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[orthodox-synod] Re: Sv: Sv: Concerning ... Rights and Duties ...

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  • Nikolaj
    to be Orthodox means to decide the question of government ... THANK you for confessing the truth about Holy Russia! Unfortunately my english is not good
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 1, 2000
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      " to be Orthodox means to decide the question of government
      >from the point of view of the Orthodox Church;
      that is, to consider as
      >genuine only that form of government which is
      both responsible to God and
      >God-pleasing. [Wherefore t]he Church came to
      love Autocracy because
      >supreme authority therein belongs to that which is
      least corrupted in the
      >sinful human nature -- one's
      conscience...."
       
      THANK you for confessing the truth about Holy Russia!
      Unfortunately my english is not good enough for this!
       
       
      "Bozhe, milostiv budi nam greshnym, v gresyekh nashykh, i pomilui nas!_ [O
      God, be merciful to us sinners in our sins, and have mercy upon us!] For
      how long, O Lord?... How long wilt Thou tolerate our sacrilege and our
      blasphemies? No wonder we still pine away in exile, "strangers in a
      strange land," as the Scriptures say."

      I weep with you brother!
       
      You are in my prayers
       
      In Christ
      imperfect Nikolaj
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Saturday, April 01, 2000 2:02 AM
      Subject: [orthodox-synod] Re: Sv: Concerning ... Rights and Duties ...


      At 07:21 AM 3/30/00 -0500, Antiquariu@... wrote:

      >1. The autocracy will not be restored

      Perhaps it will not... On the other hand, perhaps it *will*... It all
      depends on us, in the final analysis...

      God, by way of some of the greatest Saints ever to walk the Russian Land,
      *did* promise us (and that includes those of us in the Russian Diaspora, as
      well), that there *would* be a Tsar' in Russia once again. However, He
      also informed us that His promises are conditioned upon a Divine-human
      *synergy* (i.e., a cooperation between His will and ours). Thus, while God
      is certainly willing, we also have to do *our* part.

      And just what is our part? one might ask. It is a sincere repentance for
      our having fallen away from Christ and for having participated in the
      slaying of His Anointed One, whether through direct participation, or
      through acquiescence to the deed, or through justification of the same
      after the fact, as some on this List seem to be doing. For each mocking
      remark made, each slanderous word uttered against God's Anointed One, is a
      further participation in that dreadful sin of regicide; is the infliction
      of yet another additional wound to an Innocent Victim; is a further falling
      away from God!

      Much like the ancient Hebrews, we Russians, too, have been presented with a
      choice: God or Baal; the Way of Life or the Way of Death... Of Monarchy
      or of masonry... We are the arbiters of our own future destiny -- and,
      thereby, of the ultimate destiny of the world.

      If we Russians repent of our sins against God and against His Anointed One
      ("Touch not Mine Anointed"...), we will be given a brief respite before the
      End (..."and there was silence in Heaven, for the space of half an
      hour"...). Russia will flourish and the Word of God (which Dostoyevskii
      labelled "the New Russian Word") will go forth from there to all the earth
      (..."and this Gospel of the end will be preached unto all
      nations"...). And only then will the end come...

      But, if we do not repent, we may as well "bring down the Final Curtain"
      now, for it is true, then, that...

      >1. The autocracy will not be restored

      .....

      >2. Saint or not, nice guy or not, Nicholas II was not capable of leading
      >hungry troops to a chow hall,

      *Tsk!* *Tsk!* *Tsk!* For shame! For shame! This sort of
      communist-inspired "rhetoric" is entirely uncalled for, especially on a
      ROCOR List -- and, in particular, as the course of the war began to turn
      about when Tsar' Nikolai took over personal command in 1915, as is evident
      from the words of Winston Churchill (who was not particularly partial to
      Tsarist Russia, as we all know, wherefore his words bear that much more
      weight), who informs us:

      >Surely to no nation has fate been more malignant than to Russia. Her ship
      >went down in sight of port. She had actually weathered the storm when all
      >was cast away. Every sacrifice had been made; the toil was
      >achieved. Despair and Tyranny usurped command at the very moment when the
      >task was done.
      >
      >The long retreats were ended; the munition famine was broken; arms were
      >pouring in; stronger, larger, better equipped armies guarded the immense
      >front; the depots overflowed with strong men. Alexeiev directed the Army
      >and Koltchak the Fleet. Moreover, no difficult action was now required:
      >to remain in presence: to lean with heavy weight upon the far-stretched
      >Teutonic line: to hold without exceptional activity the weakened hostile
      >forces on her front: in a word, to endure -- that was all that stood
      >between Russia and the fruits of general victory. Says Ludendorff,
      >surveying the scene at the close of 1916: "Russia, in particular, produced
      >very strong formations, divisions were reduced to twelve battalions, the
      >batteries to six guns; new divisions were formed out of surplus fourth
      >battalions and the seventh and eighth guns of each battery. This
      >reorganization made a great increase of strength." (Ludendorff, Vol. I, p. 305)
      >
      >It meant in fact that the Russian Empire marshalled for the campaign of
      >1917 a far larger and better equipped army than that with which she had
      >started the war. In March the Czar was on his throne; the Russian Empire
      >and people stood, the front was safe, and victory certain.
      >
      >It is the shallow fashion of these times to dismiss the Czarist regime as
      >a purblind, corrupt, incompetent tyranny. But a survey of its thirty
      >month's war with Germany and Austria should correct these loose
      >impressions and expose the dominant facts. We may measure the strength of
      >the Russian Empire by the battering it endured, by the disasters it had
      >survived, by the inexhaustible forces it had developed, and by the
      >recovery it had made. In the governments of states, when great events are
      >afoot, the leader of the nation, whoever he be, is held accountable for
      >failures and vindicated by success. No matter who wrought the toil, who
      >planned the struggle, to the supreme responsible authority belongs the
      >blame or credit for the result.
      >
      >Why should this stern test be denied to Nicholas II? ... He was ... of
      >merciful disposition, upheld in all his daily life by his faith in
      >God. But the brunt of supreme decisions centered upon him. At the summit
      >where all problems are reduced to yea or nay, where events transcend the
      >faculties of men and where all is inscrutable, he had to give the
      >answers. His was the function of the compass-needle. War or no
      >war? Advance or retreat? Right or left? Democratize or hold firm? Quit
      >or persevere? These were the battlefields of Nicholas II. Why should he
      >reap no honour for them? The devoted onset of the Russian armies which
      >saved Paris in 1914; the mastered agony of the munitionless retreat; the
      >slowly regathered forces; the victories of Brussilov; the Russian entry
      >upon the campaign of 1917, unconquered, stronger than ever; has he no
      >share in these? ... [T]he regime he personified, over which he presided,
      >to which his personal character gave the vital spark, had at this moment
      >won the war for Russia.
      >
      >He is about to be struck down. A dark hand ... now intervenes. Exit
      >Czar. Deliver his and all he loved to wounds and death. Belittle his
      >efforts, asperse his conduct, insult his memory: but pause then and tell
      >us who else was found capable. Who or what could guide the Russian
      >State? Men gifted and daring; men ambitious and fierce; spirits audacious
      >and commanding -- of these there was no lack. But none could answer the
      >few plain questions on which the life and fame of Russia turned.

      (Excerpted from "The World Crisis, 1916 - 1918," pp. 223 - 225)

      Equally uncalled for is the appended slandering of Alexander III, the
      "Tsar'-Peacemaker" [_"Tsar'-Mirotvorets"_], by the epimethean verbal _post
      scriptum_:

      >and the same was true for his predecessor.

      For, _au contraire_, Alexander III was a great Tsar' who...

      >... reigned for only thirteen years. All these years were a time of
      >profound peace. The _Gosudar'_ [Sovereign] dedicated them to caring for
      >the betterment of Russia's domestic strength and prosperity. The military
      >was improved, several warships were built, a military harbour was
      >constructed in Libau. To ameliorate the well-being of the residents of
      >Siberia, the building of a railroad was begun through the whole of this
      >far-distant and remote _okraina_ [frontier region] of Russia. Peasant
      >banks were set up in many of the _gubernii_ [government districts] of the
      >Empire, which provided the peasants with loans to acquire
      >land.
      >
      >+++++ FINALLY, IN 1891 AND 1892, THE EMPEROR SAVED AN ENTIRE _KRAI_
      >[REGION] FROM FAMINE AND DEATH BY STARVATION; HE COMMANDED THAT SUPPLIES
      >FOR TWENTY _GUBERNII_ BE PURCHASED AT GOVERNMENT EXPENSE AND AT THE
      >EXPENSE OF PRIVATE TAX-PAYERS. THE HEIR TO THE THRONE, ... _GOSUDAR'_
      >EMPEROR NIKOLAI ALEKSANDROVICH AND THE ENTIRE IMPERIAL FAMILY LIKEWISE
      >TOOK PART IN THIS ACTIVITY. +++++ [This point, incidentally, puts the lie
      >to the *entirety* of Point 2, above...]
      >
      >
      >In addition, instead of [Russia's former] antiquated court system -- slow,
      >secret and [occasionally] unjust -- he established an open, public court
      >system -- "righteous, speedy, merciful and equal for all," of the _mir_
      >[village community] and circuit-court types, such as existed in other
      >_gubernii_ of Russia.
      >
      >Emperor Alexander III reposed on 20 October 1894, and was sincerely
      >lamented by his subjects.

      {Excerpted and translated into English by G. Spruksts, from the Russian
      text contained in _"Kratkaya Russkaya Istoriya v ocherkakh i biografiyakh"_
      ["A Concise History Of Russia In Sketches And Biographies"], compiled by
      Konstantin Voskresenskii, Edition 28, Reprinted by Archimandrite
      Panteleimon, Holy Trinity Monastery, Jordanville, NY,
      1958. English-language translation copyright (c) 1985 by The Russian
      Cultural Heritage Society and the Translator. All rights reserved.}

      Consequently, the conclusion drawn:

      >That was one of the big reasons they had a coupld of revolutions.

      is obviously a _non sequitur_, for "one of the big reasons they had a
      coupld {sic.} of revolutions" was because Holy Rus', "the Third Rome," the
      last bastion of Orthodoxy in the world, was the only power still capable of
      withstanding the encroaching masonic "New World Order." Consequently,
      "they" embarked upon their mission by "unleashing the dogs of war" (World
      War I) and, rephrasing it slightly, uttered Scipio Africanus' _dictum_:
      _"Russia delenda est!"_ ["Russia must be destroyed!"]. And what made
      Russia's destruction especially imperative was the fact that

      >"... The Orthodox ... Church, preaching the Christian doctrine of God's
      >Righteousness, has made [us]... aware that Orthodox ... Autocracy is the
      >best possible type of government upon our imperfect earth, being an
      >historically-justified form of divine authority: one established by God and
      >having a Tsar' -- God's Anointed -- at its head. ...
      >
      >"... [And, that] to be Orthodox means to decide the question of government
      >from the point of view of the Orthodox Church; that is, to consider as
      >genuine only that form of government which is both responsible to God and
      >God-pleasing. [Wherefore t]he Church came to love Autocracy because
      >supreme authority therein belongs to that which is least corrupted in the
      >sinful human nature -- one's conscience...."
      >
      >"...[For, being Anointed by the Church,] the Tsar' is guided ... by the
      >will of God and by his conscience, as the voice of God's will. The Nation
      >understands the burden of royal authority placed [upon the Tsar'] by God
      >as a great service to God and His Righteousness. The supreme goal of an
      >Orthodox system of government is to bring about those conditions of life
      >in which the [Orthodox] Christian can grow and develop. Therefore did
      >Orthodox thought come to a clear awareness of the necessity for an
      >authority guided by an Orthodox world-view -- an authority subject to God:
      >... Orthodox Autocratic Monarchy....
      >
      >"...[Hence, while] a[n Orthodox Christian] Tsar' is an unrestricted ruler,
      >... his power *is* limited [nevertheless] by [his] Orthodox world-view, and he
      >finds himself under the moral control of the Church and of the entire
      >Nation, before both of which he had sworn his [coronation] oath. The
      >principle of autocracy protects the Monarch's freedom; hence, also, the
      >potential for moral responsibility, for one who is unfree cannot be capable
      >of it. The unfree head of a parliamentarian ['constitutional'] monarchy
      >neither is, nor can be, morally responsible for his every action which has
      >both a juridical and a formal defence. Consequently, the primary moral
      >force of Orthodox Christian Monarchy is lost, and the principle of
      >autocratic rule falls by the wayside, making way for a "democratic state"
      >that is freed from any responsibilities in regard to God, the Church, and
      >the spiritual condition of the Nation [the masonic, _cum_ bolshevik,
      >principle of 'separation of Church and State']....
      >
      >"...[Then] does 'humanitarianism,' being an expression of a human _hubris_
      >which has convinced itself that it is capable of establishing social
      >well-being without Christ and without love for each and every human
      >individual, become a counterfeit substitute for the Righteousness of
      >Christ. ["I love humankind; it's _people_ that I can't stand!"]...
      >
      >"...[Any] move in this direction ... [i]s never so much political, as it is
      >spiritual. [And any] so-called ... 'liberation' -- and, thereafter,
      >'revolutionary' movement ...[i]s particularly an _a-religious_ and
      >*anti-religious* movement. It is specifically on account of this that
      >[they] have evoked such great alarm in Venerable Serafim of Sarov, in Fr.
      >Ioann of Kronstadt, in Dostoyevskii, in Metropolitan Antonii
      >(Khrapovitsii), [and in many others]....
      >
      >"...an Orthodox Tsar' [on the other hand] reigns in order that there might
      >exist an Orthodox-oriented milieu; that is the reason for a Tsar's bearing
      >[the burden] of his royal service. When the desire for a Christian state
      >and surroundings begins to fade in a nation, Orthodox Monarchy loses the
      >prerequisites for its existence and its _raison d'etre_. Whence comes the
      >self-evident condition for the appearance of Orthodox Monarchical rule,
      >which is only then possible when a nation again begins to manifest its
      >desire to live in accordance with Divine Righteousness."..

      {Excerpted and translated into English by G. Spruksts, from the Russian
      text of _"O Pravoslavnoi Monarkhii"_ ["Concerning Orthodox
      Monarchy"]. English-language translation copyright (c) 1993 by The Russian
      Cultural Heritage Society and the Translator. All rights reserved.}

      >3. Despite the admonitions of St Ignaty Brianchanninov (yep, the
      >Patriarchate has, as I understand it, canonized him), there seems to be a
      >real need for the "suffering Russian people" (at least the ones in the
      >diaspora) to get their miracles with bells

      Bells have always been an integral part of Russian religious
      life. Unfortunately, in Diaspora (alas!), zoning ordinances frequently
      make their use impossible... {Sigh!}

      >and whistles

      Sorry, but very few of "the 'suffering Russian people'" -- even "the ones
      in diaspora" -- are given to evoking _lyeshiye_ [wood demons] by whistling
      -- especially if their _babushka_s [grannies] are still alive to teach them
      what's what! It's primarily *the* _lyeshyiis_ "thynge" -- and not that of
      "the 'suffering Russian people'" -- to whistle, don'cha know?...

      >-- or "'streaming myrrh."

      Great, let's get rid of our miracle-working ikons and then let's jettison
      the relics of St. Nicholas (of Myra), St. Neilos (the Myrrh-streaming), St.
      Elizaveta Feodorovna, the Royal Martyr, et al. That will subsequently make
      it even easier to get rid of the "bread and wine" ("Alcoholics Anonymous"
      must be appeased, after all); and, finally, we can repudiate the
      "cruci-Fiction," too! Oh, yeah!...

      _Bozhe, milostiv budi nam greshnym, v gresyekh nashykh, i pomilui nas!_ [O
      God, be merciful to us sinners in our sins, and have mercy upon us!] For
      how long, O Lord?... How long wilt Thou tolerate our sacrilege and our
      blasphemies? No wonder we still pine away in exile, "strangers in a
      strange land," as the Scriptures say.

      >Get a life, folks.

      Only make certain that the "life" in question is of the "Eternal" variety,
      or it's good for nothing, being absolutely worthless...

      -- GeoS


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