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Cleveland Youth Retreat

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  • Fr. John R. Shaw
    With the Blessings of the First Hierarch of the Russian Church Abroad, Metropolitan Laurus, and Bishop Peter of Cleveland, a young adult retreat has been
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 3, 2006
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      With the Blessings of the First Hierarch of the Russian Church Abroad, Metropolitan
      Laurus, and Bishop Peter of Cleveland, a young adult retreat has been scheduled for
      November 24-26, 2006 at St. Sergius Cathedral in Cleveland (Parma), Ohio. The topic of
      the retreat is "St. John Chrysostom: Preparing for the 1600th anniversary of his repose".
      This retreat will focus on older youth (18 and older) and apply the teachings of St. John in
      the modern world. There will be lectures and discussions on topics such as family life, the
      priesthood, the Divine Liturgy, and heresies. An emphasis will be placed on the youth
      participating in the services by singing and partaking of Holy Communion. There will also
      be social events and other time for the young people to interact with one another.

      The retreat is being jointly organized by the youth of St. Sergius Cathedral of Cleveland
      (Parma), Ohio and St. Vladimir Church of Ann Arbor, Michigan.

      Please check this website often for updates and advance materials for the retreat.





      When: Friday, November 24, 2006 - Sunday, November 26, 2006

      Where: St. Sergius Russian Orthodox Cathedral, Cleveland (Parma), Ohio

      Who: Orthodox youth 18 years and older

      Cost: $50 per person. This includes lodging (quad occupancy), meals, and transporation.

      Deadline: November 14, 2006

      Hotel: Quality Inn (formerly Holiday Inn) of Richfield, OH (approx. 15 min from Cathedral)


      For registration information and forms click here>

      For a flyer to distribute click here>


      The schedule for the retreat is currently being planned and subject to change.

      Friday, November 24

      3-7 PM - Registration and check-in at hotel, getting to know everybody

      7-8 PM - Opening remarks and brief overview of the retreat

      8-10 PM - Dinner and social time in hotel's recreation area


      Saturday, November 25

      8-8:30 AM - Transport to St. Sergius Cathedral

      8:30-9 AM - Morning prayers

      9AM-12 - Breakfast, keynote address, small group discussions

      12-2 PM - Lunch and panel discussion

      2-4 PM - Informal discussions among youth and clergy, preperation for confession, and
      choir rehearsal.

      4-5 PM - Confessions and the Canon and prayers in preperation for Holy Communion

      5-6 PM - Light dinner

      6-8 PM - All-Night Vigil

      8-9 PM - Dessert and refreshments


      Sunday, November 26

      8:30 AM - Checkout and travel to Cathedral

      9:30 AM - Divine Liturgy followed by lunch and closing of the retreat.
    • Fr. John R. Shaw
      ... JRS: I would have hoped there would be a Divine Liturgy on that Saturday morning, rather than Morning Prayers . The Liturgy does not have to take more
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 4, 2006
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        --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, "Fr. John R. Shaw" <vrevjrs@...> wrote:

        > The schedule for the retreat is currently being planned and subject to change.
        > Saturday, November 25
        > 8-8:30 AM - Transport to St. Sergius Cathedral
        > 8:30-9 AM - Morning prayers...

        JRS: I would have hoped there would be a Divine Liturgy on that Saturday morning, rather
        than "Morning Prayers".

        The Liturgy does not have to take more than about an hour.

        In 1963, most of the Orthodox jurisdictions in the United States held their annual youth
        conventions together, in Pittsburgh. 10,000 people took part, and each day began with a
        Divine Liturgy.

        The daily Liturgies at the Nyack conference and the May Sobor in San Francisco this year
        were wonderful, and they alone were worth the trip.

        As for the "Morning Prayers", it should be pointed out that:

        1) They were never intended to be used as a public church service, but were designed for
        private use;

        2) The Slavonic "Morning Prayers" now used in the Russian Church were only introduced
        after Patriarch Nikon's reforms, and they do not exist in Greek.

        3) It appears that various prayers named for this or that great Saint (e.g. St. Macarius the
        Great) were later compositions, incorrectly ascribed to those Saints.

        At some point, these "morning prayers" began to be recited aloud in the seminary. But
        they were never meant to replace the authentic public services.

        In Christ
        Fr. John R. Shaw
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