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DOUKABOR

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  • joasia94
    Can someone please explain, to me, who these people are? Apparently, they are situated in British Columbia. They ve been there for many generations. It s the
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 26 8:24 PM
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      Can someone please explain, to me, who these people are? Apparently,
      they are situated in British Columbia. They've been there for many
      generations.

      It's the first time that I've heard of these Russians.

      Joanna
    • antiquariu@aol.com
      In a message dated 7/27/2006 12:17:59 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, joasia9@hotmail.com writes: Can someone please explain, to me, who these people are?
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 27 2:56 AM
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        In a message dated 7/27/2006 12:17:59 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
        joasia9@... writes:

        Can someone please explain, to me, who these people are? Apparently,
        they are situated in British Columbia. They've been there for many
        generations.

        It's the first time that I've heard of these Russians.

        Joanna



        Hi Joanna! The Doukhobors are a fundamentalist sect that have been around
        since the 17th century and were banished by generations of tsars. Although
        the majority of them came from the Tambov and Ekaterinoslav [Dnepropetrovsk]
        guberniyas, they were in fact spread out over the entire empire, from Ukraine
        to Siberia, largely due to the official discriminatory policy and forced exile
        under the tsars. They became prominent during the 19th century, largely due
        to their 'back to the land' ethic and their total rejection of official
        Orthodoxy. This rejection was especially focussed against the Orthodox Church.
        Their theology is almost Primitive Baptist, with scripture being largely
        Psalmist, and a complete abhorence for all manner of clergy, the sacraments, and
        other external trappings of faith. Much like other 19th century sects,
        religious activity devolved into community meetings. The closest American sect for
        comparison purposes would be the Quakers.The name comes from Bishop Ambrosy
        of Ekaterinoslav, who in the 1780's coined it has an epithet ("spirit
        wrestlers") meaning that they wrestled against the Holy Spirit. They adopted it as
        an appelation over their original name as the "Christians of the Universal
        Brotherhood." After initial discriminatory flare-ups under Catherine and
        Alexander I, anti-Dukhobor activity reached a fever point under Nicholas II, who
        viewed their ban on military service and weapons as being treasonous.
        Thousands were exiled to Siberia and the Caucausus. Largely due to the personal and
        financial intervention of Lev Tolstoy, about 7500 families immigrated to
        Saskatchewan in the late 1890s. Tolstoy is still considered 'one of us' by the
        surviving members of the sect. Both in Russia and in Canada. they promoted a
        communist, absolutely democratic life-style which rejected all state
        authority. After Nicholas II started a major crackdown, the sect held a massive
        organized protest on St Peters Day in 1895, where all members of the sect laid
        down their weapons and torched them by Pslams, Gospels, and candlelight. At
        the direction of Nicholas II, there were massive state reprisals; the Black
        Hundreds rode into the Doukhobor villages and started rounding them up, in the
        process killing more than 1000 families out of the 9 or 10,000 which had
        existed. Because of intensity of the international protests at the severity of
        the reprisals by the Orthodox Church and Nicholas II, it was no longer
        possible for the autocracy to deal with these peasants they way they had with
        countless other Protestant sects - starving into submission and sending to
        Siberia. Tolstoy finished his book, Resurrection, and donated the proceeds to the
        sect, and together with Vladimir Chertkov, Prince Peter Kropotkin, Biryukov,
        and others, arranged for the mass immigration to Canada. Initially settling
        in Saskatchewan, they largely left there after the organization of that
        Province required a loyalty oath. And as is the fate of so many Protestant groups,
        it broke into three distinct trends, the largest of which was under the
        leadership of Peter "The Lordly" Verigin, who had rejoined the sect after
        completion of his Siberian exile in 1902. Verigin was assassinated a few years
        later. Today there are probably still about 45,000 Doukhobors in Canada, of
        which 15,000 practice. Though many assimilated, sojme were loud and in the mind
        of the Canadians, obnoxious. One of their particular styles of protest was
        practiced by the "Sons of Freedom" subsect, which believed in nude protest in
        public every time there was a problem with the central government. That did
        not go over very well with the Canadians.

        They do still exist. There are also active settlements in the Caucausus and
        in other parts of Russia. A wonderful museum exists in Verigin,
        Saskatchewan, as well as the Heritage village. Similar structures exist in and around
        Castlegar, British Columbia.

        These folks are interesting, Joanna, but they are not Orthodox. Their music
        is spectacular, and still actively performed.

        Hope it helped,

        Cheers,

        Vova H.




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      • frraphver
        ... Here s a link to a decent website with info on the Doukhobors. http://www.ualberta.ca/~jrak/doukhobors.htm When you read it you ll see they re basically a
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 27 5:43 AM
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          --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, "joasia94" <joasia9@...> wrote:
          >
          > Can someone please explain, to me, who these people are? Apparently,
          > they are situated in British Columbia. They've been there for many
          > generations.
          >
          > It's the first time that I've heard of these Russians.
          >
          > Joanna


          Here's a link to a decent website with info on the Doukhobors.
          http://www.ualberta.ca/~jrak/doukhobors.htm

          When you read it you'll see they're basically a Russian cult or sect
          dating from at least the 19th c. They believe in Christ but not at all
          in the way the Orthodox do. They're not related to the Old Believers,
          even the most radical as far as I know. They seem more like a mix of
          Anabaptist (they live communally and are radical pacifists) &
          Pentecostalism (Doukh refers to Holy Spirit).

          Back in the 50s and 60s in British Columbia in Canada where they had
          settles in colonies they made the news because one of the means they
          used to protest what they felt was government injustice towards them
          was to demonstrate naked in public.

          In the past few years there has been some further investigation by the
          Canadian media (I think there was something on The Fifth Estate) of
          what was behind this protest. It turns out the government removed
          quite a few of the children from their parents and legally seperated
          them. The children for the most part lost all memory of the fact that
          they had been Doukhobors. In many cases they hadn't seen their parents
          until years later as adults they grew curious about their childhood.
          This of course is seen by both parents and children as a great
          injustice of the government. The government of the time meanwhile
          believed the children were being hurt since the parents wouldn't allow
          them to attend public schools.

          From what I can remember the Doukhobors mostly kept to themselves
          except for their famous demonstrations. Mostly it was the 'life-style'
          of the Doukhobors which rubbed people the wrong way.

          In Christ- Fr Raphael Vereshack
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