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Re: [rocorclergy-churchaffairs] Altar table & table of Oblation

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  • Fr. Basil Grisel
    Father John, Christ is in our midst ! I m looking for the type you see so commonly in Russia now. Post construction, square, with place for relics below.
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 27, 2005
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      Father John,

      Christ is in our midst !

      I'm looking for the type you see so commonly in Russia now. Post construction, square, with place for relics below. Similar for zhertvennik.

      Some time ago someone was circulating a plan with instructions. Excuse me, having trouble with my fingers today and typing the English language properly.

      I have a new member who wishes to do this as a podvig, and has the talent as well.

      Thank you ! Father Basil
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Fr. John R. Shaw<mailto:vrevjrs@...>
      To: rocorclergy@yahoogroups.com<mailto:rocorclergy@yahoogroups.com> ; orthodox-synod<mailto:orthodox-synod@egroups.com> ; rocorclergy<mailto:rocorclergy@yahoogroups.com> ; ustav<mailto:ustav@egroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2005 8:56 AM
      Subject: Re: [rocorclergy-churchaffairs] Altar table & table of Oblation



      Fr Basil Grisel wrote:

      > does someone have a download picture and directions on the construction of a proper
      altar table and table of oblation ?

      JRS: There are different styles.

      If you have noticed, in Greek and Serbian churches, and in a number of larger churches in
      Russia, the altar table is somewhat oblong (though not as much so as in Western churches).
      There is a tradition, which one can see especially in Russia, of building a canopy on 4 posts
      over the altar table.

      But in many Russian churches, especially abroad, the Holy Table came to be cubic in shape,
      or even higher than it is wide.

      The table of oblation, on the contrary, is more likely to be oblong in Russian emigre
      churches, and not infrequently. larger than the altar table.

      In Serbian and especially in Greek churches, the table of oblation may be smaller than the
      altar table. In Greek churches it may only be a small niche in the wall -- not even a table.

      In Christ
      Fr. John R. Shaw





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