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TIME Magazine: Putin's Reunited Russian Church

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  • David-Constantine Wright
    http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1622544,00.html Thursday, May. 17, 2007 Putin s Reunited Russian Church By Yuri Zarakhovich/Moscow The Russian
    Message 1 of 14 , May 18, 2007
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      http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1622544,00.html

      Thursday, May. 17, 2007

      Putin's Reunited Russian Church
      By Yuri Zarakhovich/Moscow

      The Russian Orthodox Church was torn in two by revolution and
      regicide, by the enmity between communism and capitalism, nearly a
      century of fulmination and hatred. That all formally ended on
      Thursday in Moscow. Thousands of the Russian Orthodox faithful —
      including several hundred who flew in from New York — lined up under
      heavy rain to get into the Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the Savior.
      There, they witnessed the restoration of the "Canonical Communion and
      Reunification" of the Moscow-based Russian Orthodox Church (ROC),
      which claims more than 70 million adherents, and the U.S.-based
      Russian Orthodox Church Abroad (ROCOR), which is believed to be 1.5
      million strong. Many among the clergy and laity wept at the end of
      the 86 year-old schism brought about by the 1917 Bolshevik
      revolution, and the ensuing murder of the dethroned Tsar and the
      forced emigration of hundred thousands Russians defeated in Civil
      war. While the sumptuous ritual was clearly an emotional and pious
      event, the reunification has political resonance as well because the
      Russian Orthodox Church is increasingly a symbol and projection of
      Russian nationalism.

      Indeed, rather than first give thanks to God in his speech, the head
      of the ROC, Patriarch Alexy, paid homage to Russian President
      Vladimir Putin. The Patriarch emphasized that the reunification could
      happen only because the ROCOR saw in Putin "a genuine Russian
      Orthodox human being." Putin responded in his speech that the
      reunification was a major event for the entire nation.
      Nationalism, based on the Orthodox faith, has been emerging as the
      Putin regime's major ideological resource. Thursday's rite sealed the
      four-year long effort by Putin, beginning in September 2003, to have
      the Moscow Patriarchate take over its rival American-based cousin and
      launch a new globalized Church as his state's main ideological arm
      and a vital foreign policy instrument. In February press conference,
      Putin equated Russia's "traditional confessions" to its nuclear
      shield, both, he said, being "components that strengthen Russian
      statehood and create necessary preconditions for internal and
      external security of the country." Professor Sergei Filatov, a top
      authority on Russian religious affairs notes that "traditional
      confessions" is the state's shorthand for the Russian Orthodox
      Church.

      The Church's assertiveness and presence is growing — with little
      separation from the State. The Moscow City Court and the Prosecutor
      General's Office maintain Orthodox chapels on their premises. Only
      the Orthodox clergy are entitled to give ecclesiastic guidance to the
      military. Some provinces have included Russian Orthodox Culture
      classes in school curricula with students doing church chores. When
      Orthodox fundamentalists vandalized an art exhibition at the Moscow
      Andrei Sakharov Center as "an insult to the main religion of our
      country," the Moscow Court found the Center managers guilty of
      insulting the faith, and fined them $3,500 each. The ROC had an
      opera, based on a famous fairy tale by the poet Alexander Pushkin,
      censored to the point of cutting out the priest, who is the tale's
      main protagonist. "Of course, we have a separation of State and
      Church," Putin said during a visit to a Russian Orthodox monastery in
      January 2004. "But in the people's soul they're together."
      The resurgence of a Church in open disdain of the secular
      Constitution is only likely to exacerbate divisions in a multi-ethnic
      and multi-religious Russia.

      The ROCOR's American clergy insist that they retain administrative
      independence over their churches even as they recognize the Moscow
      Patriarch as their Head. Filatov says that the ROCOR has "about as
      much [independence] as Eastern Europe's 'people's democracies' had in
      the Soviet bloc." One of the first tests of the new union will be in
      the Holy Land, where the ROCOR maintains religious properties — and
      has had run-ins with representatives of the Moscow patriarchate in
      the past. In 1997, for example, Yasser Arafat forcibly turned over
      the only Christian church in Hebron, run by the ROCOR, to the ROC.
      (That church includes the site where the Bible says Abraham met three
      angels.) The American-based Church still controls St. Mary Magdalene,
      with its seven gilded onion domes and Muscovite facade, one of the
      most prominent churches in Jerusalem because of its commanding spot
      on the slopes of the Mount of Olives above the garden of Gethsemane.
      The ROCOR also has a convent on the summit of the Mount of Olives, a
      monastery in the Judaean desert founded by a hermit in the third
      century, and one chapel in Jericho and another on the Jordan river.
      The Reunification deal says that the administration of these
      properties will not change. But some observers remain skeptical.

      With a reunited Russian Orthodox Church, Putin is pushing Russia's
      dominance in the global Orthodox movement, the traditional Orthodox
      leadership is vested in the Patriarch of Constantinople, in a first
      among equals style rather than the dominant Papal regime of the Roman
      Catholic Church. The Orthodox communion includes churches in Greece,
      Cyprus, Ukraine, Belarus and various Balkan states as well as
      Georgia, Armenia and Moldova. Historically, the Russian Orthodox
      Church has always pressed its pre-eminence among these nations and is
      likely to do so again. Putin's new unified Church will also further
      expand in the U.S. and Western Europe as it tries to use the ROCOR's
      network and congregation to become as much an arm of Russian
      nationalist politics as well as Russian piety. With Reporting by
      Andrew Lee Butters/Jerusalem
      -------------------------------------------------------------
      Forwarded by Rd. DC

      +------------------------------------------------------------+
      | Reader David-Constantine Wright |
      | http://constans_wright.tripod.com |
      +------------------------------------------------------------+
      | "God became Human so that human beings could become gods." |
      | ---- St. Athanasius the Great, *On the Incarnation* |
      +------------------------------------------------------------+
    • George
      this article is the worst sort of fearmongering and russophobia. it also appears to me to be strategic propaganda creating fear of both Orthodox Christians and
      Message 2 of 14 , May 18, 2007
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        this article is the worst sort of fearmongering and russophobia.

        it also appears to me to be strategic propaganda creating fear of both Orthodox Christians and Russians.

        George

        On Friday, May 18, 2007, at 04:59PM, "David-Constantine Wright" <constantinewright@...> wrote:
        >http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1622544,00.html
        >
        >Thursday, May. 17, 2007
        >
        >Putin's Reunited Russian Church
        >By Yuri Zarakhovich/Moscow
        >
        >The Russian Orthodox Church was torn in two by revolution and
        >regicide, by the enmity between communism and capitalism, nearly a
        >century of fulmination and hatred. That all formally ended on
        >Thursday in Moscow. Thousands of the Russian Orthodox faithful —
        >including several hundred who flew in from New York — lined up under
        >heavy rain to get into the Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the Savior.
        >There, they witnessed the restoration of the "Canonical Communion and
        >Reunification" of the Moscow-based Russian Orthodox Church (ROC),
        >which claims more than 70 million adherents, and the U.S.-based
        >Russian Orthodox Church Abroad (ROCOR), which is believed to be 1.5
        >million strong. Many among the clergy and laity wept at the end of
        >the 86 year-old schism brought about by the 1917 Bolshevik
        >revolution, and the ensuing murder of the dethroned Tsar and the
        >forced emigration of hundred thousands Russians defeated in Civil
        >war. While the sumptuous ritual was clearly an emotional and pious
        > event, the reunification has political resonance as well because the
        >Russian Orthodox Church is increasingly a symbol and projection of
        >Russian nationalism.
        >
        >Indeed, rather than first give thanks to God in his speech, the head
        >of the ROC, Patriarch Alexy, paid homage to Russian President
        >Vladimir Putin. The Patriarch emphasized that the reunification could
        >happen only because the ROCOR saw in Putin "a genuine Russian
        >Orthodox human being." Putin responded in his speech that the
        >reunification was a major event for the entire nation.
        >Nationalism, based on the Orthodox faith, has been emerging as the
        >Putin regime's major ideological resource. Thursday's rite sealed the
        >four-year long effort by Putin, beginning in September 2003, to have
        >the Moscow Patriarchate take over its rival American-based cousin and
        >launch a new globalized Church as his state's main ideological arm
        >and a vital foreign policy instrument. In February press conference,
        >Putin equated Russia's "traditional confessions" to its nuclear
        >shield, both, he said, being "components that strengthen Russian
        >statehood and create necessary preconditions for internal and
        >external security of the country." Professor Sergei Filatov, a top
        >authority on Russian religious affairs notes that "traditional
        >confessions" is the state's shorthand for the Russian Orthodox
        >Church.
        >
        >The Church's assertiveness and presence is growing — with little
        >separation from the State. The Moscow City Court and the Prosecutor
        >General's Office maintain Orthodox chapels on their premises. Only
        >the Orthodox clergy are entitled to give ecclesiastic guidance to the
        >military. Some provinces have included Russian Orthodox Culture
        >classes in school curricula with students doing church chores. When
        >Orthodox fundamentalists vandalized an art exhibition at the Moscow
        >Andrei Sakharov Center as "an insult to the main religion of our
        >country," the Moscow Court found the Center managers guilty of
        >insulting the faith, and fined them $3,500 each. The ROC had an
        >opera, based on a famous fairy tale by the poet Alexander Pushkin,
        >censored to the point of cutting out the priest, who is the tale's
        >main protagonist. "Of course, we have a separation of State and
        >Church," Putin said during a visit to a Russian Orthodox monastery in
        >January 2004. "But in the people's soul they're together."
        > The resurgence of a Church in open disdain of the secular
        >Constitution is only likely to exacerbate divisions in a multi-ethnic
        >and multi-religious Russia.
        >
        >The ROCOR's American clergy insist that they retain administrative
        >independence over their churches even as they recognize the Moscow
        >Patriarch as their Head. Filatov says that the ROCOR has "about as
        >much [independence] as Eastern Europe's 'people's democracies' had in
        >the Soviet bloc." One of the first tests of the new union will be in
        >the Holy Land, where the ROCOR maintains religious properties — and
        >has had run-ins with representatives of the Moscow patriarchate in
        >the past. In 1997, for example, Yasser Arafat forcibly turned over
        >the only Christian church in Hebron, run by the ROCOR, to the ROC.
        >(That church includes the site where the Bible says Abraham met three
        >angels.) The American-based Church still controls St. Mary Magdalene,
        >with its seven gilded onion domes and Muscovite facade, one of the
        >most prominent churches in Jerusalem because of its commanding spot
        >on the slopes of the Mount of Olives above the garden of Gethsemane.
        >The ROCOR also has a convent on the summit of the Mount of Olives, a
        >monastery in the Judaean desert founded by a hermit in the third
        >century, and one chapel in Jericho and another on the Jordan river.
        >The Reunification deal says that the administration of these
        >properties will not change. But some observers remain skeptical.
        >
        >With a reunited Russian Orthodox Church, Putin is pushing Russia's
        >dominance in the global Orthodox movement, the traditional Orthodox
        >leadership is vested in the Patriarch of Constantinople, in a first
        >among equals style rather than the dominant Papal regime of the Roman
        >Catholic Church. The Orthodox communion includes churches in Greece,
        >Cyprus, Ukraine, Belarus and various Balkan states as well as
        >Georgia, Armenia and Moldova. Historically, the Russian Orthodox
        >Church has always pressed its pre-eminence among these nations and is
        >likely to do so again. Putin's new unified Church will also further
        >expand in the U.S. and Western Europe as it tries to use the ROCOR's
        >network and congregation to become as much an arm of Russian
        >nationalist politics as well as Russian piety. With Reporting by
        >Andrew Lee Butters/Jerusalem
        >-------------------------------------------------------------
        >Forwarded by Rd. DC
        >
        >+------------------------------------------------------------+
        >| Reader David-Constantine Wright |
        >| http://constans_wright.tripod.com |
        >+------------------------------------------------------------+
        >| "God became Human so that human beings could become gods." |
        >| ---- St. Athanasius the Great, *On the Incarnation* |
        >+------------------------------------------------------------+
        >
        >
      • KCIN12
        I agree, I was wondering why it was posted without a comment, since it was as you stated: fearmongering and russophobia . Google search for the reportor and
        Message 3 of 14 , May 19, 2007
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          I agree, I was wondering why it was posted without a comment, since
          it was as you stated: "fearmongering and russophobia".
          Google search for the reportor and you will see more of this.

          Posted by Nick Berezniak





          -- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, George <kharaku@...> wrote:
          >
          > this article is the worst sort of fearmongering and russophobia.
          >
          > it also appears to me to be strategic propaganda creating fear of
          both Orthodox Christians and Russians.
          >
          > George
          >
          > On Friday, May 18, 2007, at 04:59PM, "David-Constantine Wright"
          <constantinewright@...> wrote:
          > >http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1622544,00.html
          > >
          > >Thursday, May. 17, 2007
          > >
          > >Putin's Reunited Russian Church
          > >By Yuri Zarakhovich/Moscow
          > >
          > >The Russian Orthodox Church was torn in two by revolution and
          > >regicide, by the enmity between communism and capitalism, nearly a
          > >century of fulmination and hatred. That all formally ended on
          > >Thursday in Moscow. Thousands of the Russian Orthodox faithful â€"
          > >including several hundred who flew in from New York â€" lined up
          under
          > >heavy rain to get into the Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the
          Savior.
          > >There, they witnessed the restoration of the "Canonical Communion
          and
          > >Reunification" of the Moscow-based Russian Orthodox Church (ROC),
          > >which claims more than 70 million adherents, and the U.S.-based
          > >Russian Orthodox Church Abroad (ROCOR), which is believed to be
          1.5
          > >million strong. Many among the clergy and laity wept at the end of
          > >the 86 year-old schism brought about by the 1917 Bolshevik
          > >revolution, and the ensuing murder of the dethroned Tsar and the
          > >forced emigration of hundred thousands Russians defeated in Civil
          > >war. While the sumptuous ritual was clearly an emotional and pious
          > > event, the reunification has political resonance as well because
          the
          > >Russian Orthodox Church is increasingly a symbol and projection of
          > >Russian nationalism.
          > >
          > >Indeed, rather than first give thanks to God in his speech, the
          head
          > >of the ROC, Patriarch Alexy, paid homage to Russian President
          > >Vladimir Putin. The Patriarch emphasized that the reunification
          could
          > >happen only because the ROCOR saw in Putin "a genuine Russian
          > >Orthodox human being." Putin responded in his speech that the
          > >reunification was a major event for the entire nation.
          > >Nationalism, based on the Orthodox faith, has been emerging as the
          > >Putin regime's major ideological resource. Thursday's rite sealed
          the
          > >four-year long effort by Putin, beginning in September 2003, to
          have
          > >the Moscow Patriarchate take over its rival American-based cousin
          and
          > >launch a new globalized Church as his state's main ideological arm
          > >and a vital foreign policy instrument. In February press
          conference,
          > >Putin equated Russia's "traditional confessions" to its nuclear
          > >shield, both, he said, being "components that strengthen Russian
          > >statehood and create necessary preconditions for internal and
          > >external security of the country." Professor Sergei Filatov, a top
          > >authority on Russian religious affairs notes that "traditional
          > >confessions" is the state's shorthand for the Russian Orthodox
          > >Church.
          > >
          > >The Church's assertiveness and presence is growing â€" with little
          > >separation from the State. The Moscow City Court and the
          Prosecutor
          > >General's Office maintain Orthodox chapels on their premises. Only
          > >the Orthodox clergy are entitled to give ecclesiastic guidance to
          the
          > >military. Some provinces have included Russian Orthodox Culture
          > >classes in school curricula with students doing church chores.
          When
          > >Orthodox fundamentalists vandalized an art exhibition at the
          Moscow
          > >Andrei Sakharov Center as "an insult to the main religion of our
          > >country," the Moscow Court found the Center managers guilty of
          > >insulting the faith, and fined them $3,500 each. The ROC had an
          > >opera, based on a famous fairy tale by the poet Alexander Pushkin,
          > >censored to the point of cutting out the priest, who is the tale's
          > >main protagonist. "Of course, we have a separation of State and
          > >Church," Putin said during a visit to a Russian Orthodox monastery
          in
          > >January 2004. "But in the people's soul they're together."
          > > The resurgence of a Church in open disdain of the secular
          > >Constitution is only likely to exacerbate divisions in a multi-
          ethnic
          > >and multi-religious Russia.
          > >
          > >The ROCOR's American clergy insist that they retain administrative
          > >independence over their churches even as they recognize the Moscow
          > >Patriarch as their Head. Filatov says that the ROCOR has "about as
          > >much [independence] as Eastern Europe's 'people's democracies' had
          in
          > >the Soviet bloc." One of the first tests of the new union will be
          in
          > >the Holy Land, where the ROCOR maintains religious properties â€"
          and
          > >has had run-ins with representatives of the Moscow patriarchate in
          > >the past. In 1997, for example, Yasser Arafat forcibly turned over
          > >the only Christian church in Hebron, run by the ROCOR, to the ROC.
          > >(That church includes the site where the Bible says Abraham met
          three
          > >angels.) The American-based Church still controls St. Mary
          Magdalene,
          > >with its seven gilded onion domes and Muscovite facade, one of the
          > >most prominent churches in Jerusalem because of its commanding
          spot
          > >on the slopes of the Mount of Olives above the garden of
          Gethsemane.
          > >The ROCOR also has a convent on the summit of the Mount of Olives,
          a
          > >monastery in the Judaean desert founded by a hermit in the third
          > >century, and one chapel in Jericho and another on the Jordan
          river.
          > >The Reunification deal says that the administration of these
          > >properties will not change. But some observers remain skeptical.
          > >
          > >With a reunited Russian Orthodox Church, Putin is pushing Russia's
          > >dominance in the global Orthodox movement, the traditional
          Orthodox
          > >leadership is vested in the Patriarch of Constantinople, in a
          first
          > >among equals style rather than the dominant Papal regime of the
          Roman
          > >Catholic Church. The Orthodox communion includes churches in
          Greece,
          > >Cyprus, Ukraine, Belarus and various Balkan states as well as
          > >Georgia, Armenia and Moldova. Historically, the Russian Orthodox
          > >Church has always pressed its pre-eminence among these nations and
          is
          > >likely to do so again. Putin's new unified Church will also
          further
          > >expand in the U.S. and Western Europe as it tries to use the
          ROCOR's
          > >network and congregation to become as much an arm of Russian
          > >nationalist politics as well as Russian piety. With Reporting by
          > >Andrew Lee Butters/Jerusalem
          > >-------------------------------------------------------------
          > >Forwarded by Rd. DC
          > >
          > >+------------------------------------------------------------+
          > >| Reader David-Constantine Wright |
          > >| http://constans_wright.tripod.com |
          > >+------------------------------------------------------------+
          > >| "God became Human so that human beings could become gods." |
          > >| ---- St. Athanasius the Great, *On the Incarnation* |
          > >+------------------------------------------------------------+
          > >
          > >
          >
        • DDD
          On Fri, 18 May 2007 14:13:16 -0700, Davod-C. Wright wrote:  The Church s assertiveness and presence is growing — with little  separation from the
          Message 4 of 14 , May 19, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            On Fri, 18 May 2007 14:13:16 -0700, Davod-C. Wright wrote:
            �The Church's assertiveness and presence is growing — with little
            �separation from the State.
            _______________________________________________________________

            DD: How much "separation from the State" did the Russian Orthodox Church have before the Revolution? For that matter, who called the First Ecumenical Council? (hint: the Head of State).

            DCW's post emphasizes what I have been saying all along: that this kind of fear-and hate-mongering against Russia will accomplish EXACTLY what the Bolshevik's did in 1917: it will make people hate a future pious, Orthodox Tsar and try to overthrow him--in the name of "democracy." Everyone who is expecting "repentance" from the Russian people for the overthrow of the last Tsar (which they have given and continue to give) should take a good look at themselves, and whether they, too, need repentance for wanting to overthrow the next Tsar.

            DCW claims that the Patriarch thanked President Putin before he thanked God. I'd have to take a look at the speech, but I can ask you all: Are you thanking God, yourselves, for this great event and for the fact that the President of Russia is *helping* the Orthodox Church?

            Everyone raise your hands who are thanking God for the Reunification and for the fact that Russia's President is helping the Church! ("aye!" from me)

            However, the Social Concept of the Russian Orthodox Church, 2000, said there should, indeed, be separation of Church and State. That does not mean that the State cannot help the Church, does it? Everyone raise their hands here who does NOT want Russia to help the Church!
            Everyone raise their hands who DOES want Russia to help the Church! ("aye!" from me)

            --Dimitra Dwelley
          • blinachka
            I agree with you George! It doesn t surprise me considerinig the source! (the liberal rag Time ) I for one am very pleased with it all and am looking forward
            Message 5 of 14 , May 19, 2007
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              I agree with you George! It doesn't surprise me considerinig the
              source! (the liberal rag "Time")

              I for one am very pleased with it all and am looking forward to my
              sister Elizabeth's return home so she can fill me in on what it was
              like to be there!

              -Nina Ledkovsky

              --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, George <kharaku@...> wrote:
              >
              > this article is the worst sort of fearmongering and russophobia.
              >
              > it also appears to me to be strategic propaganda creating fear of
              both Orthodox Christians and Russians.
              >
              > George
              >
              > On Friday, May 18, 2007, at 04:59PM, "David-Constantine Wright"
              <constantinewright@...> wrote:
              > >http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1622544,00.html
              > >
              > >Thursday, May. 17, 2007
              > >
              > >Putin's Reunited Russian Church
              > >By Yuri Zarakhovich/Moscow
              > >
              > >The Russian Orthodox Church was torn in two by revolution and
              > >regicide, by the enmity between communism and capitalism, nearly a
              > >century of fulmination and hatred. That all formally ended on
              > >Thursday in Moscow. Thousands of the Russian Orthodox faithful â€"
              > >including several hundred who flew in from New York â€" lined up
              under
              > >heavy rain to get into the Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the
              Savior.
              > >There, they witnessed the restoration of the "Canonical Communion
              and
              > >Reunification" of the Moscow-based Russian Orthodox Church (ROC),
              > >which claims more than 70 million adherents, and the U.S.-based
              > >Russian Orthodox Church Abroad (ROCOR), which is believed to be
              1.5
              > >million strong. Many among the clergy and laity wept at the end of
              > >the 86 year-old schism brought about by the 1917 Bolshevik
              > >revolution, and the ensuing murder of the dethroned Tsar and the
              > >forced emigration of hundred thousands Russians defeated in Civil
              > >war. While the sumptuous ritual was clearly an emotional and pious
              > > event, the reunification has political resonance as well because
              the
              > >Russian Orthodox Church is increasingly a symbol and projection of
              > >Russian nationalism.
              > >
              > >Indeed, rather than first give thanks to God in his speech, the
              head
              > >of the ROC, Patriarch Alexy, paid homage to Russian President
              > >Vladimir Putin. The Patriarch emphasized that the reunification
              could
              > >happen only because the ROCOR saw in Putin "a genuine Russian
              > >Orthodox human being." Putin responded in his speech that the
              > >reunification was a major event for the entire nation.
              > >Nationalism, based on the Orthodox faith, has been emerging as the
              > >Putin regime's major ideological resource. Thursday's rite sealed
              the
              > >four-year long effort by Putin, beginning in September 2003, to
              have
              > >the Moscow Patriarchate take over its rival American-based cousin
              and
              > >launch a new globalized Church as his state's main ideological arm
              > >and a vital foreign policy instrument. In February press
              conference,
              > >Putin equated Russia's "traditional confessions" to its nuclear
              > >shield, both, he said, being "components that strengthen Russian
              > >statehood and create necessary preconditions for internal and
              > >external security of the country." Professor Sergei Filatov, a top
              > >authority on Russian religious affairs notes that "traditional
              > >confessions" is the state's shorthand for the Russian Orthodox
              > >Church.
              > >
              > >The Church's assertiveness and presence is growing â€" with little
              > >separation from the State. The Moscow City Court and the
              Prosecutor
              > >General's Office maintain Orthodox chapels on their premises. Only
              > >the Orthodox clergy are entitled to give ecclesiastic guidance to
              the
              > >military. Some provinces have included Russian Orthodox Culture
              > >classes in school curricula with students doing church chores.
              When
              > >Orthodox fundamentalists vandalized an art exhibition at the
              Moscow
              > >Andrei Sakharov Center as "an insult to the main religion of our
              > >country," the Moscow Court found the Center managers guilty of
              > >insulting the faith, and fined them $3,500 each. The ROC had an
              > >opera, based on a famous fairy tale by the poet Alexander Pushkin,
              > >censored to the point of cutting out the priest, who is the tale's
              > >main protagonist. "Of course, we have a separation of State and
              > >Church," Putin said during a visit to a Russian Orthodox monastery
              in
              > >January 2004. "But in the people's soul they're together."
              > > The resurgence of a Church in open disdain of the secular
              > >Constitution is only likely to exacerbate divisions in a multi-
              ethnic
              > >and multi-religious Russia.
              > >
              > >The ROCOR's American clergy insist that they retain administrative
              > >independence over their churches even as they recognize the Moscow
              > >Patriarch as their Head. Filatov says that the ROCOR has "about as
              > >much [independence] as Eastern Europe's 'people's democracies' had
              in
              > >the Soviet bloc." One of the first tests of the new union will be
              in
              > >the Holy Land, where the ROCOR maintains religious properties â€"
              and
              > >has had run-ins with representatives of the Moscow patriarchate in
              > >the past. In 1997, for example, Yasser Arafat forcibly turned over
              > >the only Christian church in Hebron, run by the ROCOR, to the ROC.
              > >(That church includes the site where the Bible says Abraham met
              three
              > >angels.) The American-based Church still controls St. Mary
              Magdalene,
              > >with its seven gilded onion domes and Muscovite facade, one of the
              > >most prominent churches in Jerusalem because of its commanding
              spot
              > >on the slopes of the Mount of Olives above the garden of
              Gethsemane.
              > >The ROCOR also has a convent on the summit of the Mount of Olives,
              a
              > >monastery in the Judaean desert founded by a hermit in the third
              > >century, and one chapel in Jericho and another on the Jordan
              river.
              > >The Reunification deal says that the administration of these
              > >properties will not change. But some observers remain skeptical.
              > >
              > >With a reunited Russian Orthodox Church, Putin is pushing Russia's
              > >dominance in the global Orthodox movement, the traditional
              Orthodox
              > >leadership is vested in the Patriarch of Constantinople, in a
              first
              > >among equals style rather than the dominant Papal regime of the
              Roman
              > >Catholic Church. The Orthodox communion includes churches in
              Greece,
              > >Cyprus, Ukraine, Belarus and various Balkan states as well as
              > >Georgia, Armenia and Moldova. Historically, the Russian Orthodox
              > >Church has always pressed its pre-eminence among these nations and
              is
              > >likely to do so again. Putin's new unified Church will also
              further
              > >expand in the U.S. and Western Europe as it tries to use the
              ROCOR's
              > >network and congregation to become as much an arm of Russian
              > >nationalist politics as well as Russian piety. With Reporting by
              > >Andrew Lee Butters/Jerusalem
              > >-------------------------------------------------------------
              > >Forwarded by Rd. DC
              > >
              > >+------------------------------------------------------------+
              > >| Reader David-Constantine Wright |
              > >| http://constans_wright.tripod.com |
              > >+------------------------------------------------------------+
              > >| "God became Human so that human beings could become gods." |
              > >| ---- St. Athanasius the Great, *On the Incarnation* |
              > >+------------------------------------------------------------+
              > >
              > >
              >
            • Theodora
              This article is from TIME. It was not written by the poster. I read this article on many sites and not just here. In this country one event can be seen by
              Message 6 of 14 , May 20, 2007
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                This article is from TIME. It was not written by the poster. I read this
                article on many sites and not just here. In this country one event can be
                seen by six people and be reported in six ways. Unlike other countries
                where media is controlled. There are those who support the union and all
                things Russian and those who are going slowly and seeing the Fruits. A
                discussion on the article is good. I emphasize, on the article. I try to
                follow all sides, and there are more than two, in the posts here but often
                it is hard as some forget many things they differ with are articles posted
                by different people who just post with no comment. Which, by the way,
                posters are often told that is exactly what should be done. So, discussion
                of the article is good. Just understand that there will be different
                outlooks of what was said and perhaps not the way one thinks. Personally, I
                don't think TIME is the son of the devil. Just a way of seeing many
                subjects discussed with a difference reference. There are other media mag.
                and papers, etc and reading a wide range should not be considered evil or
                non Orthodox. At least not in this country as of yet.

                Theodora in The Mountains
              • Theodora
                I only saw a line scroll on the telly news here concerning this event. While a visual report showed the thousands protesting in Turkey today to keep a secular
                Message 7 of 14 , May 20, 2007
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                  I only saw a line scroll on the telly news here concerning this event.
                  While a visual report showed the thousands protesting in Turkey today to
                  keep a secular governement and not a radical Islam governement which does
                  pretain to Orthodoxy as does the report on the fact that Jordan and perhaps
                  another country (can't remember which one) pulled support for the Pat. of
                  Jer. which he must have to be Pat. Now both these reports are good for
                  needful knowledge for the Orthodox of the world. But no one reports or
                  discusses these things. There are many events now happening that will have
                  a mark on Orthodoxy. This is the Synod list and should not be the sand to
                  hide ones head in but a discussion group. I seem to remember when all this
                  unity started those that said it would happen were really jumped on, like
                  called names and told they were "chicken little". It has happened as was
                  said. There will be different views even in the ROCOR. By the way, what
                  will ROCOR be called now? It seems that title is rather out of fashion now.
                  Does anyone know?

                  Theodora in The Mountains
                • DDD
                  On Sun, 20 May 2007 20:31:55 -0400, Theodora wrote:  By the way, what  will ROCOR be called now? It seems that title is rather out of  fashion now.
                  Message 8 of 14 , May 20, 2007
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                    On Sun, 20 May 2007 20:31:55 -0400, Theodora wrote:

                    �By the way, what
                    �will ROCOR be called now? It seems that title is rather out of
                    �fashion now.
                    _______________________________________________________________

                    It does? Here is our official web site--note the title of the Church at the top of the home page:

                    http://www.russianorthodoxchurch.ws/synod/indexeng.htm

                    Here is the Act of Canonical Communion--note that it refers to the "Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia."

                    Hope that answers your.... question.

                    Christ is ascended!


                    --DImitra Dwelley
                  • David-Constantine Wright
                    ... According to the reports, there were at least 20,000 protesting in Turkey. That s a good example to keep in mind, especially when one compares that to the
                    Message 9 of 14 , May 21, 2007
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                      --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, "Theodora" <theomtn@...>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      >While a visual report showed the thousands protesting in Turkey
                      >today to keep a secular governement and not a radical Islam
                      >governement

                      According to the reports, there were at least 20,000 protesting in
                      Turkey. That's a good example to keep in mind, especially when one
                      compares that to the similar events recently in Russia.

                      Oh, that's right... similar events couldn't happen in Russia,
                      because the Russian State with its Police prohibited the Russian
                      people from exercising their freedom and right to assemble and
                      protest... the Russian Government denied Kasparov his freedom and
                      right of movement... at least eight journalists resigned recently
                      because the Russian Government is working to prohibit freedom of
                      speech and of the press.

                      And that's the government controlling the MP now.

                      In Christ Made Flesh,
                      Rd. DC

                      +------------------------------------------------------------+
                      | Reader David-Constantine Wright |
                      | http://constans_wright.tripod.com |
                      +------------------------------------------------------------+
                      | "God became Human so that human beings could become gods." |
                      | ---- St. Athanasius the Great, *On the Incarnation* |
                      +------------------------------------------------------------+
                    • Aleksandr Andreev
                      ... because the Russian State with its Police prohibited the Russian people from exercising their freedom and right to assemble and protest Have you been to
                      Message 10 of 14 , May 21, 2007
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                        >> Oh, that's right... similar events couldn't happen in Russia,
                        because the Russian State with its Police prohibited the Russian
                        people from exercising their freedom and right to assemble and
                        protest

                        Have you been to Russia recently? Have you seen the "State" with its
                        "Police" prohibiting people "from exercising their freedom and right
                        to assemble"? Perhaps you've also seen the thousands of pro-Putin
                        demonstrators on the streets (not covered by Western media). And,
                        unlike Kasparov, who is paid by Western "think tanks" striving to
                        "build democracy in Russia" (read striving to weaken Russia), they
                        take to the streets voluntarily.

                        Before making claims about what life in Russia is like, I invite you
                        to come and see.

                        A

                        ---------
                        Aleksandr Andreev
                        St Petersburg State University
                        School of Management
                      • Theodora
                        The kind that has a mother who does emb. icons and was blessed to give this quilt with icons for all the Feast Days to her son before she reposes so that he
                        Message 11 of 14 , Jun 4, 2007
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                          The kind that has a mother who does emb. icons and was blessed to give this
                          "quilt" with icons for all the Feast Days to her son before she reposes so
                          that he would have a sample of her work as a remembrance (which I told was
                          quiet permissible) This is done is the tradition of older Orthodoxy
                          needlework in several countries throughout the world and is in no way a
                          "freak" thing and date far back in Orthodox culture. Lord have mercy on you
                          and your lack of understanding of our Faith. And your lack of compassion
                          and love as is seen in all your posts to whomever you dislike.

                          Theodora in The Mountains who is seriously considering leaving this Church.

                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: "Ryan Thompson" <ryan_mpls75@...>
                          To: <orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Friday, May 18, 2007 6:17 PM
                          Subject: Re: [orthodox-synod] TIME Magazine: Putin's Reunited Russian Church


                          Okay Constantine.... what kind of freak has an icon quilt and a cross made
                          of M&Ms in his icon corner.

                          See the picture on Reader Constatine's webpage.

                          http://constans_wright.tripod.com/

                          David-Constantine Wright <constantinewright@...> wrote:
                          http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1622544,00.html

                          Thursday, May. 17, 2007

                          Putin's Reunited Russian Church
                          By Yuri Zarakhovich/Moscow

                          The Russian Orthodox Church was torn in two by revolution and
                          regicide, by the enmity between communism and capitalism, nearly a
                          century of fulmination and hatred. That all formally ended on
                          Thursday in Moscow. Thousands of the Russian Orthodox faithful -
                          including several hundred who flew in from New York - lined up under
                          heavy rain to get into the Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the Savior.
                          There, they witnessed the restoration of the "Canonical Communion and
                          Reunification" of the Moscow-based Russian Orthodox Church (ROC),
                          which claims more than 70 million adherents, and the U.S.-based
                          Russian Orthodox Church Abroad (ROCOR), which is believed to be 1.5
                          million strong. Many among the clergy and laity wept at the end of
                          the 86 year-old schism brought about by the 1917 Bolshevik
                          revolution, and the ensuing murder of the dethroned Tsar and the
                          forced emigration of hundred thousands Russians defeated in Civil
                          war. While the sumptuous ritual was clearly an emotional and pious
                          event, the reunification has political resonance as well because the
                          Russian Orthodox Church is increasingly a symbol and projection of
                          Russian nationalism.

                          Indeed, rather than first give thanks to God in his speech, the head
                          of the ROC, Patriarch Alexy, paid homage to Russian President
                          Vladimir Putin. The Patriarch emphasized that the reunification could
                          happen only because the ROCOR saw in Putin "a genuine Russian
                          Orthodox human being." Putin responded in his speech that the
                          reunification was a major event for the entire nation.
                          Nationalism, based on the Orthodox faith, has been emerging as the
                          Putin regime's major ideological resource. Thursday's rite sealed the
                          four-year long effort by Putin, beginning in September 2003, to have
                          the Moscow Patriarchate take over its rival American-based cousin and
                          launch a new globalized Church as his state's main ideological arm
                          and a vital foreign policy instrument. In February press conference,
                          Putin equated Russia's "traditional confessions" to its nuclear
                          shield, both, he said, being "components that strengthen Russian
                          statehood and create necessary preconditions for internal and
                          external security of the country." Professor Sergei Filatov, a top
                          authority on Russian religious affairs notes that "traditional
                          confessions" is the state's shorthand for the Russian Orthodox
                          Church.

                          The Church's assertiveness and presence is growing - with little
                          separation from the State. The Moscow City Court and the Prosecutor
                          General's Office maintain Orthodox chapels on their premises. Only
                          the Orthodox clergy are entitled to give ecclesiastic guidance to the
                          military. Some provinces have included Russian Orthodox Culture
                          classes in school curricula with students doing church chores. When
                          Orthodox fundamentalists vandalized an art exhibition at the Moscow
                          Andrei Sakharov Center as "an insult to the main religion of our
                          country," the Moscow Court found the Center managers guilty of
                          insulting the faith, and fined them $3,500 each. The ROC had an
                          opera, based on a famous fairy tale by the poet Alexander Pushkin,
                          censored to the point of cutting out the priest, who is the tale's
                          main protagonist. "Of course, we have a separation of State and
                          Church," Putin said during a visit to a Russian Orthodox monastery in
                          January 2004. "But in the people's soul they're together."
                          The resurgence of a Church in open disdain of the secular
                          Constitution is only likely to exacerbate divisions in a multi-ethnic
                          and multi-religious Russia.

                          The ROCOR's American clergy insist that they retain administrative
                          independence over their churches even as they recognize the Moscow
                          Patriarch as their Head. Filatov says that the ROCOR has "about as
                          much [independence] as Eastern Europe's 'people's democracies' had in
                          the Soviet bloc." One of the first tests of the new union will be in
                          the Holy Land, where the ROCOR maintains religious properties - and
                          has had run-ins with representatives of the Moscow patriarchate in
                          the past. In 1997, for example, Yasser Arafat forcibly turned over
                          the only Christian church in Hebron, run by the ROCOR, to the ROC.
                          (That church includes the site where the Bible says Abraham met three
                          angels.) The American-based Church still controls St. Mary Magdalene,
                          with its seven gilded onion domes and Muscovite facade, one of the
                          most prominent churches in Jerusalem because of its commanding spot
                          on the slopes of the Mount of Olives above the garden of Gethsemane.
                          The ROCOR also has a convent on the summit of the Mount of Olives, a
                          monastery in the Judaean desert founded by a hermit in the third
                          century, and one chapel in Jericho and another on the Jordan river.
                          The Reunification deal says that the administration of these
                          properties will not change. But some observers remain skeptical.

                          With a reunited Russian Orthodox Church, Putin is pushing Russia's
                          dominance in the global Orthodox movement, the traditional Orthodox
                          leadership is vested in the Patriarch of Constantinople, in a first
                          among equals style rather than the dominant Papal regime of the Roman
                          Catholic Church. The Orthodox communion includes churches in Greece,
                          Cyprus, Ukraine, Belarus and various Balkan states as well as
                          Georgia, Armenia and Moldova. Historically, the Russian Orthodox
                          Church has always pressed its pre-eminence among these nations and is
                          likely to do so again. Putin's new unified Church will also further
                          expand in the U.S. and Western Europe as it tries to use the ROCOR's
                          network and congregation to become as much an arm of Russian
                          nationalist politics as well as Russian piety. With Reporting by
                          Andrew Lee Butters/Jerusalem
                          ----------------------------------------------------------
                          Forwarded by Rd. DC

                          +----------------------------------------------------------+
                          | Reader David-Constantine Wright |
                          | http://constans_wright.tripod.com |
                          +----------------------------------------------------------+
                          | "God became Human so that human beings could become gods." |
                          | ---- St. Athanasius the Great, *On the Incarnation* |
                          +----------------------------------------------------------+






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                        • Theodora
                          Ah, what a world. In case someone else wants to shout about the quilt . I said icons for the Feast Days but they are really not.........forgive....but
                          Message 12 of 14 , Jun 4, 2007
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                            Ah, what a world. In case someone else wants to shout about the "quilt". I
                            said "icons" for the Feast Days but they are really
                            not.........forgive....but they are embr. designs for the Feast Days. I
                            don't think I will go to hell for this but should anyone think so, I am
                            sorry for you. You don't have to look at it. So enough said. The cross
                            also is not candy in any way. Lord have mercy. There are many tile icons
                            in use from these tiny ones to large one in Orthodoxy. From inlay to
                            mosaics it is an old tradition and can be found on crosses to tables to
                            windows, etc. Now, if anyone wants to post me privately I will try to
                            explain if I have not been clear as to my sewing. If you want to see more
                            you can go to my site.

                            http://jennelou.tripod.com/


                            Lord be with us all.

                            Theodora in The Mountains

                            snip
                          • David-Constantine Wright
                            ... give this ... reposes so ... told was ... Orthodoxy ... way a ... mercy on you ... compassion ... Don t let the leagalistic pharisees get you down. One
                            Message 13 of 14 , Jun 5, 2007
                            • 0 Attachment
                              --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, "Theodora" <theomtn@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > The kind that has a mother who does emb. icons and was blessed to
                              give this
                              > "quilt" with icons for all the Feast Days to her son before she
                              reposes so
                              > that he would have a sample of her work as a remembrance (which I
                              told was
                              > quiet permissible) This is done is the tradition of older
                              Orthodoxy
                              > needlework in several countries throughout the world and is in no
                              way a
                              > "freak" thing and date far back in Orthodox culture. Lord have
                              mercy on you
                              > and your lack of understanding of our Faith. And your lack of
                              compassion
                              > and love as is seen in all your posts to whomever you dislike.

                              Don't let the leagalistic pharisees get you down. One thing I've
                              discovered is that our Church, our Faith, is much bigger and better
                              than they are (than I used to be). Remember what Fr. Anthony said to
                              you concerning them, how good and praiseworthy they are.

                              The Cross, BTW, was made by a lovely and Orthodox woman in California
                              who belongs to the Jerusalem Patriarchate and makes and sells many of
                              these Crosses as a ministry for the parish there. What is upon the
                              Cross are mounted from the little icon buttons which one may find in
                              canonical Orthodox bookstores.

                              In Christ Made Flesh,
                              Rd. DC

                              +------------------------------------------------------------+
                              | Reader David-Constantine Wright |
                              | http://constans_wright.tripod.com |
                              +------------------------------------------------------------+
                              | "God became Human so that human beings could become gods." |
                              | ---- St. Athanasius the Great, *On the Incarnation* |
                              +------------------------------------------------------------+
                            • David-Constantine Wright
                              ... the quilt . I ... No, you are right the first time: they are icons. Icons may be made of many different materials. Remember, Fr. Anthony blessed the
                              Message 14 of 14 , Jun 5, 2007
                              • 0 Attachment
                                --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, "Theodora" <theomtn@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Ah, what a world. In case someone else wants to shout about
                                the "quilt". I
                                > said "icons" for the Feast Days but they are really
                                > not.........forgive....but they are embr. designs for the Feast

                                No, you are right the first time: they are icons. Icons may be made of
                                many different materials. Remember, Fr. Anthony blessed the embroidered
                                icon of St. Juliana of Lazarevo with Holy Water and set it in the Altar
                                for 40 days... which is what the Church does for icons.

                                In Christ Made Flesh,
                                Rd. DC

                                +------------------------------------------------------------+
                                | Reader David-Constantine Wright |
                                | http://constans_wright.tripod.com |
                                +------------------------------------------------------------+
                                | "God became Human so that human beings could become gods." |
                                | ---- St. Athanasius the Great, *On the Incarnation* |
                                +------------------------------------------------------------+
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