Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Middle way

Expand Messages
  • vkozyreff
    Dear List, There is no middle way between the Truth and the lie. (St. Mark of Ephesus) Simply let your `Yes be `Yes, and your `No, `No ; anything beyond
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 4, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear List,

      "There is no middle way between the Truth and the lie." (St. Mark of
      Ephesus)

      Simply let your `Yes' be `Yes,' and your `No,' `No'; anything beyond
      this comes from the evil one (Matthew 5:36-38).

      And yet, it seems that we are surrounded by a culture which
      constantly looks for the non-existent middle way :

      o If a bishop says something you do not like, just say: "It is
      his personal opinion".
      o If an anathema by the Church does not suit you, just say: "It
      was written originally in English" (which means that the alleged
      official author could not have authored it; moreover, the proposal
      was allegedly not voted as it should have been, etc).
      o If a sorrowful epistle does not suit you, just say: "It was
      not authored by Vl Philaret, but by Vl Gregory.
      o If Vl Alipy or Vl Vitaly says something you do not like,
      say: "They took advantage of his condition. He could not have said
      it, somebody has probably had him sign this text".
      o If a message from the MP does not suit you, say: "Pat. Alexi
      did not mean it. The text of the declaration was slipped by a priest
      who is against the union".

      In other words, without claiming that the declaration is untrue
      altogether, you just claim that it was in fact not authored by the
      supposed author. You get a situation where the author did and yet did
      not say the critical thing, and there you are with a middle between
      the truth and lie. And nobody noticed the trick. It works.

      It is like that horrible gesture which originated in the Anglo-Saxon
      world, with two fingers from each hand drawing a quotation mark in
      the air. It gives you a way of saying it without saying it and having
      mentioned it without taking the responsibility. It is like saying "He
      said it, but he did not mean it".

      I think that this expression ("he did not mean it") says a lot about
      the culture that produced it. No wonder that England is known
      as "Perfidious Albion". I am not sure that you can translate the
      expression right away into either French or Russian.

      But, is this Christian, or is it from the evil one?

      In God,

      Vladimir Kozyreff
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.