Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Red Pascha Eggs: How to make . . .

Expand Messages
  • Stephen/Στέφανος
    Pics: http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/OrthodoxCuisine/photos/browse/2ff1 1. Purchase and use brown eggs. 2. Wash each egg by hand in a mild solution of
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 2, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Pics: http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/OrthodoxCuisine/photos/browse/2ff1

      1. Purchase and use brown eggs.

      2. Wash each egg by hand in a mild solution of water and regular dish soap.

      3. Dry thoroughly.

      4. Purchase Greek Red dye from a Greek Market/Bakery or on-line.
      (http://www.greekshops.com/detail.aspx?ProdID=REDD)
      (http://www.greekolivewarehouse.com/greggdyenore.html)

      5. Place eggs in a large pot (I use a Teflon pot, the dye comes out
      easily, with hot water and a little bleach) and cover with water, at least
      two inches above eggs.

      6. Disolve the package of dye in a cup of very hot water and add to
      eggs, and add 1 demi tasse (1/2 cup) of red vinegar to the water.
      Stir to mix, but not so vigorously that you crack the eggs.

      7. Boil the eggs about 10 minutes in the dye solution.

      8. Remove eggs and allow to dry. (You may even dip them a second
      time, for a darker color, after they have dried and cooled somewhat.

      9. When cool enough to handle and dry; and you are not going to dip them
      again; take a thick paper towel with a little olive oil on it and
      polish each egg.


      WHY ARE THE EGGS RED ??

      The egg is red, because traditionally in Orthodox Churches on the Eve
      of Pascha, at the Resurrection service, red eggs are distributed to the
      faithful at the end of the service, in memory of the holy tradition that
      St. Mary Magdalene had a basket of eggs while standing under the Cross
      of Christ, and some of His sacred blood dripped on them and turned them
      red. Sacred Tradition also tells us that St. Mary Magdalene went to
      Rome and presented the emperor with a red egg, proclaiming: Christ is
      Risen! Since then, even though other colors of eggs are used outside of
      church, red ones are always the symbol of Pascha and given to the
      faithful at the end of the Resurrection services.

      (Yes, eggs were used by many ancient societies as symbols of springtime
      new life and rebirth, the Holy Christian Church, as it did with many
      other pagan customs, took these customs and "baptizing" them, giving
      them a Christian context, symbolism and meaning. The Holy Church has
      "baptized" many ancient Jewish and pagan customs, hence making them
      Christian, for the edification and enlightenment of the Faithful.)


      Kaló Páscha! Happy Pascha!
    • Rebecca M
      ... outside of ... The variation on that story I heard as a child was that she went before the emperor offering a regular egg (that was the poor person s
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 3, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, Stephen/Στέφανος
        <sbuatl@...> wrote:
        >
        > Sacred Tradition also tells us that St. Mary Magdalene went to
        > Rome and presented the emperor with a red egg, proclaiming: Christ is
        > Risen! Since then, even though other colors of eggs are used
        outside of
        > church, red ones are always the symbol of Pascha and given to the
        > faithful at the end of the Resurrection services.


        The variation on that story I heard as a child was that she went
        before the emperor offering a regular egg (that was the poor person's
        tribute, others might bring a chicken or other offering) and
        saying "Christ is Risen!" To which he responded, "I can as much
        believe that as that the egg you hold would turn red." And it did.

        Rebecca
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.