Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

From Today's Gospel

Expand Messages
  • Fr. John Whiteford
    Luke 12:20 is translated in the King James Version as: But God said unto him, Thou fool, this night thy soul shall be required of thee: then whose shall those
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 4, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Luke 12:20 is translated in the King James Version as:

      "But God said unto him, Thou fool, this night thy soul shall be required of thee: then whose shall those things be, which thou hast provided?"

      In the commentary of Blessed Theophylact, he makes a point about the verb translated by the KJV in the passive voice as "shall be required", but he points out that that it is is in the active voice, third person, plural -- and so should be "they shall require".

      The Youngs Literal Translation has it as:

      "And God said to him, Unthinking one! this night thy soul they shall require from thee, and what things thou didst prepare -- to whom shall they be?" 

      Blessed Theophylact says "Notice also the words "they will require". Like some stern imperial officers demanding tribute, the fearsome angels will ask for your souls, and you will not want to give it because you love this life and claim the things of this life as your own. But they do not demand the soul of a righteous man, because he himself commits his soul into the hands of God and Father of spirits, and he does so with joy and gladness, not in the least bit grieved that he is handing over his soul to God. For him the body is only a light burden, easily shed. But the sinner has made his soul fleshy, something difficult to separate from the body. This is why the soul must be demanded of him, the same way that harsh tax collectors treat debtors who refuse to pay what is due. See that the Lord did not say, "I shall require thy soul of thee," but, "they shall require.""
       
      Presbyter John Whiteford
      St. Jonah Orthodox Church
      Parish Home Page: http://www.saintjonah.org/
      ROCOR Discussion Group: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orthodox-rocor/
      Parish News: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/saintjonah/
      Blog: http://fatherjohn.blogspot.com/
      Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/frjohnwhiteford

      "This is the cause of all evils: the ignorance of the Scriptures. We go into battle without arms, and how ought we to come off safe?" -St. John Chrysostom, Homily IX on Colossians.



    • Fr. Aidan
      The Douay-Rheims-Challoner version, an excellent English translation of the Holy Scriptures, has this night do they require. This is present tense, and the
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 4, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        The Douay-Rheims-Challoner version, an excellent English translation of the Holy Scriptures, has "this night do they require." This is present tense, and the Slavonic verb is "ist'azhut," which appears to my not-so-erudite eyes to be present tense (I guess "ist'azhuyet" would be future tense?). The Latin verb here is "repetunt," which in the "redoubling" connotations of the prefix "re-" perfectly captures Bl. Theophylact's underscoring of the urgency and effort.

        I wonder if there is a difference in tense between the Orthodox Greek text and the Orthodox Latin and Slavonic texts. Is the Greek verb really in future tense?

        Once again, the Douay-Rheims proves to be a good version for Orthodox usage. There are various priests in our ROCOR who really like the Douay-Rheims version and use it in various ways. Fr. George Lardas is one. It is also a little bit easier to understand than the King James version, for modern English-speakers.

        A most stimulating discussion!

        Fr. Aidan+
        sinner


        From: Fr. John Whiteford <frjohnwhiteford@...>
        To: The ROCOR Clergy <rocorclergy@yahoogroups.com>; The Rocor List <orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, December 4, 2011 7:03 AM
        Subject: [rocorclergy] From Today's Gospel

         
        Luke 12:20 is translated in the King James Version as:

        "But God said unto him, Thou fool, this night thy soul shall be required of thee: then whose shall those things be, which thou hast provided?"

        In the commentary of Blessed Theophylact, he makes a point about the verb translated by the KJV in the passive voice as "shall be required", but he points out that that it is is in the active voice, third person, plural -- and so should be "they shall require".

        The Youngs Literal Translation has it as:

        "And God said to him, Unthinking one! this night thy soul they shall require from thee, and what things thou didst prepare -- to whom shall they be?" 

        Blessed Theophylact says "Notice also the words "they will require". Like some stern imperial officers demanding tribute, the fearsome angels will ask for your souls, and you will not want to give it because you love this life and claim the things of this life as your own. But they do not demand the soul of a righteous man, because he himself commits his soul into the hands of God and Father of spirits, and he does so with joy and gladness, not in the least bit grieved that he is handing over his soul to God. For him the body is only a light burden, easily shed. But the sinner has made his soul fleshy, something difficult to separate from the body. This is why the soul must be demanded of him, the same way that harsh tax collectors treat debtors who refuse to pay what is due. See that the Lord did not say, "I shall require thy soul of thee," but, "they shall require.""
         
        Presbyter John Whiteford
        St. Jonah Orthodox Church
        Parish Home Page: http://www.saintjonah.org/
        ROCOR Discussion Group: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orthodox-rocor/
        Parish News: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/saintjonah/
        Blog: http://fatherjohn.blogspot.com/
        Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/frjohnwhiteford%20

        "This is the cause of all evils: the ignorance of the Scriptures. We go into battle without arms, and how ought we to come off safe?" -St. John Chrysostom, Homily IX on Colossians.





      • Fr. John Whiteford
        One thing I noticed this afternoon is that if you have a KJV version with full margin notes, it has a margin note that says: Gr[eek], do they require thy
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 4, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          One thing I noticed this afternoon is that if you have a KJV version with full margin notes, it has a margin note that says: "Gr[eek], do they require thy soul."
           
          Presbyter John Whiteford
          St. Jonah Orthodox Church
          Parish Home Page: http://www.saintjonah.org/
          ROCOR Discussion Group: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orthodox-rocor/
          Parish News: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/saintjonah/
          Blog: http://fatherjohn.blogspot.com/
          Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/frjohnwhiteford

          "This is the cause of all evils: the ignorance of the Scriptures. We go into battle without arms, and how ought we to come off safe?" -St. John Chrysostom, Homily IX on Colossians.





          From: Fr. Aidan <hieromonachusaidanus@...>
          To: "rocorclergy@yahoogroups.com" <rocorclergy@yahoogroups.com>; The Rocor List <orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, December 4, 2011 8:15 PM
          Subject: [orthodox-rocor] Re: [rocorclergy] From Today's Gospel



          The Douay-Rheims-Challoner version, an excellent English translation of the Holy Scriptures, has "this night do they require." This is present tense, and the Slavonic verb is "ist'azhut," which appears to my not-so-erudite eyes to be present tense (I guess "ist'azhuyet" would be future tense?). The Latin verb here is "repetunt," which in the "redoubling" connotations of the prefix "re-" perfectly captures Bl. Theophylact's underscoring of the urgency and effort.

          I wonder if there is a difference in tense between the Orthodox Greek text and the Orthodox Latin and Slavonic texts. Is the Greek verb really in future tense?

          Once again, the Douay-Rheims proves to be a good version for Orthodox usage. There are various priests in our ROCOR who really like the Douay-Rheims version and use it in various ways. Fr. George Lardas is one. It is also a little bit easier to understand than the King James version, for modern English-speakers.

          A most stimulating discussion!

          Fr. Aidan+
          sinner


          From: Fr. John Whiteford <frjohnwhiteford@...>
          To: The ROCOR Clergy <rocorclergy@yahoogroups.com>; The Rocor List <orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, December 4, 2011 7:03 AM
          Subject: [rocorclergy] From Today's Gospel

           
          Luke 12:20 is translated in the King James Version as:

          "But God said unto him, Thou fool, this night thy soul shall be required of thee: then whose shall those things be, which thou hast provided?"

          In the commentary of Blessed Theophylact, he makes a point about the verb translated by the KJV in the passive voice as "shall be required", but he points out that that it is is in the active voice, third person, plural -- and so should be "they shall require".

          The Youngs Literal Translation has it as:

          "And God said to him, Unthinking one! this night thy soul they shall require from thee, and what things thou didst prepare -- to whom shall they be?" 

          Blessed Theophylact says "Notice also the words "they will require". Like some stern imperial officers demanding tribute, the fearsome angels will ask for your souls, and you will not want to give it because you love this life and claim the things of this life as your own. But they do not demand the soul of a righteous man, because he himself commits his soul into the hands of God and Father of spirits, and he does so with joy and gladness, not in the least bit grieved that he is handing over his soul to God. For him the body is only a light burden, easily shed. But the sinner has made his soul fleshy, something difficult to separate from the body. This is why the soul must be demanded of him, the same way that harsh tax collectors treat debtors who refuse to pay what is due. See that the Lord did not say, "I shall require thy soul of thee," but, "they shall require.""
           
          Presbyter John Whiteford
          St. Jonah Orthodox Church
          Parish Home Page: http://www.saintjonah.org/
          ROCOR Discussion Group: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orthodox-rocor/
          Parish News: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/saintjonah/
          Blog: http://fatherjohn.blogspot.com/
          Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/frjohnwhiteford%20

          "This is the cause of all evils: the ignorance of the Scriptures. We go into battle without arms, and how ought we to come off safe?" -St. John Chrysostom, Homily IX on Colossians.









        • Meg Lark
          ... Father Aidan, bless! Could you please comment on the difference in translation of the 22nd Psalm (23rd in the Masoretic) between the Douay-Rheims and the
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 5, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            On Sun, Dec 4, 2011 at 9:15 PM, Fr. Aidan <hieromonachusaidanus@...> wrote:
             

            Once again, the Douay-Rheims proves to be a good version for Orthodox usage. There are various priests in our ROCOR who really like the Douay-Rheims version and use it in various ways. Fr. George Lardas is one. It is also a little bit easier to understand than the King James version, for modern English-speakers.

             
             
            Father Aidan, bless!  Could you please comment on the difference in translation of the 22nd Psalm (23rd in the Masoretic) between the Douay-Rheims and the KJV?  Overall I'd trust the Douay-Rheims, but this one discrepancy really bothers me -- the DR doesn't even mention anything about the Lord being a Shepherd, at least, not the DR I've seen in the USA.  Thanks! 
             
            Kissing your right hand,
            Meg Lark
          • Rev. Patrick Irish
            Dear All, http://drbo.org/chapter/21022.htm Ps. 22/23 Douay Rheims. Dominus Regit Me. More problematic is Gen 3:15. http://drbo.org/chapter/01003.htm Rev.
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 6, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Dear All,

              http://drbo.org/chapter/21022.htm Ps. 22/23 Douay Rheims. Dominus Regit Me.
              More problematic is

              Gen 3:15.
              http://drbo.org/chapter/01003.htm


              Rev. Patrick Irish, Priest.

              --- On Mon, 12/5/11, Meg Lark <woolfolk3@...> wrote:

              From: Meg Lark <woolfolk3@...>
              Subject: Re: [orthodox-rocor] Re: [rocorclergy] From Today's Gospel
              To: orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Monday, December 5, 2011, 11:28 AM



              On Sun, Dec 4, 2011 at 9:15 PM, Fr. Aidan <hieromonachusaidanus@...> wrote:
               

              Once again, the Douay-Rheims proves to be a good version for Orthodox usage. There are various priests in our ROCOR who really like the Douay-Rheims version and use it in various ways. Fr. George Lardas is one. It is also a little bit easier to understand than the King James version, for modern English-speakers.

               
               
              Father Aidan, bless!  Could you please comment on the difference in translation of the 22nd Psalm (23rd in the Masoretic) between the Douay-Rheims and the KJV?  Overall I'd trust the Douay-Rheims, but this one discrepancy really bothers me -- the DR doesn't even mention anything about the Lord being a Shepherd, at least, not the DR I've seen in the USA.  Thanks! 
               
              Kissing your right hand,
              Meg Lark


            • German Ciuba
              I don t think there is anything wrong with the AV rendering shall be required , since sometimes, as is common in modern Russian, the third person plural is
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 7, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                I don't think there is anything wrong with the AV rendering "shall be required", since sometimes, as is common in modern Russian, the third person plural is used for an impersonal construction that could equally well be expressed by a passive form. For example: "Govoryat"  (prefacing a remark or a proverb)- they say, people say, it is said. "Tak ne delayut" - they do not do it so, they do not do it in such a way, that's not the way it is done. You can see how one easily slips from an impersonal active to a passive form.
                Blessed Theophylact is giving an interpretation, reading something into the text, supplying an answer to a reader's possible question as to who exactly it is that will demand the soul.
                Although I found that one dictionary gives the verb istyazati as an imperfective, so that istyazhut would be present tense, it seems more likely, looking at other dictionaries (which do not specify the aspect of the verb) that istyazati is perfective (with istyazovati being the imperfective), so that istyazhut would be future tense. That istyazhut was understood to be future tense is confirmed by the fact that the Russian Bible says voz'mut - they will take. 
                I find the the Douay Bible to be helpful sometimes for comparisons, but I do not honestly think it surpasses the AV for style. It is more literal and Latinate, seeking to be exactly faithful to its original, the Latin Vulgate. 
                To the question about "the Lord is my shepherd", further in this thread: In the Latin Vulgate this psalm verse is "Dominus regit me" - the Lord rules or directs me. It is left for a commentator to add that in the Hebrew it means "the Lord is my shepherd." Since the translators of the AV were using the Hebrew, they rendered it "the Lord is my shepherd." The Slavonic is "Gospod' paset mya." Paset is from the verb pasti, pasu - to watch, to guard, to protect. It is related both to pastyr' or pastukh - shepherd - and, through the related form spasti, spasu - to Spas or Spasitel', the Slavonic and Russian words for the Saviour, Christ. In a modern Russian dictionary the verb is defined as specifically referring to the act of a shepherd leading his flock to feed in a pasture. The English word pasture is from the Latin pasco, pascere - to lead to pasture, to feed, to nourish; this is what a shepherd does. Sometimes the Slavonic pasti is translated feed, as in the Saviour's words to St Peter - Pasi agntsy moya, Pasi ovtsy moya - Feed My lambs, Feed My sheep. A Russian etymological dictionary s.v. pasti  says "Sravnivayut" - They compare it, or it is compared, with the Latin pasco. In order for the shepherd to take care of his sheep, he must lead them out to feed them; thus the word has the dual senses of lead and feed, a nice juxtaposition.
                The words of the AV have so entered into and influenced our language that the reader is surprised to hear anything other than "The Lord is my shepherd," which, of course, is a beautiful thought.
                Abbot German Ciuba

                --- On Sun, 12/4/11, Fr. Aidan <hieromonachusaidanus@...> wrote:

                From: Fr. Aidan <hieromonachusaidanus@...>
                Subject: [orthodox-rocor] Re: [rocorclergy] From Today's Gospel
                To: "rocorclergy@yahoogroups.com" <rocorclergy@yahoogroups.com>, "The Rocor List" <orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com>
                Received: Sunday, December 4, 2011, 9:15 PM

                 

                The Douay-Rheims-Challoner version, an excellent English translation of the Holy Scriptures, has "this night do they require." This is present tense, and the Slavonic verb is "ist'azhut," which appears to my not-so-erudite eyes to be present tense (I guess "ist'azhuyet" would be future tense?). The Latin verb here is "repetunt," which in the "redoubling" connotations of the prefix "re-" perfectly captures Bl. Theophylact's underscoring of the urgency and effort.

                I wonder if there is a difference in tense between the Orthodox Greek text and the Orthodox Latin and Slavonic texts. Is the Greek verb really in future tense?

                Once again, the Douay-Rheims proves to be a good version for Orthodox usage. There are various priests in our ROCOR who really like the Douay-Rheims version and use it in various ways. Fr. George Lardas is one. It is also a little bit easier to understand than the King James version, for modern English-speakers.

                A most stimulating discussion!

                Fr. Aidan+
                sinner


                From: Fr. John Whiteford <frjohnwhiteford@...>
                To: The ROCOR Clergy <rocorclergy@yahoogroups.com>; The Rocor List <orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Sunday, December 4, 2011 7:03 AM
                Subject: [rocorclergy] From Today's Gospel

                 
                Luke 12:20 is translated in the King James Version as:

                "But God said unto him, Thou fool, this night thy soul shall be required of thee: then whose shall those things be, which thou hast provided?"

                In the commentary of Blessed Theophylact, he makes a point about the verb translated by the KJV in the passive voice as "shall be required", but he points out that that it is is in the active voice, third person, plural -- and so should be "they shall require".

                The Youngs Literal Translation has it as:

                "And God said to him, Unthinking one! this night thy soul they shall require from thee, and what things thou didst prepare -- to whom shall they be?" 

                Blessed Theophylact says "Notice also the words "they will require". Like some stern imperial officers demanding tribute, the fearsome angels will ask for your souls, and you will not want to give it because you love this life and claim the things of this life as your own. But they do not demand the soul of a righteous man, because he himself commits his soul into the hands of God and Father of spirits, and he does so with joy and gladness, not in the least bit grieved that he is handing over his soul to God. For him the body is only a light burden, easily shed. But the sinner has made his soul fleshy, something difficult to separate from the body. This is why the soul must be demanded of him, the same way that harsh tax collectors treat debtors who refuse to pay what is due. See that the Lord did not say, "I shall require thy soul of thee," but, "they shall require.""
                 
                Presbyter John Whiteford
                St. Jonah Orthodox Church
                Parish Home Page: http://www.saintjonah.org/
                ROCOR Discussion Group: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orthodox-rocor/
                Parish News: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/saintjonah/
                Blog: http://fatherjohn.blogspot.com/
                Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/frjohnwhiteford%20

                "This is the cause of all evils: the ignorance of the Scriptures. We go into battle without arms, and how ought we to come off safe?" -St. John Chrysostom, Homily IX on Colossians.





              • Fr. John Whiteford
                The Word Biblical Commentary, which is a highly regarded scholarly Protestant commentary series, translates this as this very night you will be asked to give
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 8, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  The Word Biblical Commentary, which is a highly regarded scholarly Protestant commentary series, translates this as "this very night you will be asked to give back your soul", however, it has a footnote which states "Lit[erally]. "they will ask [back] from your soul."

                  And in the commentary section, it says: "and for apaitousin it is difficult to see Luke using the impersonal third person plural in place of the passive(the same idiom, i.e., the request for the return of the soul, is found ub Wis 15:8, but with the passive form of the verb)." And so they clearly do not see this as a usual construction which would normally be used if the third person plural was being used only in an idiomatic way of saying something that did not really imply the third person plural.

                  Wisdom 15:8, by the way, says "And employing his labours lewdly, he maketh a vain god of the same clay, even he which a little before was made of earth himself, and within a little while after returneth to the same, out when his life which was lent him shall be demanded."

                  The word in question, in Wisdom 15:8 is "apaitetheis". My Greek is rusty, but I believe that is singular, rather than plural.
                   
                  Presbyter John Whiteford
                  St. Jonah Orthodox Church
                  Parish Home Page: http://www.saintjonah.org/
                  ROCOR Discussion Group: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orthodox-rocor/
                  Parish News: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/saintjonah/
                  Blog: http://fatherjohn.blogspot.com/
                  Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/frjohnwhiteford

                  "This is the cause of all evils: the ignorance of the Scriptures. We go into battle without arms, and how ought we to come off safe?" -St. John Chrysostom, Homily IX on Colossians.





                  From: German Ciuba <gciuba@...>
                  To: orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Thursday, December 8, 2011 1:34 AM
                  Subject: Re: [orthodox-rocor] Re: [rocorclergy] From Today's Gospel



                  I don't think there is anything wrong with the AV rendering "shall be required", since sometimes, as is common in modern Russian, the third person plural is used for an impersonal construction that could equally well be expressed by a passive form. For example: "Govoryat"  (prefacing a remark or a proverb)- they say, people say, it is said. "Tak ne delayut" - they do not do it so, they do not do it in such a way, that's not the way it is done. You can see how one easily slips from an impersonal active to a passive form.
                  Blessed Theophylact is giving an interpretation, reading something into the text, supplying an answer to a reader's possible question as to who exactly it is that will demand the soul.
                  Although I found that one dictionary gives the verb istyazati as an imperfective, so that istyazhut would be present tense, it seems more likely, looking at other dictionaries (which do not specify the aspect of the verb) that istyazati is perfective (with istyazovati being the imperfective), so that istyazhut would be future tense. That istyazhut was understood to be future tense is confirmed by the fact that the Russian Bible says voz'mut - they will take. 
                  I find the the Douay Bible to be helpful sometimes for comparisons, but I do not honestly think it surpasses the AV for style. It is more literal and Latinate, seeking to be exactly faithful to its original, the Latin Vulgate. 
                  To the question about "the Lord is my shepherd", further in this thread: In the Latin Vulgate this psalm verse is "Dominus regit me" - the Lord rules or directs me. It is left for a commentator to add that in the Hebrew it means "the Lord is my shepherd." Since the translators of the AV were using the Hebrew, they rendered it "the Lord is my shepherd." The Slavonic is "Gospod' paset mya." Paset is from the verb pasti, pasu - to watch, to guard, to protect. It is related both to pastyr' or pastukh - shepherd - and, through the related form spasti, spasu - to Spas or Spasitel', the Slavonic and Russian words for the Saviour, Christ. In a modern Russian dictionary the verb is defined as specifically referring to the act of a shepherd leading his flock to feed in a pasture. The English word pasture is from the Latin pasco, pascere - to lead to pasture, to feed, to nourish; this is what a shepherd does. Sometimes the Slavonic pasti is translated feed, as in the Saviour's words to St Peter - Pasi agntsy moya, Pasi ovtsy moya - Feed My lambs, Feed My sheep. A Russian etymological dictionary s.v. pasti  says "Sravnivayut" - They compare it, or it is compared, with the Latin pasco. In order for the shepherd to take care of his sheep, he must lead them out to feed them; thus the word has the dual senses of lead and feed, a nice juxtaposition.
                  The words of the AV have so entered into and influenced our language that the reader is surprised to hear anything other than "The Lord is my shepherd," which, of course, is a beautiful thought.
                  Abbot German Ciuba

                  --- On Sun, 12/4/11, Fr. Aidan <hieromonachusaidanus@...> wrote:

                  From: Fr. Aidan <hieromonachusaidanus@...>
                  Subject: [orthodox-rocor] Re: [rocorclergy] From Today's Gospel
                  To: "rocorclergy@yahoogroups.com" <rocorclergy@yahoogroups.com>, "The Rocor List" <orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com>
                  Received: Sunday, December 4, 2011, 9:15 PM

                   
                  The Douay-Rheims-Challoner version, an excellent English translation of the Holy Scriptures, has "this night do they require." This is present tense, and the Slavonic verb is "ist'azhut," which appears to my not-so-erudite eyes to be present tense (I guess "ist'azhuyet" would be future tense?). The Latin verb here is "repetunt," which in the "redoubling" connotations of the prefix "re-" perfectly captures Bl. Theophylact's underscoring of the urgency and effort.

                  I wonder if there is a difference in tense between the Orthodox Greek text and the Orthodox Latin and Slavonic texts. Is the Greek verb really in future tense?

                  Once again, the Douay-Rheims proves to be a good version for Orthodox usage. There are various priests in our ROCOR who really like the Douay-Rheims version and use it in various ways. Fr. George Lardas is one. It is also a little bit easier to understand than the King James version, for modern English-speakers.

                  A most stimulating discussion!

                  Fr. Aidan+
                  sinner


                  From: Fr. John Whiteford <frjohnwhiteford@...>
                  To: The ROCOR Clergy <rocorclergy@yahoogroups.com>; The Rocor List <orthodox-rocor@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Sunday, December 4, 2011 7:03 AM
                  Subject: [rocorclergy] From Today's Gospel

                   
                  Luke 12:20 is translated in the King James Version as:

                  "But God said unto him, Thou fool, this night thy soul shall be required of thee: then whose shall those things be, which thou hast provided?"

                  In the commentary of Blessed Theophylact, he makes a point about the verb translated by the KJV in the passive voice as "shall be required", but he points out that that it is is in the active voice, third person, plural -- and so should be "they shall require".

                  The Youngs Literal Translation has it as:

                  "And God said to him, Unthinking one! this night thy soul they shall require from thee, and what things thou didst prepare -- to whom shall they be?" 

                  Blessed Theophylact says "Notice also the words "they will require". Like some stern imperial officers demanding tribute, the fearsome angels will ask for your souls, and you will not want to give it because you love this life and claim the things of this life as your own. But they do not demand the soul of a righteous man, because he himself commits his soul into the hands of God and Father of spirits, and he does so with joy and gladness, not in the least bit grieved that he is handing over his soul to God. For him the body is only a light burden, easily shed. But the sinner has made his soul fleshy, something difficult to separate from the body. This is why the soul must be demanded of him, the same way that harsh tax collectors treat debtors who refuse to pay what is due. See that the Lord did not say, "I shall require thy soul of thee," but, "they shall require.""
                   
                  Presbyter John Whiteford
                  St. Jonah Orthodox Church
                  Parish Home Page: http://www.saintjonah.org/
                  ROCOR Discussion Group: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orthodox-rocor/
                  Parish News: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/saintjonah/
                  Blog: http://fatherjohn.blogspot.com/
                  Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/frjohnwhiteford%20

                  "This is the cause of all evils: the ignorance of the Scriptures. We go into battle without arms, and how ought we to come off safe?" -St. John Chrysostom, Homily IX on Colossians.









                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.