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  • antiquariu@aol.com
    In a message dated 8/26/2005 2:00:28 AM Eastern Standard Time, sbuatl@comcast.net writes: Holy and Saint are synonymous in the English language, just as
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 26, 2005
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      In a message dated 8/26/2005 2:00:28 AM Eastern Standard Time,
      sbuatl@... writes:

      Holy and Saint are synonymous in the English language, just as Heilige
      and Sankt in German. Saint means holy. English is called a Germanic
      language, but in reality, due to the Norman Conquest, English is
      actually half Germanic and half Romance. There are many, many
      ideas/things in English that have duplicate/synonymous words: For
      example . . .

      Many words in English are duplicated, i.e. there are two words that
      basically mean the same thing. One word generally has a Germanic origin
      and the other a Latin origin (usually by way of Norman French). The
      Germanic word is usually considered the common, every-day word, and the
      word of Latin origin is considered a “fancy” or “big”word.

      Germanic Origin Latin Origin
      flood (der Flut) inundation
      skull cranium
      by hand (das Hand) manually (manus = hand)
      handbook manual
      finger digit
      asleep dormant
      writing script
      bedroom dormitory (original meaning)
      holy saint

      One should say: Holy Met. Philaret OR St. Met. Philaret........
      but never, Holy Saint Met. Philaret.

      Stephanos






      Dear Stephanos! Not so fast! Holy and Saint are NOT synonyms in English.
      Unlike "Saint," "Holy" is most frequently, but not exclusively, an adjective
      in English. The opposite is true in German, where it is mostly a noun. Your
      examples are off -- die Hand (note Gender) is always a noun, and does not
      mean "by hand." Your gender is also off on "die Flut."

      Only real bad translations from Greek and Russian confuse these two
      situations, resulting in frightfully stilted sounding English. For example, I've
      even seen the "Saint Napkin," which despite its obvious reference, is a real
      howler.

      To go int your last examples, keep in mind the use of an implied definite
      article (the) Holy Boniface, or Saint Boniface (no article).

      As another aside, "der/die Heilige" is the prefered usage in Protestant
      areas and a strong secondary in many Catholic areas. Sankt is usually found in
      the south(lots of Roman influence).

      In Christ,

      Vova Hindrichs


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