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An "antidote" for mild onion/garlic allergy; and this allergy in dogs

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  • radioroe
    An antidote I have taken for years for digestive problems associated with onions, garlic, shallots, and chives is Papaya Enzyme tablets, which has in its
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 23, 2009
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      An "antidote" I have taken for years for digestive problems associated with onions, garlic, shallots, and chives is Papaya Enzyme tablets, which has in its contents 45 mg Papain as its main ingredient. I do not buy the variety which has pineapple added, as they reduce the papain. Papaya is the Hawaiian fruit. Dried papaya is available in stores but it does not work as well for me.

      My allergy level I describe to people as "mild 2 day flu symptoms" with headache, fatigue, acid stomach, and intestinal issues. I am not affected by odor. Thankfully, I do not get hives or breathing problems, like some of you do.

      The specific treatment I use successfully is 1 tablet of American Health Co Chewable Original Papaya Enzyme with each slice of pizza; or 2 tablets with a meal contained some onion powder in the gravy, or 3 tablets if I accidentally eat food containing chunks of onion or garlic. I am retired so have no financial interest in this company. It is hard to find in stores, so for the past few years I buy it on the internet. It is fairly cheap, a few dollars for a a bottle of 100.

      I tried many other things, like baking soda in water (not a good idea because of the sodium), Rolaids, trial and error on and on, and it has been so long ago I do not remember how I arrived at using papaya. I am not a vitamin nut, nor a homeopathic believer, this is simply something that works for me.

      The symptoms started at age 22 after I ate a couple fried onion rings with a meal so I was able to associate the reaction. And now I am a senior, but it has not worsened, nor improved.

      It is great to find this group, which I did not know existed until I did a Yahoo search this morning after reading an article about dog care (yes, a vet) warning to never feed a pet any onion or garlic because dogs and cats lack the enzyme to digest it. And the culprit ingredient is thiosulfate. I was searching for that. WOW! Now I can tell people there is a support group.

      Friends, relatives, and waiters always give me an odd look when I query them about the presence in those items in foods. I suspect they think it is "in my head" and that I am a picky eater. They have never heard of an onion/garlic allergy. My wife's sister married an Italian so you can imagine my visits there that include dinner.

      Yes, I do pick at food and have become an expert at spotting tiny bits of onion in foods. And in sniffing for garlic. When buying canned or frozen goods, I read the labels and then select, for example, tomato sauce for spaghetti that does not have onion added. I substitute Tabasco sauce for onion powder in spaghetti.

      At restaurants, I can tolerate a little onion powder or garlic powder, but no chunks (whether or not cooked). I have found onions/shallots/chives in weird food combinations, like in a crab sandwich, so I always have to ask, other than chocolate cake (so far that is safe). I have figured out which restaurants to avoid, as they put this "evil stuff" in almost everything on their menu. Some waiters apparently do not know that chives are made from onions.

      Eating out is kind of frustrating to me, as I have to scan the entire menu to guess at which 2 or 3 offerings are edible. For lunch, I often order a BLT to ease the frustration of menu-searching.

      I try to set people at ease by saying, it could be worse, I could be allergic to chocolate or ice cream.
    • Don Yodis
      This is not an antidote either but I ve found that resveratrol significantly decreases my symptoms when taken daily and after having gotten onions accidently.
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 23, 2009
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        This is not an antidote either but I've found that resveratrol significantly decreases my symptoms when taken daily and after having gotten onions accidently.  My symptoms are also "flu-like" though not at all mild and they have put me into shock and into the hospital.  I'm just thankful it is not like a peanut allergy with immediate anaphylactic shock!!
         
        I take 300mg of resveratrol twice daily (morning and before bed).  If I get a dose of onions in something (and yes I ask ALL kinds of questions first!) then I take an extra 1,000mg.  It does not eliminate the symptoms but has lessened the impact of the symptoms ... enough so that I can now tolerate ketchup on a burger where that was an absolute NO before.
         
        Don

        On Mon, Mar 23, 2009 at 10:00 AM, radioroe <radioroe@...> wrote:

        An "antidote" I have taken for years for digestive problems associated with onions, garlic, shallots, and chives is Papaya Enzyme tablets, which has in its contents 45 mg Papain as its main ingredient. I do not buy the variety which has pineapple added, as they reduce the papain. Papaya is the Hawaiian fruit. Dried papaya is available in stores but it does not work as well for me.

        My allergy level I describe to people as "mild 2 day flu symptoms" with headache, fatigue, acid stomach, and intestinal issues. I am not affected by odor. Thankfully, I do not get hives or breathing problems, like some of you do.

        The specific treatment I use successfully is 1 tablet of American Health Co Chewable Original Papaya Enzyme with each slice of pizza; or 2 tablets with a meal contained some onion powder in the gravy, or 3 tablets if I accidentally eat food containing chunks of onion or garlic. I am retired so have no financial interest in this company. It is hard to find in stores, so for the past few years I buy it on the internet. It is fairly cheap, a few dollars for a a bottle of 100.

        I tried many other things, like baking soda in water (not a good idea because of the sodium), Rolaids, trial and error on and on, and it has been so long ago I do not remember how I arrived at using papaya. I am not a vitamin nut, nor a homeopathic believer, this is simply something that works for me.

        The symptoms started at age 22 after I ate a couple fried onion rings with a meal so I was able to associate the reaction. And now I am a senior, but it has not worsened, nor improved.

        It is great to find this group, which I did not know existed until I did a Yahoo search this morning after reading an article about dog care (yes, a vet) warning to never feed a pet any onion or garlic because dogs and cats lack the enzyme to digest it. And the culprit ingredient is thiosulfate. I was searching for that. WOW! Now I can tell people there is a support group.

        Friends, relatives, and waiters always give me an odd look when I query them about the presence in those items in foods. I suspect they think it is "in my head" and that I am a picky eater. They have never heard of an onion/garlic allergy. My wife's sister married an Italian so you can imagine my visits there that include dinner.

        Yes, I do pick at food and have become an expert at spotting tiny bits of onion in foods. And in sniffing for garlic. When buying canned or frozen goods, I read the labels and then select, for example, tomato sauce for spaghetti that does not have onion added. I substitute Tabasco sauce for onion powder in spaghetti.

        At restaurants, I can tolerate a little onion powder or garlic powder, but no chunks (whether or not cooked). I have found onions/shallots/chives in weird food combinations, like in a crab sandwich, so I always have to ask, other than chocolate cake (so far that is safe). I have figured out which restaurants to avoid, as they put this "evil stuff" in almost everything on their menu. Some waiters apparently do not know that chives are made from onions.

        Eating out is kind of frustrating to me, as I have to scan the entire menu to guess at which 2 or 3 offerings are edible. For lunch, I often order a BLT to ease the frustration of menu-searching.

        I try to set people at ease by saying, it could be worse, I could be allergic to chocolate or ice cream.


      • Di [dimntd] :o)
        I take a multi-enzyme supplement when I eat and/or take meds. It has no effect on my allergies though. I am allergic to casein(milk), chocolate and sugar. It
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 23, 2009
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          I take a multi-enzyme supplement when I eat and/or take meds. It
          has no effect on my allergies though. I am allergic to
          casein(milk), chocolate and sugar. It is survivable, lol.

          Any questions ask, I'm not shy.

          Take care of you, you're important to me.

          Big gentle huggles,
          Di (Dimntd) in Feasterville-Trevose, PA, USA :o)
          Email me if you'd like the link to my blog or web page.

          Be the person your pets think you are.


          radioroe wrote:
          An "antidote" I have taken for years for digestive problems
          associated with onions, garlic, shallots, and chives is Papaya
          Enzyme tablets, which has in its contents 45 mg Papain as its
          main ingredient. I do not buy the variety which has pineapple
          added, as they reduce the papain. Papaya is the Hawaiian
          fruit. Dried papaya is available in stores but it does not
          work as well for me.

          My allergy level I describe to people as "mild 2 day flu
          symptoms" with headache, fatigue, acid stomach, and intestinal
          issues. I am not affected by odor. Thankfully, I do not get
          hives or breathing problems, like some of you do.

          The specific treatment I use successfully is 1 tablet of
          American Health Co Chewable Original Papaya Enzyme with each
          slice of pizza; or 2 tablets with a meal contained some onion
          powder in the gravy, or 3 tablets if I accidentally eat food
          containing chunks of onion or garlic. I am retired so have no
          financial interest in this company. It is hard to find in
          stores, so for the past few years I buy it on the internet. It
          is fairly cheap, a few dollars for a a bottle of 100.

          I tried many other things, like baking soda in water (not a
          good idea because of the sodium), Rolaids, trial and error on
          and on, and it has been so long ago I do not remember how I
          arrived at using papaya. I am not a vitamin nut, nor a
          homeopathic believer, this is simply something that works for
          me.

          The symptoms started at age 22 after I ate a couple fried
          onion rings with a meal so I was able to associate the
          reaction. And now I am a senior, but it has not worsened, nor
          improved.

          It is great to find this group, which I did not know existed
          until I did a Yahoo search this morning after reading an
          article about dog care (yes, a vet) warning to never feed a
          pet any onion or garlic because dogs and cats lack the enzyme
          to digest it. And the culprit ingredient is thiosulfate. I was
          searching for that. WOW! Now I can tell people there is a
          support group.

          Friends, relatives, and waiters always give me an odd look
          when I query them about the presence in those items in foods.
          I suspect they think it is "in my head" and that I am a picky
          eater. They have never heard of an onion/garlic allergy. My
          wife's sister married an Italian so you can imagine my visits
          there that include dinner.

          Yes, I do pick at food and have become an expert at spotting
          tiny bits of onion in foods. And in sniffing for garlic. When
          buying canned or frozen goods, I read the labels and then
          select, for example, tomato sauce for spaghetti that does not
          have onion added. I substitute Tabasco sauce for onion powder
          in spaghetti.

          At restaurants, I can tolerate a little onion powder or garlic
          powder, but no chunks (whether or not cooked). I have found
          onions/shallots/chives in weird food combinations, like in a
          crab sandwich, so I always have to ask, other than chocolate
          cake (so far that is safe). I have figured out which
          restaurants to avoid, as they put this "evil stuff" in almost
          everything on their menu. Some waiters apparently do not know
          that chives are made from onions.

          Eating out is kind of frustrating to me, as I have to scan the
          entire menu to guess at which 2 or 3 offerings are edible.
          For lunch, I often order a BLT to ease the frustration of
          menu-searching.

          I try to set people at ease by saying, it could be worse, I
          could be allergic to chocolate or ice cream.
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