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Re: [orthodox-synod] CHURCH RULES FOR CONFESSION & HOLY COMMUNION

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  • Paul Bartlett
    ... There seem to have been in the past, and to be at present, different attitudes and disciplines regarding Holy Communion. What has been posted here seems
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 1, 2006
      On Tue, 1 Aug 2006, Basil Yakimov wrote:

      > CHURCH RULES FOR CONFESSION & HOLY COMMUNION
      > by Protopriest Gregory Naumenko
      >
      > "If thou desirest, O man, to eat the Body of the Master, approach with fear
      > lest thou be burnt, for It is fire."
      >
      > "Behold, I approach the Divine Communion. O Creator, let me not be burnt by
      > communicating, for Thou art Fire consuming the unworthy." (From the Prayers
      > Before Holy Communion)
      >
      > Those who desire to have Confession and to commune of the Holy Mysteries
      > must prepare properly, according to the rules instituted by the Holy
      > Orthodox Church. Namely:
      > [trimmed for brevity]

      There seem to have been in the past, and to be at present, different
      attitudes and disciplines regarding Holy Communion. What has been posted
      here seems to be only one set of attitudes and discipline, perhaps as
      especially prevailing in the Russian Church.

      One attitude, which is reflected in an accompanying discipline, is
      (more or less) that Holy Communion is a sort of reward for the
      righteous, those who have put themselves through a rigorous
      "training," so to speak. This attitude and discipline seem to be
      associated with infrequent Communion among the laity.

      Another attitude, which is reflected in another discipline, is that
      Holy Communion is healing and nourishing food and medicine for the
      weak and sinful. The discipline of preparation is less strict, and
      the attitude and practice seem to be associated with more frequent
      Communion among the laity.

      Back when I was Orthodox in ROCOR, my association was to some extent
      with those in the following of Holy Transfiguration Monastery (who
      later became HOCNA). There the attitude was that Holy Communion was
      a normal part of participation in the Divine Liturgy unless there was
      some grave reason not to receive. This is not to say that there was
      no discipline of preparation, only that it was less strict, perhaps in
      part in recognition of human weakness.

      --
      Paul Bartlett
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