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[orthodox-synod] Re: What were they thinking?!

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  • LJames6034@aol.com
    Bless your heart, Patrick, I left the Episcopal Church in no small part, because I came to realize that my earthy figure of speech When you poison the well,
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 7, 2000
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      Bless your heart, Patrick,

      I left the Episcopal Church in no small part, because I came to realize that
      my earthy figure of speech "When you poison the well, which part of it do you
      poison?" had to apply to the Episcopal Church, and to me and my family. We
      had gotten to the point that, unless I did the Liturgy, we did not go.

      The last time I was at an Episcopal church, it was for the obsequies for my
      late father-in-law. The liturgy was done by two Episcopal clergypersons.
      The priestess did the celebration. The rector (who looked amazingly like an
      Anglican clergyman out of the 1920s) did the commentary.

      I sat with my wife's brother-in-law, an Episcopal clergyman (now deceased).
      We enjoyed the whole experience. As his sons said, afterwards: "We knew it
      was a mistake for you and Dad to sit together. You two can't behave!"

      It was something curious to watch. It clergypersons were wearing vestments
      appropriate for the Roman Catholic High Mass. It was a spoken service. It
      seemed to me we were watching a holy dance. I've no doubt they did what they
      usually do.

      The rector invited everyone who could receive communion in his own church to
      receive. My wife's nephews and nieces who were Roman Catholic went forward
      and received. They were, of course, officially excommunicated from the
      Roman Church, but what do you want to bet they didn't mention that in
      confession, ever, afterward?

      Only the Orthodox portion of the family sat and watched.

      At the country club, later, my son Ian said one of his Roman Catholic
      cousins said to him: "I can't help but believe Grampa is in a better place."

      You'd have to realize Grampa had contributed his body to the medical school
      at the University of Miami (Florida).

      Ian said: "I thought: I know he is. Miami is always nicer this time of
      year."

      I, of course, have no idea where my children get that sort of thing!

      Yes, I do. It's in the genes.

      Father Andrew
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