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Re: [orthodox-rocor] The fast isn't hard. Sin is hard...

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  • Shashkin | Шашкин
    I would be interested in hearing responses, as I have late, late adult onset Type1. Hristofor
    Message 1 of 15 , Feb 27, 2012
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      I would be interested in hearing responses, as I have late, late adult onset Type1.

      Hristofor


      On 27 Feb 2012, at 02.21, Vasily Georgevich Green wrote:

       

      I have a question regarding this.

      I have type 2 diabetes.  Fasting IS hard because I cannot eat potatoes, or bread, which is a lot of what is usual fasting fare, doubly hard is living in a remote area where vegetables are scarce in winter.

      I really want to fast every day this year but I am not sure what do do when the doctors say not to eat the foods most people eat during Velikiy Post

      George Green

      On 02/26/2012 11:54 PM, Seraphim Holland wrote:

       
      "The fast isn't hard. Sin is hard. Disease is hard. Being broken is hard. All those things are hard. Fasting is what helps us to be healed. How could it be hard? You see, the things that you are make fasting seem hard to you because fasting is helping you to be healed of those things. And yet we think fasting is hard. Don't think that."
      From a soon to be published sermon in print. Available in audio:
      http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-05_2009-03-01+sunday-of-forgiveness.mp3

      --
      Priest Seraphim Holland
      seraphim@...  Cell:972 658-5433 Home:972 529-2754
      ST NICHOLAS ORTHODOX CHURCH  => http://www.orthodox.net
      *** 708 S Chestnut, MCKINNEY, TEXAS 75070 *** 
      EMAIL:http://groups.google.com/group/saint-nicholas-orthodox-church
      BLOG:http://www.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime




    • ambrois@xtra.co.nz
      There are two approaches to this question and each is exemplified by two bishops in our diocese. 1. When one granny asked a bishop if she, with diabetes,
      Message 2 of 15 , Feb 27, 2012
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        There are two approaches to this question and
        each is exemplified by two bishops in our diocese.
         
        1.  When one granny asked a bishop if she, with diabetes, could have a small bite to eat and take her pills on a Sunday morning before Communion he advised her not to do so but to entrust her health and well-being to God.
         
        2. Another bishop replied to an identical question with the opposite advice – to take her pills and to eat a minimal amount of food to avoid the risk of hypoglycemia.  And not to refrain from Communion.
         
        Conclusion – do what you believe is right for you and your situation.  You may decide not to take your pills and not to eat anything.  You may decide otherwise.
         
        I am interested in other responses.
         
        Hierom.Ambrose
         
        --------------------------------------------
         
         
         
        Sent: Tuesday, February 28, 2012 1:22 AM
        Subject: Re: [orthodox-rocor] The fast isn't hard. Sin is hard...
         
         

        I would be interested in hearing responses, as I have late, late adult onset Type1.

         
        Hristofor
         
         
        On 27 Feb 2012, at 02.21, Vasily Georgevich Green wrote:

         

        I have a question regarding this.

        I have type 2 diabetes.  Fasting IS hard because I cannot eat potatoes, or bread, which is a lot of what is usual fasting fare, doubly hard is living in a remote area where vegetables are scarce in winter.

        I really want to fast every day this year but I am not sure what do do when the doctors say not to eat the foods most people eat during Velikiy Post

        George Green

        On 02/26/2012 11:54 PM, Seraphim Holland wrote:

         
        "The fast isn't hard. Sin is hard. Disease is hard. Being broken is hard. All those things are hard. Fasting is what helps us to be healed. How could it be hard? You see, the things that you are make fasting seem hard to you because fasting is helping you to be healed of those things. And yet we think fasting is hard. Don't think that."
        From a soon to be published sermon in print. Available in audio:
        http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-05_2009-03-01+sunday-of-forgiveness.mp3

        --
        Priest Seraphim Holland
        seraphim@...  Cell:972 658-5433 Home:972 529-2754
        ST NICHOLAS ORTHODOX CHURCH  => http://www.orthodox.net
        *** 708 S Chestnut, MCKINNEY, TEXAS 75070 *** 
        EMAIL:http://groups.google.com/group/saint-nicholas-orthodox-church
        BLOG:http://www.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime


         
         
    • Leonid Mickle
      Might I humbly suggest that you look through what St. John Chrysostom had to say on the subject of fasting. Some of that mateial is available e.g. at
      Message 3 of 15 , Feb 27, 2012
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        Might I humbly suggest that you look through what St. John Chrysostom had to say on the subject of fasting.  Some of that mateial is
        available e.g. at http://www.orthodoxytoday.org/articles4/ChrysostomFasting.php.  You might also reflect on the reading at the Liturgy for Cheesefare Sunday (Romans 13:12-14:4).   Fasting is a tool, something intended to keep us on track.  Modification of any of the external expressions of that tool should be undertaken after consulting with your priest/confessor.

        Please forgive me a sinner.

        d. Leonid Mickle   

        On 2/27/12 2:21 AM, Vasily Georgevich Green wrote:
         

        I have a question regarding this.

        I have type 2 diabetes.  Fasting IS hard because I cannot eat potatoes, or bread, which is a lot of what is usual fasting fare, doubly hard is living in a remote area where vegetables are scarce in winter.

        I really want to fast every day this year but I am not sure what do do when the doctors say not to eat the foods most people eat during Velikiy Post

        George Green

        On 02/26/2012 11:54 PM, Seraphim Holland wrote:

         
        "The fast isn't hard. Sin is hard. Disease is hard. Being broken is hard. All those things are hard. Fasting is what helps us to be healed. How could it be hard? You see, the things that you are make fasting seem hard to you because fasting is helping you to be healed of those things. And yet we think fasting is hard. Don't think that."
        From a soon to be published sermon in print. Available in audio:
        http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-05_2009-03-01+sunday-of-forgiveness.mp3

        --
        Priest Seraphim Holland
        seraphim@...  Cell:972 658-5433 Home:972 529-2754
        ST NICHOLAS ORTHODOX CHURCH  => http://www.orthodox.net
        *** 708 S Chestnut, MCKINNEY, TEXAS 75070 *** 
        EMAIL:http://groups.google.com/group/saint-nicholas-orthodox-church
        BLOG:http://www.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime



      • Seraphim Holland
        I do not think you have a conundrum. Make no provision for the flesh. The flesh is not your stomach and pancreas, and the rest of your body - it is your
        Message 4 of 15 , Feb 27, 2012
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          I do not think you have a conundrum. Make no provision for the flesh. The "flesh" is not your stomach and pancreas, and the rest of your body - it is your desires, habits, priorities, passions - anything that is contrary to the will of God.

          Do not eat for pleasure - eat as if the food is medicine. Do you like scrambled eggs? Eat them hardboiled, without salt. Do you like tuna salad? Eat tuna out of the can without condiments. Do you love Montery Jack cheese? Eat American cheese - and not on a sandwich.

          In this way, you keep the spirit of the fast - as long as you are also struggling to pray, and fast from sins.

          I remember when a woman with stomach problems told me she needed yogurt during the fast. I said that was fine, if she treated it like medicine. I then asked if she loved yogurt with jelly or preserves at the bottom. She smiled and enthusiastically said "Yes!". I told her to eat plain yogurt.

          The flesh is wily and insatiable. Learn to recognize its whining, and leave it outside, like a spoiled barking dog.

          On Mon, Feb 27, 2012 at 1:21 AM, Vasily Georgevich Green <aleksandrgeorgevich@...> wrote:
          I have a question regarding this.

          I have type 2 diabetes.  Fasting IS hard because I cannot eat potatoes, or bread, which is a lot of what is usual fasting fare, doubly hard is living in a remote area where vegetables are scarce in winter.

          I really want to fast every day this year but I am not sure what do do when the doctors say not to eat the foods most people eat during Velikiy Post

          George Green

          On 02/26/2012 11:54 PM, Seraphim Holland wrote:
           
          "The fast isn't hard. Sin is hard. Disease is hard. Being broken is hard. All those things are hard. Fasting is what helps us to be healed. How could it be hard? You see, the things that you are make fasting seem hard to you because fasting is helping you to be healed of those things. And yet we think fasting is hard. Don't think that."
          From a soon to be published sermon in print. Available in audio:
          http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-05_2009-03-01+sunday-of-forgiveness.mp3

          --
          Priest Seraphim Holland
          seraphim@...  Cell:972 658-5433 Home:972 529-2754
          ST NICHOLAS ORTHODOX CHURCH  => http://www.orthodox.net
          *** 708 S Chestnut, MCKINNEY, TEXAS 75070 *** 
          EMAIL:http://groups.google.com/group/saint-nicholas-orthodox-church
          BLOG:http://www.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime





          --
          Priest Seraphim Holland
          seraphim@...  Cell:972 658-5433 Home:972 529-2754
          ST NICHOLAS ORTHODOX CHURCH  => http://www.orthodox.net
          *** 708 S Chestnut, MCKINNEY, TEXAS 75070 *** 
          EMAIL:http://groups.google.com/group/saint-nicholas-orthodox-church
          BLOG:http://www.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime

        • Alex Krassovsky
          Diabetes is a lifelong fast. Those of us without it, are free to choose how we fast and - rightfully or wrongfully per our choice - when to fast.  When Great
          Message 5 of 15 , Feb 27, 2012
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            Diabetes is a lifelong fast. Those of us without it, are free to choose how we fast and - rightfully or wrongfully per our choice - when to fast.  When Great lent is over, we are free to celebrate with whatever foods we wish, while the diabetic still remains a diabetic.  Diabetes is a life-long and life-changing podvig - as every fast should be.  Allow me to quote the words of St. Seraphim of Sarov who said, that it is not so much what we eat, but how much.  What have we gained if we stuff ourselves with lenten food?  My suggestion to you, and to all my parishioners in similar situations, is to set as close a goal as you physically can when it comes to food during the fast and make up the difference in spiritual fasting - reading of canons, akathists and other prayers and of course, the regular attendance at chuch, confessions and communion.  God give you strength!

            prot. Alexander Krassovsky
            Sts. Peter & Paul ROC
            Santa Rosa, CA

            --- On Mon, 2/27/12, Shashkin | Шашкин <hristofor@...> wrote:

            From: Shashkin | Шашкин <hristofor@...>
            Subject: Re: [orthodox-rocor] The fast isn't hard. Sin is hard...
            To: orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, February 27, 2012, 4:22 AM



            I would be interested in hearing responses, as I have late, late adult onset Type1.

            Hristofor


            On 27 Feb 2012, at 02.21, Vasily Georgevich Green wrote:

             

            I have a question regarding this.

            I have type 2 diabetes.  Fasting IS hard because I cannot eat potatoes, or bread, which is a lot of what is usual fasting fare, doubly hard is living in a remote area where vegetables are scarce in winter.

            I really want to fast every day this year but I am not sure what do do when the doctors say not to eat the foods most people eat during Velikiy Post

            George Green

            On 02/26/2012 11:54 PM, Seraphim Holland wrote:

             
            "The fast isn't hard. Sin is hard. Disease is hard. Being broken is hard. All those things are hard. Fasting is what helps us to be healed. How could it be hard? You see, the things that you are make fasting seem hard to you because fasting is helping you to be healed of those things. And yet we think fasting is hard. Don't think that."
            From a soon to be published sermon in print. Available in audio:
            http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-05_2009-03-01+sunday-of-forgiveness.mp3

            --
            Priest Seraphim Holland
            seraphim@...  Cell:972 658-5433 Home:972 529-2754
            ST NICHOLAS ORTHODOX CHURCH  => http://www.orthodox.net
            *** 708 S Chestnut, MCKINNEY, TEXAS 75070 *** 
            EMAIL:http://groups.google.com/group/saint-nicholas-orthodox-church
            BLOG:http://www.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime






          • Meg Lark
            I have always been told that if you have a medical condition such as this, you NEED to talk to your priest. The Fast is a discipline (which most of us could
            Message 6 of 15 , Feb 27, 2012
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              I have always been told that if you have a medical condition such as this, you NEED to talk to your priest.  The Fast is a discipline (which most of us could use, frankly), not a hard and fast rule that threatens your life.
               
              Several years ago, I had major surgery just prior to the Dormition Fast, which, while short, is also strict.  I was *forbidden* to fast because of my medical condition.  Likewise, my son, who is a freight conductor for a large railroad, was told not to fast because of the hard physical labor involved in his job.
               
              Diabetes is nothing to mess around with, and this is about as clear a case as I can think of to get input from your priest.
               
              In Christ,
              Meg Lark


              On Mon, Feb 27, 2012 at 2:21 AM, Vasily Georgevich Green <aleksandrgeorgevich@...> wrote:
               

              I have a question regarding this.

              I have type 2 diabetes.  Fasting IS hard because I cannot eat potatoes, or bread, which is a lot of what is usual fasting fare, doubly hard is living in a remote area where vegetables are scarce in winter.

              I really want to fast every day this year but I am not sure what do do when the doctors say not to eat the foods most people eat during Velikiy Post

              George Green

            • Shashkin | Шашкин
              That reminds me of a similar difference in opinion. After college I went to Helsinki to study for 1 semester in 1987. I asked my spiritual father if I should
              Message 7 of 15 , Feb 27, 2012
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                That reminds me of a similar difference in opinion. After college I went to Helsinki to study for 1 semester in 1987. I asked my spiritual father if I should go to Communion in the MP or the Finnish Church. He replied that under no circumstances should I go to the Finnish Church but to the MP. He also said to ask my local bishop. The bishop, of course, said under no circumstances should I go to the MP but to the Finnish Church.

                Not a fasting anecdote, but just show the great flexibility of the HOC.

                Hristofor

                On 27 Feb 2012, at 07.44, ambrois@... wrote:

                 

                There are two approaches to this question and
                each is exemplified by two bishops in our diocese.
                 
                1.  When one granny asked a bishop if she, with diabetes, could have a small bite to eat and take her pills on a Sunday morning before Communion he advised her not to do so but to entrust her health and well-being to God.
                 
                2. Another bishop replied to an identical question with the opposite advice – to take her pills and to eat a minimal amount of food to avoid the risk of hypoglycemia.  And not to refrain from Communion.
                 
                Conclusion – do what you believe is right for you and your situation.  You may decide not to take your pills and not to eat anything.  You may decide otherwise.
                 
                I am interested in other responses.
                 
                Hierom.Ambrose
                 
                --------------------------------------------
                 
                 
                 
                Sent: Tuesday, February 28, 2012 1:22 AM
                Subject: Re: [orthodox-rocor] The fast isn't hard. Sin is hard...
                 
                 

                I would be interested in hearing responses, as I have late, late adult onset Type1.

                 
                Hristofor
                 
                 
                On 27 Feb 2012, at 02.21, Vasily Georgevich Green wrote:

                 

                I have a question regarding this.

                I have type 2 diabetes.  Fasting IS hard because I cannot eat potatoes, or bread, which is a lot of what is usual fasting fare, doubly hard is living in a remote area where vegetables are scarce in winter.

                I really want to fast every day this year but I am not sure what do do when the doctors say not to eat the foods most people eat during Velikiy Post

                George Green

                On 02/26/2012 11:54 PM, Seraphim Holland wrote:

                 
                "The fast isn't hard. Sin is hard. Disease is hard. Being broken is hard. All those things are hard. Fasting is what helps us to be healed. How could it be hard? You see, the things that you are make fasting seem hard to you because fasting is helping you to be healed of those things. And yet we think fasting is hard. Don't think that."
                From a soon to be published sermon in print. Available in audio:
                http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-05_2009-03-01+sunday-of-forgiveness.mp3

                --
                Priest Seraphim Holland
                seraphim@...  Cell:972 658-5433 Home:972 529-2754
                ST NICHOLAS ORTHODOX CHURCH  => http://www.orthodox.net
                *** 708 S Chestnut, MCKINNEY, TEXAS 75070 *** 
                EMAIL:http://groups.google.com/group/saint-nicholas-orthodox-church
                BLOG:http://www.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime


                 
                 


              • Vasily Georgevich Green
                if i eat potatoes and pasta all month i will have serious physical problems; likely eating only a handful a day I will gain around 40 pounds in a month, and
                Message 8 of 15 , Feb 27, 2012
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                  if i eat potatoes and pasta all month i will have serious physical problems; likely eating only a handful a day I will gain around 40 pounds in a month, and have kidney problems, not be able to feel my toes or fingers, and in general it's not healthy

                  diabetes exists; it's real!

                  George Green

                  On 02/27/2012 04:52 PM, Seraphim Holland wrote: I do not think you have a conundrum. Make no provision for the flesh. The "flesh" is not your stomach and pancreas, and the rest of your body - it is your desires, habits, priorities, passions - anything that is contrary to the will of God.

                  Do not eat for pleasure - eat as if the food is medicine. Do you like scrambled eggs? Eat them hardboiled, without salt. Do you like tuna salad? Eat tuna out of the can without condiments. Do you love Montery Jack cheese? Eat American cheese - and not on a sandwich.

                  In this way, you keep the spirit of the fast - as long as you are also struggling to pray, and fast from sins.

                  I remember when a woman with stomach problems told me she needed yogurt during the fast. I said that was fine, if she treated it like medicine. I then asked if she loved yogurt with jelly or preserves at the bottom. She smiled and enthusiastically said "Yes!". I told her to eat plain yogurt.

                  The flesh is wily and insatiable. Learn to recognize its whining, and leave it outside, like a spoiled barking dog.

                  On Mon, Feb 27, 2012 at 1:21 AM, Vasily Georgevich Green <aleksandrgeorgevich@...> wrote:
                  I have a question regarding this.

                  I have type 2 diabetes.  Fasting IS hard because I cannot eat potatoes, or bread, which is a lot of what is usual fasting fare, doubly hard is living in a remote area where vegetables are scarce in winter.

                  I really want to fast every day this year but I am not sure what do do when the doctors say not to eat the foods most people eat during Velikiy Post

                  George Green

                  On 02/26/2012 11:54 PM, Seraphim Holland wrote:
                   
                  "The fast isn't hard. Sin is hard. Disease is hard. Being broken is hard. All those things are hard. Fasting is what helps us to be healed. How could it be hard? You see, the things that you are make fasting seem hard to you because fasting is helping you to be healed of those things. And yet we think fasting is hard. Don't think that."
                  From a soon to be published sermon in print. Available in audio:
                  http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-05_2009-03-01+sunday-of-forgiveness.mp3

                  --
                  Priest Seraphim Holland
                  seraphim@...  Cell:972 658-5433 Home:972 529-2754
                  ST NICHOLAS ORTHODOX CHURCH  => http://www.orthodox.net
                  *** 708 S Chestnut, MCKINNEY, TEXAS 75070 *** 
                  EMAIL:http://groups.google.com/group/saint-nicholas-orthodox-church
                  BLOG:http://www.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime





                  --
                  Priest Seraphim Holland
                  seraphim@...  Cell:972 658-5433 Home:972 529-2754
                  ST NICHOLAS ORTHODOX CHURCH  => http://www.orthodox.net
                  *** 708 S Chestnut, MCKINNEY, TEXAS 75070 *** 
                  EMAIL:http://groups.google.com/group/saint-nicholas-orthodox-church
                  BLOG:http://www.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime


                • frjohnwhiteford
                  I would suggest learning how to cook Chinese food, and going that route. Chinese food doesn t usually have potatoes, and there s not all that much along the
                  Message 9 of 15 , Feb 28, 2012
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                    I would suggest learning how to cook Chinese food, and going that route. Chinese food doesn't usually have potatoes, and there's not all that much along the lines of pasta (though they have some noodle dishes). Eat lots of stir-fried vegetables, tofu (the Chinese varieties, not the cottage cheese style you get in most grocery stores), and soups.

                    Also, most Chinese dishes that have meat in them can be cooked without meat, and still taste good.

                    -Fr. John Whiteford


                    --- In orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com, Vasily Georgevich Green <aleksandrgeorgevich@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > if i eat potatoes and pasta all month i will have serious physical
                    > problems; likely eating only a handful a day I will gain around 40
                    > pounds in a month, and have kidney problems, not be able to feel my toes
                    > or fingers, and in general it's not healthy
                    >
                    > diabetes exists; it's real!
                    >
                    > George Green
                    >
                    > On 02/27/2012 04:52 PM, Seraphim Holland wrote:
                    > > I do not think you have a conundrum. Make no provision for the flesh.
                    > > The "flesh" is not your stomach and pancreas, and the rest of your
                    > > body - it is your desires, habits, priorities, passions - anything
                    > > that is contrary to the will of God.
                    > >
                    > > Do not eat for pleasure - eat as if the food is medicine. Do you like
                    > > scrambled eggs? Eat them hardboiled, without salt. Do you like tuna
                    > > salad? Eat tuna out of the can without condiments. Do you love Montery
                    > > Jack cheese? Eat American cheese - and not on a sandwich.
                    > >
                    > > In this way, you keep the spirit of the fast - as long as you are also
                    > > struggling to pray, and fast from sins.
                    > >
                    > > I remember when a woman with stomach problems told me she needed
                    > > yogurt during the fast. I said that was fine, if she treated it like
                    > > medicine. I then asked if she loved yogurt with jelly or preserves at
                    > > the bottom. She smiled and enthusiastically said "Yes!". I told her to
                    > > eat plain yogurt.
                    > >
                    > > The flesh is wily and insatiable. Learn to recognize its whining, and
                    > > leave it outside, like a spoiled barking dog.
                    > >
                    > > On Mon, Feb 27, 2012 at 1:21 AM, Vasily Georgevich Green
                    > > <aleksandrgeorgevich@... <mailto:aleksandrgeorgevich@...>>
                    > > wrote:
                    > >
                    > > I have a question regarding this.
                    > >
                    > > I have type 2 diabetes. Fasting IS hard because I cannot eat
                    > > potatoes, or bread, which is a lot of what is usual fasting fare,
                    > > doubly hard is living in a remote area where vegetables are scarce
                    > > in winter.
                    > >
                    > > I really want to fast every day this year but I am not sure what
                    > > do do when the doctors say not to eat the foods most people eat
                    > > during Velikiy Post
                    > >
                    > > George Green
                    > >
                    > > On 02/26/2012 11:54 PM, Seraphim Holland wrote:
                    > >>
                    > >>
                    > >> "The fast isn't hard. Sin is hard. Disease is hard.
                    > >> Being broken is hard. All those things are hard.
                    > >> Fasting is what helps us to be healed. How could it
                    > >> be hard? You see, the things that you are make
                    > >> fasting seem hard to you because fasting is helping
                    > >> you to be healed of those things. And yet we think
                    > >> fasting is hard. Don't think that."
                    > >>
                    > >> From a soon to be published sermon in print. Available in audio:
                    > >> http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-05_2009-03-01+sunday-of-forgiveness.mp3
                    > >>
                    > >> --
                    > >> Priest Seraphim Holland
                    > >> seraphim@... <mailto:seraphim@...> Cell:972
                    > >> 658-5433 <tel:972%20658-5433> Home:972 529-2754 <tel:972%20529-2754>
                    > >> ST NICHOLAS ORTHODOX CHURCH <http://www.orthodox.net> =>
                    > >> http://www.orthodox.net
                    > >> *** 708 S Chestnut, MCKINNEY, TEXAS 75070 ***
                    > >> EMAIL:http://groups.google.com/group/saint-nicholas-orthodox-church
                    > >> BLOG:http://www.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime
                    > >>
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > --
                    > > Priest Seraphim Holland
                    > > seraphim@... <mailto:seraphim@...> Cell:972
                    > > 658-5433 Home:972 529-2754
                    > > ST NICHOLAS ORTHODOX CHURCH <http://www.orthodox.net> =>
                    > > http://www.orthodox.net
                    > > *** 708 S Chestnut, MCKINNEY, TEXAS 75070 ***
                    > > EMAIL:http://groups.google.com/group/saint-nicholas-orthodox-church
                    > > BLOG:http://www.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime
                    > >
                    >
                  • frmaximos@gmail.com
                    Excellent response, Father. Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T ... From: Alex Krassovsky Sender: orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com Date: Mon, 27 Feb
                    Message 10 of 15 , Feb 28, 2012
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                      Excellent response, Father.
                      Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T

                      From: Alex Krassovsky <kasaak@...>
                      Sender: orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Mon, 27 Feb 2012 08:17:30 -0800 (PST)
                      To: <orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com>
                      ReplyTo: orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [orthodox-rocor] The fast isn't hard. Sin is hard...

                       

                      Diabetes is a lifelong fast. Those of us without it, are free to choose how we fast and - rightfully or wrongfully per our choice - when to fast.  When Great lent is over, we are free to celebrate with whatever foods we wish, while the diabetic still remains a diabetic.  Diabetes is a life-long and life-changing podvig - as every fast should be.  Allow me to quote the words of St. Seraphim of Sarov who said, that it is not so much what we eat, but how much.  What have we gained if we stuff ourselves with lenten food?  My suggestion to you, and to all my parishioners in similar situations, is to set as close a goal as you physically can when it comes to food during the fast and make up the difference in spiritual fasting - reading of canons, akathists and other prayers and of course, the regular attendance at chuch, confessions and communion.  God give you strength!

                      prot. Alexander Krassovsky
                      Sts. Peter & Paul ROC
                      Santa Rosa, CA

                      --- On Mon, 2/27/12, Shashkin | Шашкин <hristofor@...> wrote:

                      From: Shashkin | Шашкин <hristofor@...>
                      Subject: Re: [orthodox-rocor] The fast isn't hard. Sin is hard...
                      To: orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Monday, February 27, 2012, 4:22 AM



                      I would be interested in hearing responses, as I have late, late adult onset Type1.

                      Hristofor


                      On 27 Feb 2012, at 02.21, Vasily Georgevich Green wrote:

                       

                      I have a question regarding this.

                      I have type 2 diabetes.  Fasting IS hard because I cannot eat potatoes, or bread, which is a lot of what is usual fasting fare, doubly hard is living in a remote area where vegetables are scarce in winter.

                      I really want to fast every day this year but I am not sure what do do when the doctors say not to eat the foods most people eat during Velikiy Post

                      George Green

                      On 02/26/2012 11:54 PM, Seraphim Holland wrote:

                       
                      "The fast isn't hard. Sin is hard. Disease is hard. Being broken is hard. All those things are hard. Fasting is what helps us to be healed. How could it be hard? You see, the things that you are make fasting seem hard to you because fasting is helping you to be healed of those things. And yet we think fasting is hard. Don't think that."
                      From a soon to be published sermon in print. Available in audio:
                      http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-05_2009-03-01+sunday-of-forgiveness.mp3

                      --
                      Priest Seraphim Holland
                      seraphim@...  Cell:972 658-5433 Home:972 529-2754
                      ST NICHOLAS ORTHODOX CHURCH  => http://www.orthodox.net
                      *** 708 S Chestnut, MCKINNEY, TEXAS 75070 *** 
                      EMAIL:http://groups.google.com/group/saint-nicholas-orthodox-church
                      BLOG:http://www.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime






                    • Anthony Bridges
                      Fr. Seraphim, Asking your blessing, This is some of the best advice I have seen about fasting, and I think applies to many of those aging Baby Boomers who,
                      Message 11 of 15 , Feb 28, 2012
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                        Fr. Seraphim,

                        Asking your blessing,

                        This is some of the best advice I have seen about fasting, and I think applies to many of those aging "Baby Boomers" who, for one perfectly valid reason or another, have a hard time keeping a strict fast.

                        Thanks very much for passing this along.

                        I would like to ask your permission to quote you on this to others.

                        Deacon Anthony Bridges

                        PS The only thing that gave me pause was trying to think of American cheese as medicine. I say this only because it struck me as slightly ironic. It has nothing to do with your main point, which is very sound, and obviously both biblically based and in line with our Holy and Blessed Fathers.


                        On 2/28/2012 2:46 AM, Vasily Georgevich Green wrote:
                         

                        if i eat potatoes and pasta all month i will have serious physical problems; likely eating only a handful a day I will gain around 40 pounds in a month, and have kidney problems, not be able to feel my toes or fingers, and in general it's not healthy

                        diabetes exists; it's real!

                        George Green

                        On 02/27/2012 04:52 PM, Seraphim Holland wrote:

                        I do not think you have a conundrum. Make no provision for the flesh. The "flesh" is not your stomach and pancreas, and the rest of your body - it is your desires, habits, priorities, passions - anything that is contrary to the will of God.

                        Do not eat for pleasure - eat as if the food is medicine. Do you like scrambled eggs? Eat them hardboiled, without salt. Do you like tuna salad? Eat tuna out of the can without condiments. Do you love Montery Jack cheese? Eat American cheese - and not on a sandwich.

                        In this way, you keep the spirit of the fast - as long as you are also struggling to pray, and fast from sins.

                        I remember when a woman with stomach problems told me she needed yogurt during the fast. I said that was fine, if she treated it like medicine. I then asked if she loved yogurt with jelly or preserves at the bottom. She smiled and enthusiastically said "Yes!". I told her to eat plain yogurt.

                        The flesh is wily and insatiable. Learn to recognize its whining, and leave it outside, like a spoiled barking dog.

                        On Mon, Feb 27, 2012 at 1:21 AM, Vasily Georgevich Green <aleksandrgeorgevich@...> wrote:
                        I have a question regarding this.

                        I have type 2 diabetes.  Fasting IS hard because I cannot eat potatoes, or bread, which is a lot of what is usual fasting fare, doubly hard is living in a remote area where vegetables are scarce in winter.

                        I really want to fast every day this year but I am not sure what do do when the doctors say not to eat the foods most people eat during Velikiy Post

                        George Green

                        On 02/26/2012 11:54 PM, Seraphim Holland wrote:
                         
                        "Thefast isn't hard. Sin is hard. Disease is hard. Being broken is hard. All those things are hard. Fasting is what helps us to be healed. How could it be hard? You see, the things that you are make fasting seem hard to you because fasting is helping you to be healed of those things. And yet we think fasting is hard. Don't think that."
                        From a soon to be published sermon in print. Available in audio:
                        http://www.orthodox.net/sermons/great-lent-sunday-before-great-lent-05_2009-03-01+sunday-of-forgiveness.mp3

                        --
                        Priest Seraphim Holland
                        seraphim@...  Cell:972 658-5433 Home:972 529-2754
                        ST NICHOLAS ORTHODOX CHURCH  => http://www.orthodox.net
                        *** 708 S Chestnut, MCKINNEY, TEXAS 75070 *** 
                        EMAIL:http://groups.google.com/group/saint-nicholas-orthodox-church
                        BLOG:http://www.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime





                        --
                        Priest Seraphim Holland
                        seraphim@...  Cell:972 658-5433 Home:972 529-2754
                        ST NICHOLAS ORTHODOX CHURCH  => http://www.orthodox.net
                        *** 708 S Chestnut, MCKINNEY, TEXAS 75070 *** 
                        EMAIL:http://groups.google.com/group/saint-nicholas-orthodox-church
                        BLOG:http://www.orthodox.net/redeemingthetime



                      • jsbaglien
                        I am much of Fr. Seraphim s opinion. To his point, Do not eat for pleasure - eat as if food is medicine , I sometimes bless the use of pasteurized egg white
                        Message 12 of 15 , Feb 29, 2012
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                          I am much of Fr. Seraphim's opinion. To his point, "Do not eat for pleasure - eat as if food is medicine", I sometimes bless the use of pasteurized egg white to meet such medical needs. My rationale for this particular recommendation is twofold. First, it is a source of complete, high quality protein, which can be consumed in a number of ways. Second, there is little pleasure in consuming it in any form, and so it's not much of a temptation for anyone else in the family to see someone else having it, as would be the case with 'regular' non-Lenten food.

                          Priest James Baglien



                          --- In orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com, Seraphim Holland <seraphim@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > I do not think you have a conundrum. Make no provision for the flesh. The
                          > "flesh" is not your stomach and pancreas, and the rest of your body - it is
                          > your desires, habits, priorities, passions - anything that is contrary to
                          > the will of God.
                          >
                          > Do not eat for pleasure - eat as if the food is medicine. Do you like
                          > scrambled eggs? Eat them hardboiled, without salt. Do you like tuna salad?
                          > Eat tuna out of the can without condiments. Do you love Montery Jack
                          > cheese? Eat American cheese - and not on a sandwich.
                          >
                          > In this way, you keep the spirit of the fast - as long as you are also
                          > struggling to pray, and fast from sins.
                          >
                          > I remember when a woman with stomach problems told me she needed yogurt
                          > during the fast. I said that was fine, if she treated it like medicine. I
                          > then asked if she loved yogurt with jelly or preserves at the bottom. She
                          > smiled and enthusiastically said "Yes!". I told her to eat plain yogurt.
                          >
                          > The flesh is wily and insatiable. Learn to recognize its whining, and leave
                          > it outside, like a spoiled barking dog.
                          >
                        • Rudolph Carrera
                          It s posts like this, good wisdom given with a gentle heart by a collection of good men, that has kept me on this mailing list. I have to take in a lot of
                          Message 13 of 15 , Mar 1, 2012
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                            It's posts like this, good wisdom given with a gentle heart by a collection of good men, that has kept me on this mailing list.  I have to take in a lot of protein after having a major surgery.  One can do far worse than egg whites, and they mix relatively well with spinach.  It's not the best eating, but it's allowed me to recover from my wounds rather quickly.

                            Best,

                            Rudy

                            On Thu, Mar 1, 2012 at 3:02 AM, jsbaglien <jbaglien@...> wrote:
                             



                            I am much of Fr. Seraphim's opinion. To his point, "Do not eat for pleasure - eat as if food is medicine", I sometimes bless the use of pasteurized egg white to meet such medical needs. My rationale for this particular recommendation is twofold. First, it is a source of complete, high quality protein, which can be consumed in a number of ways. Second, there is little pleasure in consuming it in any form, and so it's not much of a temptation for anyone else in the family to see someone else having it, as would be the case with 'regular' non-Lenten food.

                            Priest James Baglien



                            --- In orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com, Seraphim Holland <seraphim@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > I do not think you have a conundrum. Make no provision for the flesh. The
                            > "flesh" is not your stomach and pancreas, and the rest of your body - it is
                            > your desires, habits, priorities, passions - anything that is contrary to
                            > the will of God.
                            >
                            > Do not eat for pleasure - eat as if the food is medicine. Do you like
                            > scrambled eggs? Eat them hardboiled, without salt. Do you like tuna salad?
                            > Eat tuna out of the can without condiments. Do you love Montery Jack
                            > cheese? Eat American cheese - and not on a sandwich.
                            >
                            > In this way, you keep the spirit of the fast - as long as you are also
                            > struggling to pray, and fast from sins.
                            >
                            > I remember when a woman with stomach problems told me she needed yogurt
                            > during the fast. I said that was fine, if she treated it like medicine. I
                            > then asked if she loved yogurt with jelly or preserves at the bottom. She
                            > smiled and enthusiastically said "Yes!". I told her to eat plain yogurt.
                            >
                            > The flesh is wily and insatiable. Learn to recognize its whining, and leave
                            > it outside, like a spoiled barking dog.
                            >




                            --
                            Regards,

                            Rudy Carrera
                            Los Angeles, California, USA - Skopje, Macedonia - Naples, Italy
                            http://clcx.org/
                            http://steinblom.info/
                            http://rudycarrera.com/
                            http://amiscellany.info/
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