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Re: [orthodox-readers] Re: Typica Questions

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  • Justin Zamora
    ... I wear a sticharion when I read the Epistle. Since I am usually not serving in the altar, I go into the altar and vest just before the Trisagion. I
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 12, 2002
      On Tue, Feb 12, 2002 at 04:22:17PM -0000, dollpka wrote:
      > I have wondered about this myself, but have never seen this
      > actually happen. Our readers always just read in cassock and
      > put on their sticharion for communion. Sometimes, even the latter
      > is not done. It certainly would seem more festive if nothing
      > else for the reader to wear his sticharion during the Epistle
      > reading.
      > In Christ,
      > Kenneth Doll
      >
      > P.S. I have never seen this in Russian, OCA, etc. churches.
      > I have seen (probably) nonreaders in Greek churches actually
      > vested as subdeacons (with crossed "stole", pardon the lack of
      > correct word here) reading the Epistle.

      I wear a sticharion when I read the Epistle. Since I am usually not
      serving in the altar, I go into the altar and vest just before the
      Trisagion. I unvest after the Gospel. If I am receiving communion, I
      will vest during the priest's communion.

      Justin
    • Reader Michael J. Bishop
      Dear Kenneth, It is my experience that generally altar servers in the Greek Archdiocese and many in the Antiochian Archdiocese wear oraria (orarion is the
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 12, 2002
        Dear Kenneth,

        It is my experience that generally altar servers in the Greek Archdiocese and
        many in the Antiochian Archdiocese wear oraria (orarion is the singular, the
        more Orthodox word for stole). The difference between them and a subdeacon
        seems to be that the oraria of the altar servers are not crossed in front and
        those of the subdeacon are.

        Just to confuse the issue, in the OCA there are many of us running around
        wearing oraria but are not ordained subdeacons. I am a tonsured Reader but I
        serve as a Subdeacon and vest as one. The only time that I do vest and not
        wear an orarion is when I am in a parish where the priest does not allow it,
        but most priests do not object. When I went up to New Jersey to serve for a
        parish patronal feast day, the priest specifically told me to bring an
        orarion since he does not have any for Subdeacons.

        As I said, I'm a tonsured Reader and serve as a Subdeacon. When my Bishop
        tonsured me a Reader, he also tonsured Yaroslave and immediately he ordained
        him a Subdeacon (since he was married) and vested me as a Subdeacon. When he
        vested Philip to serve as a Subdeacon, he publicly told him that he is now
        allowed to wear the orarion any time he serves. Philip was not tonsured a
        Reader.

        This is the second group of those running around wearing oraria but are not
        Subdeacons. In some cases it is a kind of an award. Philip has been a
        faithful server for about ten years or so. At the time he was 18 when the
        Bishop vestsed him.

        About three years before Philip was vested with the oraron, two other servers
        were also vested by the same Bishop. The only problem is that the parish did
        not have oraria for them at the time. Mr. Tom usually wore my white orarion
        and Daniel usually wore my gold and I usually wore my velvet maroon. During
        Lent I wore the purple on Sunday and black on weekdays and Daniel did the
        opposite and Mr. Tom wore my maroon. Eventually we did get complete
        vestments for everybody.

        One day Daniel and I were talking about ranks and services and he told me
        that the Bishop said that he is an Archserver and I'm an Archreader. I think
        that the Bishop was probably joking, but I'm not sure. But now I do use the
        terms. When I was the head server at my old parish and we had three
        Subdeacons, often I would use the Armenian term "Stole bearer" to be a little
        more correct for some people. Another Bishop told me that we are all
        Subdeacons. But my Bishop told me that my title is "Reader" andd that is the
        title that I normally use. Some priests would say "Reader Michael,
        Subdeacon."

        I'm pointing these things out to raise questions and I hope that I will get
        more insights from others.

        As far as wearing a stikharion when receiving Communion, I am not sure that
        Archbishop HERMAN would appreciate it if I were to do that at the annual
        pilgrim at St. Tikhon's Monastery. But I do like the idea. It would be
        interesting to find out how many Readers wear a cassock when they go to the
        pilgrim there or to Education Day at St. Vladimir's Seminary. I wear my
        cassock at St. Tikhon's but not as St. Vladimir's. If I go to the Summer
        Institute, I will wear my cassock there. It is possible that I might be in
        cassock this year. It depends on what my priest tells me to do.

        Reader Michael


        dollpka wrote:

        > Dear Daniel,
        > I have wondered about this myself, but have never seen this
        > actually happen. Our readers always just read in cassock and
        > put on their sticharion for communion. Sometimes, even the latter
        > is not done. It certainly would seem more festive if nothing
        > else for the reader to wear his sticharion during the Epistle
        > reading.
        > In Christ,
        > Kenneth Doll
        >
        > P.S. I have never seen this in Russian, OCA, etc. churches.
        > I have seen (probably) nonreaders in Greek churches actually
        > vested as subdeacons (with crossed "stole", pardon the lack of
        > correct word here) reading the Epistle.
        >
        > --- In orthodox-readers@y..., Daniel Olson <daniel@k...> wrote:
        > > As an exception to the above, if a reader is appointed to read the
        > > Epistle at the Divine Liturgy, he should perform the reading vested
        > > in his sticharion. In such a case, the reader should receive the
        > > priest's blessing and then put on the sticharion before the Liturgy
        > > begins.
        >
        > > Daniel Olson
        >
        >
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        --
        Reader Michael J. Bishop
        12 E Read St
        Baltimore MD 21202-2459
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        410-752-7362 fax/modem

        Personal web site: http://www.Michael-Bishop.com and
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      • Daniel Olson
        ... The reading of the Epistle during the Divine Liturgy is the most significant liturgical function that the reader can perform. We would rightly be
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 13, 2002
          On 12 Feb 2002, Kenneth Doll wrote:

          >> As an exception to the above, if a reader is appointed to read the
          >> Epistle at the Divine Liturgy, he should perform the reading vested
          >> in his sticharion. In such a case, the reader should receive the
          >> priest's blessing and then put on the sticharion before the Liturgy
          >> begins.

          > I have wondered about this myself, but have never seen this actually happen.

          The reading of the Epistle during the Divine Liturgy is the most significant
          liturgical function that the reader can perform. We would rightly be
          scandalized if the priest or deacon did not perform their liturgical
          functions properly vested. Should we not hold our readers to the same high
          standard?

          > Our readers always just read in cassock and put on their sticharion for
          communion. Sometimes, even the latter is not done.

          Such practices seem to indicate a lack of understanding of the reader's true
          liturgical function.

          > It certainly would seem more festive if nothing else for the reader to wear
          his sticharion during the Epistle reading.

          Yes, it certainly does add to the solemnity of the service if the reader is
          vested while reading the Epistle. This is something that we should always
          be aware of and try to promote.

          As for when the reader should put on the sticharion, this may vary. Some
          readers vest during the Trisagion. Personally, I think that it is more
          convenient for the reader to vest before the Liturgy begins (as I indicated
          in my earlier post).

          If the reader is also planning to receive Holy Communion, I think that he
          should just remain vested after reading the Epistle. It makes little sense
          for him to take off the sticharion after reading the Epistle and then put it
          back on again for Communion.

          Daniel Olson
        • Timothy Copple
          ... From: Daniel Olson To: Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2002 12:25 PM Subject: [orthodox-readers]
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 13, 2002
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Daniel Olson" <daniel@...>
            To: <orthodox-readers@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2002 12:25 PM
            Subject: [orthodox-readers] Re: Typica Questions


            > On 12 Feb 2002, Kenneth Doll wrote:
            >
            > >> As an exception to the above, if a reader is appointed to read the
            > >> Epistle at the Divine Liturgy, he should perform the reading vested
            > >> in his sticharion. In such a case, the reader should receive the
            > >> priest's blessing and then put on the sticharion before the Liturgy
            > >> begins.

            Thanks to all for this discussion. Whether it is because I'm in a convert
            parish with a convert priest, or whether we have just never had extra
            sticharion, it has never come up that this is expected or part of the reader
            deal (going into my fifth year of being a reader), this is the first I've
            heard that a reader vest in anything when reading the Epistle, much less
            taking communion (which we have always done along with the congregation,
            though as first in line). The only time I've vested for anything is the two
            or three times I've helped in the sanctuary, and then it was in the normal
            altar boy stuff, not a sticharion. So, this is definately an education for
            me. Thanks.


            Rdr. Timothy Copple
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