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Protestant churches no longer dominate

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  • Hristofor
    *Mainline Protestant churches no longer dominate NCC Yearbook s list of top 25 U.S. religious bodies* http://www.ncccusa.org/news/050330yearbook.html [Non-text
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 4, 2005
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      *Mainline Protestant churches no longer dominate
      NCC Yearbook's list of top 25 U.S. religious bodies*


      http://www.ncccusa.org/news/050330yearbook.html


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Fr. John R. Shaw
      ... JRS: The key word here is mainline : the article goes on to say: The Catholic Church remains the largest faith group in the U.S. with 67,259,768 members
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 4, 2005
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        Regarding:

        > *Mainline Protestant churches no longer dominate
        > NCC Yearbook's list of top 25 U.S. religious bodies*

        JRS: The key word here is "mainline": the article goes on to say:

        "The Catholic Church remains the largest faith group in the U.S. with 67,259,768 members
        and a growth rate last year of 1.28 percent. The second largest denomination in the U.S. is
        still the Southern Baptist Convention with 16,439,603 members and a growth rate of 1.18
        percent. The United Methodist Church is third largest with a reported membership of
        8,251,175 and a growth rate of .002 percent. 

        "The Church of Jesus of Latter-day Saints, with a reported membership of 5,503,192, rose
        from the fifth to the fourth largest church in the U.S. The yearbook noted that the church
        “continues to grow remarkably” at a rate of 1.71 percent last year. 

        "A reported surge in membership of the Orthodox Church in America (OCA) has placed the
        communion on the list of the largest American churches. The Syosset, N.Y., based church
        grew 11.11 percent to 1-million members, according to the yearbook. 

        JRS: That, of course, is by the OCA's own reckoning.

        Most of such an increase would be due to arrivals of new emigres from Eastern Europe
        (mostly Romania) and the lands of the former Soviet Union, rather than to "church growth": it
        would mean that a certain number of Orthodox Christians have moved from one part of the
        world to another.

        "Other churches in the top 25 that continued to grow in 2004 are the Assemblies of God,
        2,729,562 members and a growth rate of 1.57 percent; the Episcopal Church, 2,320,221
        members and a growth rate of .57 percent; the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church,
        1,432,795 members and a growth rate of .14 percent; and Jehovah’s Witnesses, 1,041,030
        members and a growth rate of 1.82 percent. 
        >
        >
        > http://www.ncccusa.org/news/050330yearbook.html
      • Hristofor
        ... According to the same Greek commentator I heard talking about the paschalia, he mentioned there is a total of 7 million (combined jurisdictions) Orthodox
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 5, 2005
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          Fr. John R. Shaw ?????:

          >"A reported surge in membership of the Orthodox Church in America (OCA) has placed the
          >communion on the list of the largest American churches. The Syosset, N.Y., based church
          >grew 11.11 percent to 1-million members, according to the yearbook.
          >
          >JRS: That, of course, is by the OCA's own reckoning.
          >
          >Most of such an increase would be due to arrivals of new emigres from Eastern Europe
          >(mostly Romania) and the lands of the former Soviet Union, rather than to "church growth": it
          >would mean that a certain number of Orthodox Christians have moved from one part of the
          >world to another.
          >
          According to the same Greek commentator I heard talking about the
          paschalia, he mentioned there is a total of 7 million (combined
          jurisdictions) Orthodox in the US. I assume this does not include the
          Uniates, Copts and Armenians. If correct, that would place the Orthodox
          in fourth place, just behind the Methodists. If you were to include the
          COULD-HAVE-BEEN/SHOULD-HAVE-BEEN Orthodox: the unbaptized sons and
          daughters (and then their progeny) of all those who have fallen away
          from the Faith since the Orthodox began to immigrate to the US in the
          late XIX century, the number could have theoretically surpassed even the
          total number of Baptists in the US. What a staggering loss! Of course it
          pales in comparison to the millions of Orthodox souls who were never
          even born in Russia, thanks to Lenin, Stalin, Hitler, abortions, and to
          a lesser extent, FDR and Churchill.


          On a lighter note, finally a great headline!
          *
          Russia Church remains defiant*
          http://www.telegraphindia.com/1050405/asp/foreign/story_4575516.asp


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Fr. John R. Shaw
          ... JRS: When I was in college (1964-1968) the figures showed that all the Orthodox in the US put together, equalled the number of Episcopalians at that time.
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 5, 2005
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            Regarding:

            > According to the same Greek commentator I heard talking about the
            > paschalia, he mentioned there is a total of 7 million (combined
            > jurisdictions) Orthodox in the US. I assume this does not include the
            > Uniates, Copts and Armenians. If correct, that would place the Orthodox
            > in fourth place, just behind the Methodists. If you were to include the
            > COULD-HAVE-BEEN/SHOULD-HAVE-BEEN Orthodox: the unbaptized sons and
            > daughters (and then their progeny) of all those who have fallen away
            > from the Faith since the Orthodox began to immigrate to the US in the
            > late XIX century, the number could have theoretically surpassed even the
            > total number of Baptists in the US. What a staggering loss!

            JRS: When I was in college (1964-1968) the figures showed that all the Orthodox in the US
            put together, equalled the number of Episcopalians at that time.

            It was also estimated back then, that there were approximately 6 times as many people of
            Orthodox background or whose parents and grandparents had been Orthodox, OUTSIDE the
            Church, than in the Church.

            In a parish in New Jersey about that time, the children who were learning "Zakon Bozhy" or
            what we would now call "Sunday school", tried a project in which they looked up all the
            names in the phone book that were clearly Russian, Greek &c., omitting those of people they
            actually knew from the parish.

            Then, the children phoned those people and asked them what church they belonged to.

            None of them said they belonged to an Orthodox church,

            In Christ
            Fr. John R. Shaw
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