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RE: [orthodox-rocor] Russia also listens to us --- but are we using the correct endings when they do?

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  • Meg Lark
    Glory to God for all things! Fr. Deacon Anthony wrote: But for me, it is also the structure that I need, along with the pressure of not wanting to appear dumb
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 31, 2006

      Glory to God for all things!  Fr. Deacon Anthony wrote:

       

      But for me, it is also the structure that I need, along with the
      pressure of not wanting to appear dumb in front of other people. I am
      sinfully arrogant about my intelligence (which is why I am so deeply
      embarassed to speak Russian worse than any Russian 2-year-old). Recently, by
      God's holy mercy I found out that I am not nearly as smart as I always
      thought I was. I managed to fool others, and even myself, by obsessive
      concentration on the effort to do so. Now, on my better days I am happy to
      be dumb, though I still cannot rest in simplicity or stillness. But I am
      afraid to ask the Lord to help me in this!

      [ml] Yes, when we ask for help with our less obvious character flaws, He is only too happy to come to our aid.        ;-)

      For what it’s worth, I find that Russians who can speak perfectly good English are also horribly embarrassed to have to do so, because they speak with an accent, and they think this makes them look “stupid.”

      A friend of mine is choir director at a “local” (40 miles away) parish, and recently a lady there offered to help him with his rusty Russian.  Her version of “help” is total immersion!  But he says he is rapidly remembering things he thought he had long ago forgotten, so obviously there’s something to it.

      I do appreciate my University courses, though – I may not know much vocabulary, but at least I’m secure about the grammar.

      In Christ,

      Meg

    • DDD
      Dear Fr. Anthony (and, of course, everyone else who wants to read this), I sincerely hope I did not offend you in any way--I forget now even what it was I was
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 31, 2006
        Dear Fr. Anthony (and, of course, everyone else who wants to read this),

        I sincerely hope I did not offend you in any way--I forget now even what it was I was chuckling over, but it was in a good way.
        [Inserted sentence here: I just saw the newly-added second half of the subject line "but are we using the correct endings when they do?] and I am woo-hoo, chuckling all over again!]
        However, I can really relate about the sarcasm--I, too, in my younger years considered it a kind of game, a kind of refined fencing.... I prided myself on being able to get a sharp (and probably funny, to me) last word in. This became especially so at my job at the old Wang [computer] Labs in Lowell. One of the gals there was perhaps even sharper than I, but definitely into sarcasm. The rage in those days was "turkey jokes"--remember them? So, for her birthday I thought I would get her a nice book of them, and sincerely thought she would appreciate them.
        There came my first enlightenment as to the evils of sarcasm.... Not only did she not appreciate the book that I had spent my hard-earned money on, but she was ***deeply offended****. Evidently she thought I was making a glancing reference to her being a "turkey." Needless to say, I was very upset, and from then on I quite lost my taste for sarcasm. I even don't like it when kids will say, "Only kidding!" after a hurtful or unflattering comment. Well, glory to God, how He instructs us. Reading the Epistle today, I can't help but agree that my mouth gets me into trouble. I have in my Drafts e-mail folder about 3 or 4 messages for every one I actually send. I always wonder whether, when writing a message, there will be something in it that would offend, so I put it away for awhile, and often forget or lack time to go review it again and send it. There's a lot of good information in my Drafts folder! :)

        I can also really relate to not wanting to appear dumb in front of other people. As far as learning goes, I think that is a good thing. But if it will make you feel any better, I know a wonderful Russian lady, very intelligent, who by and large refuses to speak any English--precisely because she is so well-educated that if she cannot say what she wishes, perfectly, then she doesn't want to say it at all. Someone has told me that most Russians, in general, are like that. I relate completely to that. I also suspect it may be why some little children do not "learn" to talk until well after all the others, but when they do, they come out with whole paragraphs!

        I'll end with the old joke:
        Q: What do you call someone who speaks two languages:
        A: Bilingual
        Q: What do you call a person who speaks three languages?
        A: Trilingual.
        Q: What do you call a person who speaks one language?

        (scroll down, drum roll)

































        A: An American! :)

        --Dimitra


        Fr Anthony Bridges wrote:
         Da, konesh. But for me, it is also the structure that I need, along
         with the pressure of not wanting to appear dumb in front of other
         people. I am sinfully arrogant about my intelligence (which is why I
         am so deeply embarassed to speak Russian worse than any Russian 2-
         year-old). Recently, by God's holy mercy I found out that I am not
         nearly as smart as I always thought I was. I managed to fool others,
         and even myself, by obsessive concentration on the effort to do so.
         Now, on my better days I am happy to be dumb, though I still cannot
         rest in simplicity or stillness. But I am afraid to ask the Lord to
         help me in this!

         In Christ,

         Deacon Anthony
         Jasper, GA
      • Fr Anthony Bridges
        meg, no offense at all...more later.. deacon a ... From: Meg Lark To: orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, January 31, 2006 2:32 PM Subject: RE:
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 1, 2006
          meg,
           
          no offense at all...more later..
           
          deacon a
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Meg Lark
          Sent: Tuesday, January 31, 2006 2:32 PM
          Subject: RE: [orthodox-rocor] Russia also listens to us --- but are we using the correct endings when they do?

          Glory to God for all things!  Fr. Deacon Anthony wrote:

           

          But for me, it is also the structure that I need, along with the
          pressure of not wanting to appear dumb in front of other people. I am
          sinfully arrogant about my intelligence (which is why I am so deeply
          embarassed to speak Russian worse than any Russian 2-year-old). Recently, by
          God's holy mercy I found out that I am not nearly as smart as I always
          thought I was. I managed to fool others, and even myself, by obsessive
          concentration on the effort to do so. Now, on my better days I am happy to
          be dumb, though I still cannot rest in simplicity or stillness. But I am
          afraid to ask the Lord to help me in this!

          [ml] Yes, when we ask for help with our less obvious character flaws, He is only too happy to come to our aid.        ;-)

          For what it’s worth, I find that Russians who can speak perfectly good English are also horribly embarrassed to have to do so, because they speak with an accent, and they think this makes them look “stupid.”

          A friend of mine is choir director at a “local” (40 miles away) parish, and recently a lady there offered to help him with his rusty Russian.  Her version of “help” is total immersion!  But he says he is rapidly remembering things he thought he had long ago forgotten, so obviously there’s something to it.

          I do appreciate my University courses, though – I may not know much vocabulary, but at least I’m secure about the grammar.

          In Christ,

          Meg

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