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Church Slavonic Fonts

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  • Fr. Alexander Lebedeff
    Frequently people ask where they can obtain Church Slavonic fonts. I, myself, yen years ago created a full Church Slavonic font by scanning the characters of
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 1, 2005
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      Frequently people ask where they can obtain Church Slavonic fonts. I,
      myself, yen years ago created a full Church Slavonic font by scanning the
      characters of the Slavonic Hierarchical Service Book, and then using
      Fontographer to edit the characters into the final form (a huge project, by
      the way--each character took several hours of editing--and there are
      several hundred characters in the Church Slavonic Font, when you consider
      all the possible variations).

      I would like to share with the members of these lists a magnificent
      resource for Church Slavonic fonts, found on the Russian language website
      Blagovest.

      http://blagovest.org.ru/modules/fonts/

      This site has 15 Church Slavonic Fonts (including True Type and Adobe Font
      Manager formats).

      Especially useful are the fonts named "Triodion," "Irmologion," and
      "Pochaevsk," in their ucf ttf form--meaning they are Unicode fonts.

      Also very useful is the Heading font "Psaltyr," which creates the very tall
      and narrow headings used in Service Books and on Icons.

      And what is great is the font "Indykton"--which contains the extremely
      ornate initial letters (the picture on the site does not do it justice--you
      have to download and install the font to really see it).

      What is nice is that all of the ucs fonts use the same character
      distribution, so that you can, after typesetting a text, just switch to
      another font to see if it looks better.

      Typesetting is still a chore. The basic letters are set up according to the
      standard Russian keyboard layout, while another set of letter variants is
      found under the English keyboard layout, which you can easily switch
      between. For example, the "ya" that looks like a "i-a" and which is used
      initially, is found on the Russian keyboard where the "ya" is (the "z"
      key"), while the other "ya"--the one that looks like an m with a hat--the
      one used in other positions is on the English keyboard at the same
      location. Intelligently, the "yat'" is found on the "e-oborotnoe" key.

      In order to know the location of the characters, I created a Word document
      with a table for both the Russian and English keyboards, lowercase and
      uppercase. Without that table, it's very difficult to remember where the
      characters are. Other characters are inserted using the Windows Character
      Map. (For some reason, the commonly-used "i" with a dot (actually two
      little slashes) is not found on the keyboards but only on the Character
      Map. I found it easiest to just copy and paste it onto my document, and
      then copy and paste it when needed.

      Very conveniently, the basic diacritical marks, such as breathing marks and
      accents, are placed where the numbers are on the keyboard. So--"1" is an
      acute accent, "2" is a grave accent, "3" is a breathing mark, "4" is a
      combination of a breathing mark and an acute accent, etc.

      And--all of these diacriticals are automatically set up to
      overstrike--meaning that you type an "a" and then a "2" and you get an "a"
      with a grave accent over it. Very simple. However, this does not work with
      some characters. For example, the "u" used in non-initial positions (the
      really tall one) cannot take the normal accents (they won't fit
      properly)--so that special characters exist for the "u" with these
      accents--same with the "yat'."

      Useful also may be the "Pseudoslavonic" fonts. These are fonts that have
      letters that look like Church Slavonic letters, but are really just Russian
      language fonts. They have the letter "e-oborotnoe" used in words like "eto,
      etot"--which, of course, does not exist in Church Slavonic--and a letter
      "ya" which looks like the Russian "ya" instead of either form of the
      Slavonic "ya."

      These fonts can be useful for headings in Church Bulletins and the like.

      Well, -- I just wanted to share this with you and hope you will find it of
      benefit.



      With love in Christ,

      Prot. Alexander Lebedeff


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • aprmih
      Father Bless, For what it s worth, at the bottom of the Irmologion website (http://irmologion.narod.ru/fonts.html), they have a template for MS Word97 and 2000
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 1, 2005
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        Father Bless,

        For what it's worth, at the bottom of the Irmologion website
        (http://irmologion.narod.ru/fonts.html), they have a template for MS
        Word97 and 2000 with macros built-in that will add all the accents
        and other little "extras" that go above the letters. It's truly a
        joy to work with. I don't know if it'll work with the newer versions
        though.

        On a related note, would you or anybody else on the list know where
        I could get a font with the latin characters that are in the
        slavonic "style"?

        Thanks
        Alex


        --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, "Fr. Alexander Lebedeff"
        <lebedeff@w...> wrote:
        > Frequently people ask where they can obtain Church Slavonic fonts.
        I,
        > myself, yen years ago created a full Church Slavonic font by
        scanning the
        > characters of the Slavonic Hierarchical Service Book, and then
        using
        > Fontographer to edit the characters into the final form (a huge
        project, by
        > the way--each character took several hours of editing--and there
        are
        > several hundred characters in the Church Slavonic Font, when you
        consider
        > all the possible variations).
        >
        > I would like to share with the members of these lists a
        magnificent
        > resource for Church Slavonic fonts, found on the Russian language
        website
        > Blagovest.
        >
        > http://blagovest.org.ru/modules/fonts/
        >
        > This site has 15 Church Slavonic Fonts (including True Type and
        Adobe Font
        > Manager formats).
        >
        > Especially useful are the fonts named "Triodion," "Irmologion,"
        and
        > "Pochaevsk," in their ucf ttf form--meaning they are Unicode fonts.
        >
        > Also very useful is the Heading font "Psaltyr," which creates the
        very tall
        > and narrow headings used in Service Books and on Icons.
        >
        > And what is great is the font "Indykton"--which contains the
        extremely
        > ornate initial letters (the picture on the site does not do it
        justice--you
        > have to download and install the font to really see it).
        >
        > What is nice is that all of the ucs fonts use the same character
        > distribution, so that you can, after typesetting a text, just
        switch to
        > another font to see if it looks better.
        >
        > Typesetting is still a chore. The basic letters are set up
        according to the
        > standard Russian keyboard layout, while another set of letter
        variants is
        > found under the English keyboard layout, which you can easily
        switch
        > between. For example, the "ya" that looks like a "i-a" and which
        is used
        > initially, is found on the Russian keyboard where the "ya" is
        (the "z"
        > key"), while the other "ya"--the one that looks like an m with a
        hat--the
        > one used in other positions is on the English keyboard at the same
        > location. Intelligently, the "yat'" is found on the "e-oborotnoe"
        key.
        >
        > In order to know the location of the characters, I created a Word
        document
        > with a table for both the Russian and English keyboards, lowercase
        and
        > uppercase. Without that table, it's very difficult to remember
        where the
        > characters are. Other characters are inserted using the Windows
        Character
        > Map. (For some reason, the commonly-used "i" with a dot (actually
        two
        > little slashes) is not found on the keyboards but only on the
        Character
        > Map. I found it easiest to just copy and paste it onto my
        document, and
        > then copy and paste it when needed.
        >
        > Very conveniently, the basic diacritical marks, such as breathing
        marks and
        > accents, are placed where the numbers are on the keyboard. So--"1"
        is an
        > acute accent, "2" is a grave accent, "3" is a breathing mark, "4"
        is a
        > combination of a breathing mark and an acute accent, etc.
        >
        > And--all of these diacriticals are automatically set up to
        > overstrike--meaning that you type an "a" and then a "2" and you
        get an "a"
        > with a grave accent over it. Very simple. However, this does not
        work with
        > some characters. For example, the "u" used in non-initial
        positions (the
        > really tall one) cannot take the normal accents (they won't fit
        > properly)--so that special characters exist for the "u" with these
        > accents--same with the "yat'."
        >
        > Useful also may be the "Pseudoslavonic" fonts. These are fonts
        that have
        > letters that look like Church Slavonic letters, but are really
        just Russian
        > language fonts. They have the letter "e-oborotnoe" used in words
        like "eto,
        > etot"--which, of course, does not exist in Church Slavonic--and a
        letter
        > "ya" which looks like the Russian "ya" instead of either form of
        the
        > Slavonic "ya."
        >
        > These fonts can be useful for headings in Church Bulletins and the
        like.
        >
        > Well, -- I just wanted to share this with you and hope you will
        find it of
        > benefit.
        >
        >
        >
        > With love in Christ,
        >
        > Prot. Alexander Lebedeff
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • CW
        Have you looked into the Serbo-Croatian fonts? They might be of help to you. Jéan-Claude Williams Annunciation Cathedral Columbus, Ohio ... From: aprmih To:
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 1, 2005
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          Have you looked into the Serbo-Croatian fonts? They might be of help to you.

          Jéan-Claude Williams
          Annunciation Cathedral
          Columbus, Ohio
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: aprmih
          To: orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2005 2:06 PM
          Subject: [orthodox-synod] Re: Church Slavonic Fonts


          On a related note, would you or anybody else on the list know where
          I could get a font with the latin characters that are in the
          slavonic "style"?

          Thanks
          Alex


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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