Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [orthodox-readers] How to Read

Expand Messages
  • Philip Silouan Thompson
    At the monastery we were taught to read mostly on a single note, with minor variations as needed. But daily services began every morning at 2:30am, so the
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 1, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      At the monastery we were taught to read mostly on a single note, with
      minor variations as needed.

      But daily services began every morning at 2:30am, so the superior would
      remind us from time to time that all the brothers are struggling to stay
      awake in the services - so read with enough clarity and assertiveness
      that you *help* them in that struggle, not hinder them and put them to
      sleep.

      So I got in the habit of enunciating and reading with energy and
      intention, with the goal that the brother in the back stall would be
      able to understand and consciously agree with the prayers of the hours
      or whatever. A rapid-fire auctioneer voice or a dreary trudge through
      the Psalms will equally send the sleepy hearer's attention wandering.

      Rdr Silouan
    • Dcalvert
      Dear Rdr. John, Great article...thank you. I can tell you what I do...I take the text, and copy it into Word. Then, I edit the passage so that I will read it
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 17, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear Rdr. John,

        Great article...thank you.

        I can tell you what I do...I take the text, and copy it into Word. Then, I edit the passage so that I will read it in a way that makes sense....add breath spaces (...), add commas, semi colons, or even periods when necessary. Even EMPHASIS on the important words (and bold them).

        As that article you just referred us to indicates...the words are easy, but the syntax is tortured (my words, not the article). That has always been my problem reading the Epistles, even before I had to read them aloud.

        My only way of compensating is using my word processing program to edit it.

        Not sure that's what we're supposed to do...but no one seems to complain - and it makes things easier.

        Best Regards,
        Dean

        PS Having grown up in the Greek Church (now in the OCA), I can definitely understand their reluctance to do it in English...their mistakes passed un-noticed. LOL



        --- In orthodox-readers@yahoogroups.com, "John M. Black" <johnmblack@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Dn. Michael,
        >
        > As with so many things, you are bound to find multiple, and sometimes
        > conflicting, opinions.
        >
        > In my opinion, very often reading has become too mingled with the desire for
        > this or that "aesthetic", with many readers spending too much effort trying
        > to reproduce a specific style of reading from a specific time/place in
        > history, instead of simply giving the text proper emphasis within the
        > natural voice and letting the nuances of the text dictate the pitch.
        >
        > I would remind Joseph, and also your director, that the ultimate goal of
        > reading is for the faithful to hear and understand the words, and not be
        > distracted from the words by the reader's talents or personal affects. If
        > we simply follow that basic premise, a lot of the details of how to read
        > will work themselves out.
        >
        > There is a good article written by Fr. Sergius Halvorsen at
        > http://www.orthodoxpsalm.org/resources.html .
        >
        > -Rdr John Black
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > On Tue, Dec 1, 2009 at 1:51 PM, deaconmichael48 <Photo@...>wrote:
        >
        > > The issue has arisen in my parish about Reading. Our choir director reads
        > > at an extremely fast rate and, frankly, I can't understand him because he
        > > goes too fast.
        > >
        > > Joseph reads at a much slower rate, but we can understand him. The only
        > > problem is that he tends to emphasize the end of sentences. Recently our
        > > choir director told him to ignore commas and periods. I disagree. They are
        > > there for a purpose.
        > >
        > > Is there any written guidelines which I can cite?
        > >
        > > Thank you.
        > >
        > > Deacon Michael
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > To learn more about reader services, see:
        > > http://pages.prodigy.net/frjohnwhiteford/horologion.htm
        > >
        > > To access this lists archives, go to:
        > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orthodox-readers
        > > ogion.htm <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orthodox-readers%0Aogion.htm>
        > >
        > > To access this lists archives, go to:
        > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orthodox-readers
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.