Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [of] Calming Heated Threads

Expand Messages
  • David Flores
    This is a difficult situation. I ve found that there tend to be people who just wait for these discussions so that they can spew and stir the pot. My
    Message 1 of 16 , Jun 26, 2008
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      This is a difficult situation. I've found that there tend to be people who just wait for these discussions so that they can spew and stir the pot. My suggestions are that whenever possible, you post messages stating your position.

      Also, if your software doesn't include it, there should be a way for users to flag offensive content to you easily.

      Be as transparent as possible in your banning of users.

      Do not engage in any of the comments about your actions.

      Recognize good behavior and recruit allies on the forum. Ask them if they wouldn't mind letting you know if they see something brewing.

      If you haven't done so already, post this question over on the emint group, they have a lot of people there with great experience in this field.

      Best,

      David Flores




      --- On Thu, 6/26/08, Katherine Kornas <kkornas@...> wrote:
      From: Katherine Kornas <kkornas@...>
      Subject: [of] Calming Heated Threads
      To: onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Thursday, June 26, 2008, 2:08 PM











      I'm looking for advice on best ways to calm heated discussion threads. The

      online community I work with often erupts into contentious

      conversation- for example, discussions about "diversity" (which inevitably

      become debates about homosexuality) , politics and immigration.



      When the convictions start flying, what's the best way to keep everyone in

      line without being accused of censorship?



      We don't tolerate racist, homophobic, ageist, obscene, etc. language, and

      have, in the past, had to ban members or disable posts for repeatedly

      stepping over this line. We've tried jumping into threads as moderators to

      bring the discussion back to its original intentions, only to receive

      challenging comments in reply from the original offenders.



      What has worked for you?



      ...



      Katherine Kornas



      Community Product Manager



      GreatSchools



      415-977-0700 x 130



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • stanford@nwprocessworks.net
      Katherine hi, Sounds like a tough scene. Jumping in as a moderator is hard to do in a heated moment. It might help if the group were, in a quiet moment, to
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 26, 2008
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        Katherine hi,



        Sounds like a tough scene. Jumping in as a moderator is hard to do in a
        heated moment. It might help if the group were, in a quiet moment, to work
        on its vision for the online community, it's openness to various styles of
        communication, and consider having designated moderator or facilitator.



        In one online community that I am active in we use the two terms in very
        specific ways. A moderator is the heavy who steps in to enforce previously
        agreed upon ground roles. A facilitator is someone who comes in to help
        process the feelings and communications styles in the current situation.



        Moderating requires a little consensus authority based on prior consent from
        the group. Facilitating these sorts of moment requires, often, an ability to
        stay awake to many different sides and to support what is trying to happen;
        which also means supporting the boundaries and protection of others by
        challenging some folks to change.



        One way to attempt to facilitate a hot scene is to frame what is happening
        in terms of the roles that are present and the ghost roles that aren't being
        said directly, while also stating that any framing can't be complete or
        perfect and asking others to help improve it. That way if someone feels the
        framing overlooks their own experience, they also will hopefully feel
        invited to bring it in. Something like,



        "WOW. This is a hot spot. So many strongly held views. Such strong
        polarities. Strong expression of feelings. One role says gays are bad and
        another says homophobia is not the best. Some people have expressed
        previously that they don't like these eruptions in this online community.
        Others may feel censored Where should we go from here? Can we agree to
        continue for a certain number of days? Should we ask those who are
        interested to continue this thread in another space, maybe we create
        onlinefacilitation_room1@yahoogroups.com? Or maybe we as a community are at
        an edge to go more deeply in to our views together? The world hasn't solved
        these problems and maybe we can't either, but maybe we need to work on this
        together. Maybe we need this heated style of communications to build a
        stronger community. Where should we go?"



        Love to hear how it all works out, whatever you do.

        Good luck,



        Stanford

















        From: onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Katherine Kornas
        Sent: Thursday, June 26, 2008 11:08 AM
        To: onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [of] Calming Heated Threads



        I'm looking for advice on best ways to calm heated discussion threads. The
        online community I work with often erupts into contentious
        conversation-for example, discussions about "diversity" (which inevitably
        become debates about homosexuality), politics and immigration.

        When the convictions start flying, what's the best way to keep everyone in
        line without being accused of censorship?

        We don't tolerate racist, homophobic, ageist, obscene, etc. language, and
        have, in the past, had to ban members or disable posts for repeatedly
        stepping over this line. We've tried jumping into threads as moderators to
        bring the discussion back to its original intentions, only to receive
        challenging comments in reply from the original offenders.

        What has worked for you?

        ...

        Katherine Kornas

        Community Product Manager

        GreatSchools

        415-977-0700 x 130

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Zbigniew Lukasiak
        Hi, This is an idea that I ve already posted here some time ago - unfortunately I had no opportunity to test it. But in general it is an explication, a
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 26, 2008
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi,

          This is an idea that I've already posted here some time ago -
          unfortunately I had no opportunity to test it. But in general it is
          an explication, a variation over the, mentioned above, advice to:

          5.) Be willing to give them a time-out by shutting down a particular
          topic or board with an adequate post that says something along the lines of:

          Sometimes I wish that there was a maximum *rate* of emails per
          participant - for example one per day. This would break the vicious
          circle of more and more emotional responses - because the participants
          will have a full day to think it over and cool down. But I see it
          also as more democratic - it means everyone can have an equal voice in
          the discussion independently of how much time he can sacrifice for
          refreshing the mailbox.

          Cheers,
          Zbigniew

          On Thu, Jun 26, 2008 at 8:08 PM, Katherine Kornas
          <kkornas@...> wrote:
          > I'm looking for advice on best ways to calm heated discussion threads. The
          > online community I work with often erupts into contentious
          > conversation-for example, discussions about "diversity" (which inevitably
          > become debates about homosexuality), politics and immigration.
          >
          >
          >
          > When the convictions start flying, what's the best way to keep everyone in
          > line without being accused of censorship?
          >
          >
          >
          > We don't tolerate racist, homophobic, ageist, obscene, etc. language, and
          > have, in the past, had to ban members or disable posts for repeatedly
          > stepping over this line. We've tried jumping into threads as moderators to
          > bring the discussion back to its original intentions, only to receive
          > challenging comments in reply from the original offenders.
          >
          >
          >
          > What has worked for you?
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ...
          >
          > Katherine Kornas
          >
          > Community Product Manager
          >
          > GreatSchools
          >
          > 415-977-0700 x 130
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > to unsubscribe: <mailto:onlinefacilitation-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com>
          >
          > http://www.fullcirc.com/community/communitymanual.htm
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >



          --
          Zbigniew Lukasiak
          http://brudnopis.blogspot.com/
          http://perlalchemy.blogspot.com/
        • Cornejo Castro, Miguel
          Hi, I agree with David. Soft options are basic. I think most of the usual tried-and-true methods have been mentioned already. Here s our tack (which won t
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 27, 2008
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi,

            I agree with David. "Soft" options are basic.

            I think most of the usual tried-and-true methods have been mentioned already. Here's our tack (which won't get you loved by extremists but might give you a good debating athmosphere):

            - State the principle that everyone's views are respectable, and nobody has a right to insult him/her for them, or to quell or kick them out for their opinions. You can limit that (it's hard to respect some views in practice) but it is a very practical starting point... and a principle I like.

            - State the "respect the topic" principle too: steering a topic beyond the author's intentions, into a favourite fighting ground, can become hijacking and deprive the community of a good conversation.

            - Set the ring: what is banned, what is allowed. You may or may not ban insulting language, ad hominem attacks, etcetera... and you need to have a sensitive eye, because the limit between strong language and abuse is not always clear.

            - Take part in the conversations (as already reccomended). If you're not a part of the group, you have less moral authority and less knowledge of what is happening.

            - Use back channel (private message to quarrellers) to give fair, kind and early warning. Usually a suggestion to edit a specific offensive text can work wonders.

            - Enforce the principles. Effective tacks are:
            1. If you are using a forum, you can prune out a parasitic brawl (select and separate the hijacking messages) and set it apart form the conversation topic. What you do with the brawl afterwards if up to your community uses :-), some would close it, some would put it into a "no-holds-barred area", some would just let it roll on in the middle of the place. Pruning sends a very strong message and can be very effective.
            2. "Warnings" or timeouts for specific members. In a good forum you can usually put a specific member on "moderation queue", meaning that every message needs to be approved by a moderator before appearing. This needs to be done with a backchannel explanation.
            3. Topic lockdowns. When a topic becomes an ideological brawl with all sorts of undesirable behaviour, locking it down for good makes it plain that they've ruined the conversation for all. It's an extreme measure but it shows you're serious. Better warn ahead, too (kind of "If we can't deal with this issue like adults, respecting each other and their views, then we probably should not be debating this topic at all. Can't we tone things down a bit?)".
            4. Ban when needed. Don't let anybody abuse your rules by continuously treading on the edge of abuse. Don't tolerate systematic abusers. Don't allow favourite bullies (even if they share your views). Look out for "lynching mobs" of self-appointed censors, and find the instigators (usually very small cores). Be decisive... and be ready to acknowledge and correct your mistakes when you make them.
            5. Take moderation decisions out of the discussion. Public accusations of "censorship" or arbitrariness can get shrill. But if you establish -and stick to- a back-channel policy for objections and corrections to your decisions, you will get a more level-headed conversation that can often result in better understanding and a correction of the decision - or the behaviour.
            6. Be aware that you will take flak. If you interfere in a brawl, you're the next one they'll be trying to punch. You can't play Ms Nice to everyone and stop the bullying wars at the same time. Each side will accuse you of favouring the other. And sometimes, if the brawlers are many and intense, in the short term, you may find yourself abused beyond your emotional limits. That is no joke or exaggeration: reining in abusers takes a lot of emotional energy, so your facilitators may need a good dose of emotional support for the team and from the community at large, or burn out.

            It all gets down to setting clear rules for the debate and enforcing them. The rules need to be sensible and support your community's goals (and gather general agreement), the enforcement needs to be consistent and fast; I think the details of both can be as varied as the communities: you can have all sorts of environments, from Oxford don's club to non-holds-barred, from ideological to agnostic, and that's all right when that's what the community wants and not what some serial brawlers impose. Time and example eventually do the rest of the work, until the community's culture comes to recognize and reject inadequate debating behaviour... and the facilitator can relax a bit.

            In the end, though, this can amount to a lot of facilitator work. Banning some subject outright can be more time-effective when resources are scarce. I confess we do a bit of both strategies.

            Hope it helps. Best regards,

            Miguel

            ________________________________
            De: onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com [mailto:onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com] En nombre de Zbigniew Lukasiak
            Enviado el: viernes, 27 de junio de 2008 8:59
            Para: onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com
            Asunto: Re: [of] Calming Heated Threads


            Hi,

            This is an idea that I've already posted here some time ago -
            unfortunately I had no opportunity to test it. But in general it is
            an explication, a variation over the, mentioned above, advice to:

            5.) Be willing to give them a time-out by shutting down a particular
            topic or board with an adequate post that says something along the lines of:

            Sometimes I wish that there was a maximum *rate* of emails per
            participant - for example one per day. This would break the vicious
            circle of more and more emotional responses - because the participants
            will have a full day to think it over and cool down. But I see it
            also as more democratic - it means everyone can have an equal voice in
            the discussion independently of how much time he can sacrifice for
            refreshing the mailbox.

            Cheers,
            Zbigniew

            On Thu, Jun 26, 2008 at 8:08 PM, Katherine Kornas
            <kkornas@...<mailto:kkornas%40greatschools.net>> wrote:
            > I'm looking for advice on best ways to calm heated discussion threads. The
            > online community I work with often erupts into contentious
            > conversation-for example, discussions about "diversity" (which inevitably
            > become debates about homosexuality), politics and immigration.
            >
            >
            >
            > When the convictions start flying, what's the best way to keep everyone in
            > line without being accused of censorship?
            >
            >
            >
            > We don't tolerate racist, homophobic, ageist, obscene, etc. language, and
            > have, in the past, had to ban members or disable posts for repeatedly
            > stepping over this line. We've tried jumping into threads as moderators to
            > bring the discussion back to its original intentions, only to receive
            > challenging comments in reply from the original offenders.
            >
            >
            >
            > What has worked for you?
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ...
            >
            > Katherine Kornas
            >
            > Community Product Manager
            >
            > GreatSchools
            >
            > 415-977-0700 x 130
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > to unsubscribe: <mailto:onlinefacilitation-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com<mailto:onlinefacilitation-unsubscribe%40yahoogroups.com>>
            >
            > http://www.fullcirc.com/community/communitymanual.htm
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >

            --
            Zbigniew Lukasiak
            http://brudnopis.blogspot.com/
            http://perlalchemy.blogspot.com/
          • Scott Allen
            Some great advice so far. Allow me to toss in a couple more: I ve found a rew concepts really helpful in educating communities in a constructive way to prevent
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 27, 2008
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              Some great advice so far. Allow me to toss in a couple more:



              I've found a rew concepts really helpful in educating communities in a
              constructive way to prevent these situations:



              1. Presume good intent. If there are two or more ways you can
              interpret what the other person said, respond as if they meant the best
              possible one. It's a no-lose situation. Either:

              a. You misinterpreted their intention, in which case it keeps you from
              looking foolish.

              b. You interpreted it correctly, but by "unilaterally disarming", you
              give them a "gracious out" to back down.

              c. You interpreted it correctly, but by taking the high road, you
              force them to be the lone aggressor. That will help prevent escalation by
              others as well as be better for your own reputation (and karma).



              2. You are never backed into a corner online. Your reputation will
              never suffer because you took an hour or two longer to respond than you
              could have. Everyone knows that people have lives outside of these
              communities. If you read something that sets you off, don't respond
              immediately. Or write your response and save it as a draft - get it off your
              chest - but don't post it. Cool off first. Go do something that makes you
              happy. Better yet, sleep on it! Then come back and see how you feel about
              it. Again, it's a no-lose situation. This practice will always be better for
              you.



              3. Attacking a deeply-held belief IS attacking the person. One of the
              biggest fallacies of online facilitation is the idea that you should
              confront the idea instead of the person. It's great in concept, but in
              practice, it doesn't work very well. It's a cop-out. People will instead say
              things like "that's the stupidest idea I've heard". By simple logic, if the
              idea is stupid, anyone who believes it strongly - who isn't immediately
              swayed by the counter-arguments - is stupid also. Watch those heated threads
              with this in mind and see just how much passes as "attacking the idea" when
              it's really an ad hominem attack.



              4. Stick to the facts. No matter how deeply you believe something,
              there are degrees of "truthiness". I'll use the example Katherine first
              raised - these do NOT reflect my personal opinion. Consider:

              a. "Homosexuality is wrong."

              b. "The Bible says homosexuality is wrong."

              c. "The Bible says homosexuality is wrong. See Genesis 19, Jude 7 and
              Romans 1."

              d. "I believe homosexuality is wrong, based on my reading of Genesis
              19, Jude 7 and Romans 1."

              e. "I believe homosexuality is wrong, based on my reading of Genesis
              19, Jude 7 and Romans 1, but I recognize that others read those same
              passages differently."



              Big difference, right? Now instead of being a veiled personal attack on a
              gay member of the forum ("homosexuality is wrong" + "you are homosexual" ==
              "you are wrong/bad"), it's a statement of an opinion substantiated by fact.
              If the conversation takes place at the level of "X is right/wrong", we will
              never get anywhere - no common ground, no mutual respect, no agreeing to
              disagree. We have to move a little farther up the truthiness tree.



              Hope that helps - good luck!



              Scott Allen
              Connections


              512.215.9720

              When an email just won't do


              LinkedIn Profile <http://linkedin.com/in/scottallen>

              Get to know me, virtually


              Link to Your World <http://www.linktoyourworld.com/>

              The Relationship Economy is here, now


              The Virtual Handshake <http://thevirtualhandshake.com/>

              Opening doors and closing deals online


              About Entrepreneurs <http://entrepreneurs.about.com/>

              Free resources to start and grow your business







              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Katherine Kornas
              All, Thanks so much for these great suggestions! For those of you who have the ability to suspend posting-either on the member level or the thread level-do you
              Message 6 of 16 , Jul 1, 2008
              View Source
              • 0 Attachment
                All,



                Thanks so much for these great suggestions!



                For those of you who have the ability to suspend posting-either on the
                member level or the thread level-do you visibly note why privileges have
                been suspended? For example, "This thread has been temporarily shut down
                by a moderator," "We've temporarily suspended your posting privileges
                since three of your comments have been reported recently," etc.



                Katherine



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Cortney Sellers
                No. You can t do that for privacy sake. You can discuss actions with the affected parties only. Cortney From: onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com
                Message 7 of 16 , Jul 1, 2008
                View Source
                • 0 Attachment
                  No. You can't do that for privacy sake. You can discuss actions with the
                  affected parties only.



                  Cortney



                  From: onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com
                  [mailto:onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Katherine Kornas
                  Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 2:12 PM
                  To: onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [of] Calming Heated Threads



                  All,

                  Thanks so much for these great suggestions!

                  For those of you who have the ability to suspend posting-either on the
                  member level or the thread level-do you visibly note why privileges have
                  been suspended? For example, "This thread has been temporarily shut down
                  by a moderator," "We've temporarily suspended your posting privileges
                  since three of your comments have been reported recently," etc.

                  Katherine

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Cornejo Castro, Miguel
                  I sort of agree with Cortney. But... When we close a thread, we always leave a clean explanatory message in public. People have a right to know... and if they
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jul 2, 2008
                  View Source
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I sort of agree with Cortney. But...

                    When we close a thread, we always leave a clean explanatory message in public. People have a right to know... and if they don't, they act as if they did, so it's better to tell them what happened. It's a very good tool to signal you're serious about your policies. But it needs to be objective, cool and clear.

                    When we suspend a user, we always send him a backchannel message (internal messaging, never public) explaining the action, the time lapse, and the reasons (quotes from rulebook), and asking for any clarification that the user feels convenient. Saves lots of trouble. And as part of the suspension process, we always tag the user with a note in the "warning system" (just for facilitators' eyes) explaining why the action was taken, for future knowledge. That saves lots of trouble too.

                    Best regards,

                    Miguel


                    ________________________________________
                    De: onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com [onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com] En nombre de Katherine Kornas [kkornas@...]
                    Enviado el: martes, 01 de julio de 2008 21:12
                    Para: onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com
                    Asunto: RE: [of] Calming Heated Threads

                    All,

                    Thanks so much for these great suggestions!

                    For those of you who have the ability to suspend posting-either on the
                    member level or the thread level-do you visibly note why privileges have
                    been suspended? For example, "This thread has been temporarily shut down
                    by a moderator," "We've temporarily suspended your posting privileges
                    since three of your comments have been reported recently," etc.

                    Katherine

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Nancy White
                    There has been great discussions in this thread. Katherine, do you think when it finally wraps up, you would be willing to summarize the thread and then post
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jul 2, 2008
                    View Source
                    • 0 Attachment
                      There has been great discussions in this thread. Katherine, do you
                      think when it finally wraps up, you would be willing to summarize the
                      thread and then post it on our wiki at
                      http://onlinefacilitation.wikispaces.com

                      I have started a page for it here
                      http://onlinefacilitation.wikispaces.com/Calming+Threads+of+Conflict+in+Online+Forums

                      N

                      t 08:42 AM 6/27/2008, you wrote:
                      >I'm looking for advice on best ways to calm heated discussion threads. The
                      >online community I work with often erupts into contentious
                      >conversation-for example, discussions about "diversity" (which inevitably
                      >become debates about homosexuality), politics and immigration.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >When the convictions start flying, what's the best way to keep everyone in
                      >line without being accused of censorship?
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >We don't tolerate racist, homophobic, ageist, obscene, etc. language, and
                      >have, in the past, had to ban members or disable posts for repeatedly
                      >stepping over this line. We've tried jumping into threads as moderators to
                      >bring the discussion back to its original intentions, only to receive
                      >challenging comments in reply from the original offenders.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >What has worked for you?
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >...
                      >
                      >Katherine Kornas
                      >
                      >Community Product Manager
                      >
                      >GreatSchools
                      >
                      >415-977-0700 x 130
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >------------------------------------
                      >
                      >to unsubscribe: <mailto:onlinefacilitation-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com>
                      >
                      >http://www.fullcirc.com/community/communitymanual.htm
                      >Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >

                      Nancy White | Full Circle Associates | Connecting communities online
                      nancyw@... | +1 206 517 4754 | GMT - 8 |skype - choconancy |
                      Twitter NancyWhite
                      http://www.fullcirc.com/


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Cornejo Castro, Miguel
                      Good idea. I d also like to ask the different authors for permission to reproduce the thread on my blog, if I find the time. If anybody objects, please let me
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jul 3, 2008
                      View Source
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Good idea.

                        I'd also like to ask the different authors for permission to reproduce the thread on my blog, if I find the time.

                        If anybody objects, please let me know :-): Best regards,

                        Miguel

                        ________________________________
                        De: onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com [mailto:onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com] En nombre de Nancy White
                        Enviado el: miércoles, 02 de julio de 2008 18:54
                        Para: onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com
                        Asunto: Re: [of] Calming Heated Threads


                        There has been great discussions in this thread. Katherine, do you
                        think when it finally wraps up, you would be willing to summarize the
                        thread and then post it on our wiki at
                        http://onlinefacilitation.wikispaces.com

                        I have started a page for it here
                        http://onlinefacilitation.wikispaces.com/Calming+Threads+of+Conflict+in+Online+Forums

                        N

                        t 08:42 AM 6/27/2008, you wrote:
                        >I'm looking for advice on best ways to calm heated discussion threads. The
                        >online community I work with often erupts into contentious
                        >conversation-for example, discussions about "diversity" (which inevitably
                        >become debates about homosexuality), politics and immigration.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >When the convictions start flying, what's the best way to keep everyone in
                        >line without being accused of censorship?
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >We don't tolerate racist, homophobic, ageist, obscene, etc. language, and
                        >have, in the past, had to ban members or disable posts for repeatedly
                        >stepping over this line. We've tried jumping into threads as moderators to
                        >bring the discussion back to its original intentions, only to receive
                        >challenging comments in reply from the original offenders.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >What has worked for you?
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >...
                        >
                        >Katherine Kornas
                        >
                        >Community Product Manager
                        >
                        >GreatSchools
                        >
                        >415-977-0700 x 130
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >------------------------------------
                        >
                        >to unsubscribe: <mailto:onlinefacilitation-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com<mailto:onlinefacilitation-unsubscribe%40yahoogroups.com>>
                        >
                        >http://www.fullcirc.com/community/communitymanual.htm
                        >Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >

                        Nancy White | Full Circle Associates | Connecting communities online
                        nancyw@...<mailto:nancyw%40fullcirc.com> | +1 206 517 4754 | GMT - 8 |skype - choconancy |
                        Twitter NancyWhite
                        http://www.fullcirc.com/

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Nancy White
                        Well, I see the summary is on the wiki! YAY and I presume, a thank you to Katherine! N ... Nancy White | Full Circle Associates | Connecting communities online
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jul 9, 2008
                        View Source
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Well, I see the summary is on the wiki! YAY and I
                          presume, a thank you to Katherine!

                          N

                          At 01:41 AM 7/3/2008, you wrote:
                          >Good idea.
                          >
                          >I'd also like to ask the different authors for
                          >permission to reproduce the thread on my blog, if I find the time.
                          >
                          >If anybody objects, please let me know :-): Best regards,
                          >
                          >Miguel
                          >
                          >________________________________
                          >De: onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com
                          >[mailto:onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com] En nombre de Nancy White
                          >Enviado el: miércoles, 02 de julio de 2008 18:54
                          >Para: onlinefacilitation@yahoogroups.com
                          >Asunto: Re: [of] Calming Heated Threads
                          >
                          >
                          >There has been great discussions in this thread. Katherine, do you
                          >think when it finally wraps up, you would be willing to summarize the
                          >thread and then post it on our wiki at
                          >http://onlinefacilitation.wikispaces.com
                          >
                          >I have started a page for it here
                          >http://onlinefacilitation.wikispaces.com/Calming+Threads+of+Conflict+in+Online+Forums
                          >
                          >N
                          >
                          >t 08:42 AM 6/27/2008, you wrote:
                          > >I'm looking for advice on best ways to calm heated discussion threads. The
                          > >online community I work with often erupts into contentious
                          > >conversation-for example, discussions about "diversity" (which inevitably
                          > >become debates about homosexuality), politics and immigration.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >When the convictions start flying, what's the best way to keep everyone in
                          > >line without being accused of censorship?
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >We don't tolerate racist, homophobic, ageist, obscene, etc. language, and
                          > >have, in the past, had to ban members or disable posts for repeatedly
                          > >stepping over this line. We've tried jumping into threads as moderators to
                          > >bring the discussion back to its original intentions, only to receive
                          > >challenging comments in reply from the original offenders.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >What has worked for you?
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >...
                          > >
                          > >Katherine Kornas
                          > >
                          > >Community Product Manager
                          > >
                          > >GreatSchools
                          > >
                          > >415-977-0700 x 130
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >------------------------------------
                          > >
                          > >to unsubscribe:
                          > <mailto:onlinefacilitation-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com<mailto:onlinefacilitation-unsubscribe%40yahoogroups.com>>
                          > >
                          > >http://www.fullcirc.com/community/communitymanual.htm
                          > >Yahoo! Groups Links
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                          >Nancy White | Full Circle Associates | Connecting communities online
                          >nancyw@...<mailto:nancyw%40fullcirc.com>
                          >| +1 206 517 4754 | GMT - 8 |skype - choconancy |
                          >Twitter NancyWhite
                          >http://www.fullcirc.com/
                          >
                          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                          >------------------------------------
                          >
                          >to unsubscribe: <mailto:onlinefacilitation-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com>
                          >
                          >http://www.fullcirc.com/community/communitymanual.htm
                          >Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >

                          Nancy White | Full Circle Associates | Connecting communities online
                          nancyw@... | +1 206 517 4754 | GMT - 8
                          |skype - choconancy | Twitter NancyWhite
                          http://www.fullcirc.com/


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • John Harvey
                          In her + Culture Blog , Erin Potts of be+cause strategies quotes Clive article in this month s Wired
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jul 22, 2008
                          View Source
                          • 0 Attachment
                            In her + Culture Blog
                            <http://www.becausestrategies.com/cultureblog/index.php>, Erin Potts of
                            be+cause strategies quotes Clive article in this month's Wired Magazine:

                            "On the Web, the best way to solve a problem is to engage an extensive
                            network; the person who provides information, advice, or answers is
                            often someone you know only vaguely — a weak link.

                            "In the face-to-face world, though..., groups are more productive when
                            the team members know each other well, sharing extremely strong links.
                            That's because face-to-face teamwork requires intimacy, he says, and
                            "when you're among friends you can really capitalize on preexisting
                            protocols" — nods, grunts, in-jokes — for talking and listening."

                            Appearantly, the reasearchers at MIT are focused on the differences.

                            John Harvey, Wizened Web Wizard Wannabe
                            “The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of
                            thinking we were at when we created them.” -Albert Einstein
                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.