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9966Re: A change of topic, please!

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  • Archpriest Stefan Pavlenko
    Jan 4, 2004
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      I thought it (the film about "Rubliev") was a blasphemy, and an
      attempt to prove the triumph of "dvoe-veria" (mixture of pagan and
      Christian faith) over Orthodoxy in Russia!
      Archpriest Stefan Pavlenko

      PS: It is though, a historical FACT that it was a Russian who first
      flew in the air in a Lighter that air/hot air balloon!!!


      --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, "vkozyreff"
      <vladimir.kozyreff@s...> wrote:
      > Dear List,
      >
      > Speaking about Tarkovsky's Rubliov, I am not sure the film is really
      > orthodox. It is certainly not historical. If I remember, the script
      > goes that monk Andreï Roublev is chosen to paint frescos in a
      > cathedral, but he is disturbed by the subject: he cannot admit that
      > God takes revenge on his creatures at the dread Judgement. Moved by
      > the faith of original Christianity, he believes in a God of love and
      > of pardon, and this condemns him to loneliness and doubt.
      >
      > I do not think that Tarkovsky had a good knowledge of what monachism
      > and orthodoxy are about. Who told him that the Church did teach the
      > vision against which his Rubliov struggled? Who told him that
      > believing in a God of love threw him, an orthodox monk, into
      > loneliness? The MP?
      >
      > In fact, this film was not totally disagreeable to the regime, as it
      > gave a negative idea of the Church and presented Rubliev as a kind of
      > protestant in rebellion against the Church and composing his personal
      > orthodoxy. Considering that Rubliov painted among the most beautiful
      > and most orthodox icons and frescoes, the film, whatever the talent
      > of the author is almost a sacrilege. Please, Messrs. the non-orthodox
      > film directors, keep your hands off orthodoxy before you convert.
      >
      > As you know, the regime was an expert in managing "dissidence" to its
      > benefit (Vysotsky, Akhudjava, etc.)
      >
      > I confess that I saw the film a very long time ago, but the scent of
      > it was very little orthodox and very much soviet in my memory.
      >
      > In God,
      >
      > Vladimir Kozyreff
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In orthodox-synod@yahoogroups.com, Gerald Herrin
      > <geraldherrin@e...> wrote:
      > > I am pleased to answer this, or at least give my opinion:
      > >
      > > 1) The Northern Thebaid: Monastic Saints of the Russian North
      > > 2) Early Fathers from the Philokalia, translated by E. Kadloubovsky
      > and
      > > G.E,H. Palmer
      > > 3) Any of the biographies of the Optina Elders
      > > 4) Dostoevsky.... Crime and Punishment, The Demons, and the
      > Brothers
      > > Karamazov
      > > 5) Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (not Orthodox, of
      > > course, but still one of the finest histories of the later Roman
      > Empire
      > > in English)
      > > 6) Saint Augustine's Confessions
      > > 7) and could I watch Andrei Tarkovsky's Andrei Rublev and Fellini's
      > La
      > > Strada on this desert island?
      > >
      > > My suggestions for myself ....
      > >
      > > Isaac (Gerald) Herrin
      > >
      > >
      > > On Tuesday, December 30, 2003, at 09:45 AM, Olga wrote:
      > >
      > > > Therefore, I propose a change of topic:
      > > > If you were stuck on a desert island, besides the Gospel, of
      > course,
      > > > which Orthodox books would you want to have with you? The ones
      > that
      > > > you find particularly close to your heart, the most inspiring, the
      > > > most enlightening, the most moving!
      > >
      > >
      > > Gerald Herrin
      > > geraldherrin@e...
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