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Re: The Reader, Church Propriety, & St. John Chrysostom

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  • mogiljan_2
    Christ is Risen! On an unrelated note, our priest is retiring this Aug. 31. If anyone knows of a priest seeking employment, please let me know offlist. Our
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 5, 2013
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      Christ is Risen!
      On an unrelated note, our priest is retiring this Aug. 31. If anyone
      knows of a priest seeking employment, please let me know offlist. Our
      bishop could use some help in this matter.


      On Wed, Jun 5, 2013, at 02:45 PM, polychrony wrote:


      The message was that the Reader is one of honor, propriety, and
      leadership; and, regrettably has been denigrated (largely, I was say,
      the fault of the higher clergy). Rationales such as "I don't have
      anyone who can read!" is itself indicting.

      --
      http://www.fastmail.fm - Accessible with your email software
      or over the web



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • infowolf1
      The Church is unchanging only in core theology, there have always been local variations in other things, the sort of things someone called tradition with a
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 9, 2013
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        The Church is unchanging only in core theology, there have always been local variations in other things, the sort of things someone called tradition with a small t. As time passed some variations became general. Even in The Holy Canons you find some changes as in earlier a deacon could declare he intended to marry at ordination and be free to do so later but not if he didn't so declare, which was changed later.


        Standing developed in adopting the formal style of Byzantine court protocol, but reference to sitting is in St. James Epistle. If your jurisdiction does procedure A you do procedure A. If it does procedure B you do procedure B as per the oath to follow the liturgical rules. 


        This post shows to my mind two things. 1. history, which is also relevant to the days when not everyone could read. And increasingly, functional illiterates are graduated from high school, so it may be someday in a future cultural full collapse that the Reader may again become extremely important. It might well be someday that the priest is a man of wisdom and teaching ability, wisdom, and greatly understanding the Scriptures he has studied by listening to for years, but is himself illiterate. 2.  the comment about servile role strikes me as partaking of pride or vainglory as motive, not to be harsh just to use the right phrase. It is probably a very minor element present. 


        Justina



        ---In orthodox-readers@yahoogroups.com, <sustain_ability@...> wrote:

        Christ is Risen!
        On an unrelated note, our priest is retiring this Aug. 31. If anyone
        knows of a priest seeking employment, please let me know offlist. Our
        bishop could use some help in this matter.


        On Wed, Jun 5, 2013, at 02:45 PM, polychrony wrote:


        The message was that the Reader is one of honor, propriety, and
        leadership; and, regrettably has been denigrated (largely, I was say,
        the fault of the higher clergy). Rationales such as "I don't have
        anyone who can read!" is itself indicting.

        --
        http://www.fastmail.fm - Accessible with your email software
        or over the web



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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