull's blood free.



          Fr Joseph Huneycutt
          St Nicholas Church (ROCOR)
          Fletcher, NC
          www.stnicholasparish.org
        • moserd@micron.net
          ... other ... agent. Is ... blended) or the ... Port wine, or as it is more properly known, Oporto, is originally a product of Portugal - not France. Oporto
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 2, 2001
            --- In orthodox-synod@y..., "Theodora" <theomtn@a...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > snip
            > In this article in mentions how the French have been adding (among
            other
            > things) dried bulls blood into there wines "as a clarifying
            agent." Is
            > there anyone here who
            > > understands the process of producing Port wines (which are
            blended) or the
            > other red wines we commonly use for the Altar?

            Port wine, or as it is more properly known, Oporto, is originally a
            product of Portugal - not France. Oporto gets its name from the main
            city of the region where this wine is produced. It is a wine that is
            blended with Brandy as a stabalizing agent in order for it to
            withstand shipping more easily. It became popular in England during
            the various Franco-British wars when French wine was unobtainable in
            Gr. Britain. Only Port wine produced in Portugal can be labeled by
            the proper name "Oporto". Other imitations produced in North America
            and other places not in Portugal usually carry the
            appelation "Port". One of the things to consider in purchasing Port
            wine for the altar over other wines is that although true Oporto is
            pure grape wine (Brandy being nothing more than distilled wine) other
            imitations are often sweetened to appease the Western palate. Port
            is also a "fortified" wine which is therefore higher in alcohol. The
            use of other less alcohol intensive sweet/dessert wines may be
            desireable.

            As to the use of "bull's blood" in French wine - I have no real
            knowledge - but if you are buying port, be certain that no French
            vineyard would dream of producing such a wine - it is just not good
            tradition and would be considered completely out of the question for
            a French vineyard to produce port - just as it would be out of the
            question for a Portuguese vineyard to produce a Burgundy or Bordeaux.

            For those who want a simple discussion of how various wines are made,
            drunk and their distinctive characteristics, I recommend the
            book, "Wine for Dummies". Its clear, easy to read and quite full of
            factual information (and the source of much of the above information).

            Priest David Moser
            St Seraphim of Sarov Orthodox Church (ROCOR)
          • Kiril Bart
            In USSR every pharmacy did carry sweet dry bulls blood as a vitamin and nutrition supplement and as a treat for kids, who never been thought about danger of
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 2, 2001
              In USSR every pharmacy did carry sweet dry bulls blood
              as a vitamin and nutrition supplement and as a treat
              for kids, who never been thought about danger of
              it(traditional Orthodox point of view).
              Subdeacon Kirill

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