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  • ezguine
    Greetings group. Just joined your group. Been looking to build a ply-on-frame one sheeter that s easy to build, lite in weight to move around easily and also
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 2, 2009
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      Greetings group. Just joined your group.
      Been looking to build a ply-on-frame one sheeter that's easy to build, lite in weight to move around easily and also that you could actually fish in without swamping.
      The 1 sheet skiffs look like nice little boats, but only for gently rowing. They seem to me that the side-to-side rocking action from casting out or trying to land a fish onto the boat to much water would come in. Not enough freeboard.
      Does anybody care to share some plans or links for a good frame-on-ply (No fiberglassing) cheapo 1/4" lauan that fits easily into the back of the truck for some flat water pond fishing?

      Thanks all

      EZguine
    • jbrotorua
      ... Hi Ken, welcome aboard. Considering your requirements you might find my new pram design idea might be what your looking for. It can be made with chine or
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 2, 2009
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        --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, "ezguine" <ken.nesbitt@...> wrote:

        Hi Ken, welcome aboard. Considering your requirements you might find my new pram design idea might be what your looking for. It can be made with chine or stitch and glue cheap and fast. It`s like Shamrock but more punt/pram like, holds max displacement for a one sheeter, stable flat bottom with more room to move around in. Easily portable and light weight. I should have a photo or two at the end off the week, and a plan sketch.

        Cheers Phil.



        >
        > Greetings group. Just joined your group.
        > Been looking to build a ply-on-frame one sheeter that's easy to build, lite in weight to move around easily and also that you could actually fish in without swamping.
        > The 1 sheet skiffs look like nice little boats, but only for gently rowing. They seem to me that the side-to-side rocking action from casting out or trying to land a fish onto the boat to much water would come in. Not enough freeboard.
        > Does anybody care to share some plans or links for a good frame-on-ply (No fiberglassing) cheapo 1/4" lauan that fits easily into the back of the truck for some flat water pond fishing?
        >
        > Thanks all
        >
        > EZguine
        >
      • ezguine
        Looking forward to it. I really like the Shamrock design also. That is a nice looking boat EZguine
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 2, 2009
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          Looking forward to it. I really like the Shamrock design also. That is a nice looking boat

          EZguine

          --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, "jbrotorua" <cyrptsofalzaria@...> wrote:
          >
          > --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, "ezguine" <ken.nesbitt@> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Ken, welcome aboard. Considering your requirements you might find my new pram design idea might be what your looking for. It can be made with chine or stitch and glue cheap and fast. It`s like Shamrock but more punt/pram like, holds max displacement for a one sheeter, stable flat bottom with more room to move around in. Easily portable and light weight. I should have a photo or two at the end off the week, and a plan sketch.
          >
          > Cheers Phil.
          >
          >
          >
          > >
          > > Greetings group. Just joined your group.
          > > Been looking to build a ply-on-frame one sheeter that's easy to build, lite in weight to move around easily and also that you could actually fish in without swamping.
          > > The 1 sheet skiffs look like nice little boats, but only for gently rowing. They seem to me that the side-to-side rocking action from casting out or trying to land a fish onto the boat to much water would come in. Not enough freeboard.
          > > Does anybody care to share some plans or links for a good frame-on-ply (No fiberglassing) cheapo 1/4" lauan that fits easily into the back of the truck for some flat water pond fishing?
          > >
          > > Thanks all
          > >
          > > EZguine
          > >
          >
        • Thomas De Meijer
          For a collection to basically all the one sheet boats available, see http://www.tdem.co.nz/boat/links/one-sheet.html My collection took years to make!
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 3, 2009
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            For a collection to basically all the one sheet boats available, see http://www.tdem.co.nz/boat/links/one-sheet.html
            My collection took years to make!

            --- On Tue, 2/6/09, ezguine <ken.nesbitt@...> wrote:

            > From: ezguine <ken.nesbitt@...>
            > Subject: [onesheetwonders] Just joined
            > To: onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com
            > Received: Tuesday, 2 June, 2009, 6:53 PM
            > Greetings group.  Just joined
            > your group.
            > Been looking to build a ply-on-frame one sheeter that's
            > easy to build, lite in weight to move around easily and also
            > that you could actually fish in without swamping. 
            > The 1 sheet skiffs look like nice little boats, but only
            > for gently rowing.  They seem to me that the
            > side-to-side rocking action from casting out or trying to
            > land a fish onto the boat to much water would come in. Not
            > enough freeboard.
            > Does anybody care to share some plans or links for a good
            > frame-on-ply (No fiberglassing) cheapo 1/4" lauan that fits
            > easily into the back of the truck for some flat water pond
            > fishing?
            >
            > Thanks all
            >
            > EZguine
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >     mailto:onesheetwonders-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            >
          • jbrotorua
            ... Cheers, This file has been added to the Links section a while ago and remains there for anyone wanting more info.
            Message 5 of 11 , Jun 3, 2009
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              --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, Thomas De Meijer <tdemeijer@...> wrote:
              >
              Cheers, This file has been added to the Links section a while ago and remains there for anyone wanting more info.

              >
              > For a collection to basically all the one sheet boats available, see http://www.tdem.co.nz/boat/links/one-sheet.html
              > My collection took years to make!
              >
              > --- On Tue, 2/6/09, ezguine <ken.nesbitt@...> wrote:
              >
              > > From: ezguine <ken.nesbitt@...>
              > > Subject: [onesheetwonders] Just joined
              > > To: onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com
              > > Received: Tuesday, 2 June, 2009, 6:53 PM
              > > Greetings group.  Just joined
              > > your group.
              > > Been looking to build a ply-on-frame one sheeter that's
              > > easy to build, lite in weight to move around easily and also
              > > that you could actually fish in without swamping. 
              > > The 1 sheet skiffs look like nice little boats, but only
              > > for gently rowing.  They seem to me that the
              > > side-to-side rocking action from casting out or trying to
              > > land a fish onto the boat to much water would come in. Not
              > > enough freeboard.
              > > Does anybody care to share some plans or links for a good
              > > frame-on-ply (No fiberglassing) cheapo 1/4" lauan that fits
              > > easily into the back of the truck for some flat water pond
              > > fishing?
              > >
              > > Thanks all
              > >
              > > EZguine
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ------------------------------------
              > >
              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > >
              > >     mailto:onesheetwonders-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
            • woodislands
              The constraint of one sheet will make all designs a compromise with the things you ask for being just out of reach. I have struggled with 1 and 1 1/2 sheet
              Message 6 of 11 , Jun 4, 2009
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                The constraint of one sheet will make all designs a compromise with the things you ask for being just out of reach. I have struggled with 1 and 1 1/2 sheet designs and gotten nice, fairly easy to row results, but the stability is far less than with a big traditional rowboat. With a big boat you, the passenger, are a much smaller percentage of the toatl weight, so you can fling it around without much effect. When you are 70% of the total weight, it is a different story!
                The length is not the problem, but the 4' width forces a tradeoff between width and freeboard. If you make it narrow to get freeboard, your boat gets tippy, but if you make it too wide then little remains for sides and freeboard--you can't carry much and are at risk in chop (waves) and wind.
                My 1 1/2 sheet design was very tippy getting in and out. I have concluded a V bottom does not buy much. The major mistake was making the forward part narrower than the rear--the result is a boat that tips forward quite a bit when the rear passenger gets out.
                Somewhere I read a comment by another designer who pointed out that the square/round profile is almost irrelevant to stability. Instead it is getting the center of mass low, LOW. The only solution is to make the seat low relative to the width. Since the weight center is so critical front-to-back as well, if you plan to sometimes take one (or two) passengers, you need the flexibility of a front-to-rear straddle seat.
                Tom Schultz
                schultz@...
                > --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, Thomas De Meijer <tdemeijer@> wrote:
                > >
                > Cheers, This file has been added to the Links section a while ago and remains there for anyone wanting more info.
                >
                > > > From: ezguine <ken.nesbitt@>
                > > > Subject: [onesheetwonders] Just joined
                > > > To: onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com
                > > > Received: Tuesday, 2 June, 2009, 6:53 PM
                > > > Greetings group.  Just joined
                > > > your group.
                > > > Been looking to build a ply-on-frame one sheeter that's
                > > > easy to build, lite in weight to move around easily and also
                > > > that you could actually fish in without swamping. 
                > > > The 1 sheet skiffs look like nice little boats, but only
                > > > for gently rowing.  They seem to me that the
                > > > side-to-side rocking action from casting out or trying to
                > > > land a fish onto the boat to much water would come in. Not
                > > > enough freeboard.
                > > > Does anybody care to share some plans or links for a good
                > > > frame-on-ply (No fiberglassing) cheapo 1/4" lauan that fits
                > > > easily into the back of the truck for some flat water pond
                > > > fishing?
                > > >
                > > > Thanks all
                > > >
                > > > EZguine
              • jbrotorua
                ... Thanks Tom, your 100% on that I agree, all my designs have low seating than is designed to distribute the weight evenly along the length of the boat to get
                Message 7 of 11 , Jun 4, 2009
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                  --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, "woodislands" <schultz@...> wrote:

                  Thanks Tom, your 100% on that I agree, all my designs have low seating than is designed to distribute the weight evenly along the length of the boat to get away with the less width. For example on Boyak its all about the angle you lean back on a 45 degree and push your legs forward and flat to distribute the weight more evenly along the entire distance of the boat.
                  I don't put seats in some one sheeters because its up to the individuals weight and body type to find the comfort zone of where abouts to balance a lot like the canoe kayak type principles.
                  Also I use outdoor furniture water proof cushions as seats and adjust myself accordingly to the conditions if I have to keep low in the rougher conditions or if its calm I sit more up right.

                  As for the shape, round hull will roll more with the wave and v bottoms are more for speed and direction in power boats. My boats are all row and paddle and I find the flat bottom gives the best of both worlds in stability and ok speed for ease through water.
                  Ive got a preference for flat bottom square boats from my experiences in Boldger Payson designs ive built previously and comparing them to conventional factory mass produced hulls of all kind of shape and size. Ive found the boldger boats more often than not out performed the conventional shapes so im a biases to them for protected waters.

                  If I was going off shore then length and shape would be another consideration, but for me its all about the roller coaster ride hugging the shore line.
                  Ive owned big boats but find I get more fun out off my smaller designs.
                  Its like why go out on a big floating platform that gives you no excitement to the conditions, when personalty i like challenge of a wave and the fight off conditions and the occasional scare of capsize.
                  If your only a few meters from the shore line then its relatively low risk if you get thrown out. Although conditions do change and stretches of water can be more dangerous than expected suddenly, so you still need a safe design in a boat and a life jacket and not to take the whole 6 pack with you. It`s winter here in New Zealand and im wishing it was summer again, so im hibernating in the shed and getting my boats spruced up for summer.

                  Cheers Phil.



                  >
                  > The constraint of one sheet will make all designs a compromise with the things you ask for being just out of reach. I have struggled with 1 and 1 1/2 sheet designs and gotten nice, fairly easy to row results, but the stability is far less than with a big traditional rowboat. With a big boat you, the passenger, are a much smaller percentage of the toatl weight, so you can fling it around without much effect. When you are 70% of the total weight, it is a different story!
                  > The length is not the problem, but the 4' width forces a tradeoff between width and freeboard. If you make it narrow to get freeboard, your boat gets tippy, but if you make it too wide then little remains for sides and freeboard--you can't carry much and are at risk in chop (waves) and wind.
                  > My 1 1/2 sheet design was very tippy getting in and out. I have concluded a V bottom does not buy much. The major mistake was making the forward part narrower than the rear--the result is a boat that tips forward quite a bit when the rear passenger gets out.
                  > Somewhere I read a comment by another designer who pointed out that the square/round profile is almost irrelevant to stability. Instead it is getting the center of mass low, LOW. The only solution is to make the seat low relative to the width. Since the weight center is so critical front-to-back as well, if you plan to sometimes take one (or two) passengers, you need the flexibility of a front-to-rear straddle seat.
                  > Tom Schultz
                  > schultz@...
                  > > --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, Thomas De Meijer <tdemeijer@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > Cheers, This file has been added to the Links section a while ago and remains there for anyone wanting more info.
                  > >
                  > > > > From: ezguine <ken.nesbitt@>
                  > > > > Subject: [onesheetwonders] Just joined
                  > > > > To: onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com
                  > > > > Received: Tuesday, 2 June, 2009, 6:53 PM
                  > > > > Greetings group.  Just joined
                  > > > > your group.
                  > > > > Been looking to build a ply-on-frame one sheeter that's
                  > > > > easy to build, lite in weight to move around easily and also
                  > > > > that you could actually fish in without swamping. 
                  > > > > The 1 sheet skiffs look like nice little boats, but only
                  > > > > for gently rowing.  They seem to me that the
                  > > > > side-to-side rocking action from casting out or trying to
                  > > > > land a fish onto the boat to much water would come in. Not
                  > > > > enough freeboard.
                  > > > > Does anybody care to share some plans or links for a good
                  > > > > frame-on-ply (No fiberglassing) cheapo 1/4" lauan that fits
                  > > > > easily into the back of the truck for some flat water pond
                  > > > > fishing?
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Thanks all
                  > > > >
                  > > > > EZguine
                  >
                • woodislands
                  I like the comments about flat bottoms. Since I have to drag my dinghy across rocks to launch, it is better to be flat with rails on the bottom, and the
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jun 4, 2009
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                    I like the comments about flat bottoms. Since I have to drag my dinghy across rocks to launch, it is better to be flat with rails on the bottom, and the stability is probably better anyway. I have found a site, http://koti.kapsi.fi/hvartial/dinghy1/simboii.htm, where the author gives out free plans (not one sheet, though). Somewhere he even had a plot of the best displacement as a function of distance along the boat, assuming its flat bottom curves out of the water at the front and rear. A cosine function or something like that. If you follow it, it doesn't matter how the width varies as long as the below-the-water cross sections go from zero to a maximum near the centre and drop back to zero at the stern, following the function. It seems especially fitting for non-pointy dinghies that are maximizing displacement with minimum materials.
                    Tom
                  • jbrotorua
                    ... Cheers Tom, I will check it out thanks.
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jun 4, 2009
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                      --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, "woodislands" <schultz@...> wrote:

                      Cheers Tom, I will check it out thanks.
                      >
                      > I like the comments about flat bottoms. Since I have to drag my dinghy across rocks to launch, it is better to be flat with rails on the bottom, and the stability is probably better anyway. I have found a site, http://koti.kapsi.fi/hvartial/dinghy1/simboii.htm, where the author gives out free plans (not one sheet, though). Somewhere he even had a plot of the best displacement as a function of distance along the boat, assuming its flat bottom curves out of the water at the front and rear. A cosine function or something like that. If you follow it, it doesn't matter how the width varies as long as the below-the-water cross sections go from zero to a maximum near the centre and drop back to zero at the stern, following the function. It seems especially fitting for non-pointy dinghies that are maximizing displacement with minimum materials.
                      > Tom
                      >
                    • ezguine
                      That s Hannu s Boatyard , lots of one sheet plans and other boats he has for free. I was looking at his Portuquese Style Dinghy to maybe figure out how to
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jun 5, 2009
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                        That's "Hannu's Boatyard", lots of one sheet plans and other boats he has for free. I was looking at his 'Portuquese Style Dinghy' to maybe figure out how to convert it to ply on frame construction but his assessment of that boat seems to be that very difficult to row in a straight line. With all that rocker it must be like trying to row a bowl. I am scaling down your Boyak to 15% to build a model of it to sit G.I. Joe dolls in it to see how stable it is. So far, out of all the one-sheeter plans I looked at, the Boyak seems to fit my needs best. A easy to build lightwieght boat from luaun ply that when it gives out I can just build another. The only thing I see with the narrow width is it rolling easy but I have read your comments on it's fair amount of stability.
                        Below is the link to Hannu's home page
                        http://koti.kapsi.fi/hvartial/


                        --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, "jbrotorua" <cyrptsofalzaria@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, "woodislands" <schultz@> wrote:
                        >
                        > Cheers Tom, I will check it out thanks.
                        > >
                        > > I like the comments about flat bottoms. Since I have to drag my dinghy across rocks to launch, it is better to be flat with rails on the bottom, and the stability is probably better anyway. I have found a site, http://koti.kapsi.fi/hvartial/dinghy1/simboii.htm, where the author gives out free plans (not one sheet, though). Somewhere he even had a plot of the best displacement as a function of distance along the boat, assuming its flat bottom curves out of the water at the front and rear. A cosine function or something like that. If you follow it, it doesn't matter how the width varies as long as the below-the-water cross sections go from zero to a maximum near the centre and drop back to zero at the stern, following the function. It seems especially fitting for non-pointy dinghies that are maximizing displacement with minimum materials.
                        > > Tom
                        > >
                        >
                      • jbrotorua
                        ... Hannu`s Portuguese Style Dinghy should track ok in a straight line if a keel skeg is added for direction. Even a side dagger board would give direction,
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jun 5, 2009
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                          --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, "ezguine" <ken.nesbitt@...> wrote:

                          Hannu`s Portuguese Style Dinghy should track ok in a straight line if a keel skeg is added for direction. Even a side dagger board would give direction, also remember the comments of weight distribution depending on your body type and the boyak should have good stability.
                          Keeping mind its a small vessel ideally for calm conditions and used with a double paddle. Read up on some kayak and canoe paddling techniques like using the paddle blade flat down on the water to push back in a roll, the same principals of kayaking should be used with the Bojak. Also send us a photo of the G.I Joe mission, throw a few photos in the members section folder for a laugh. Keep us updated on the project.

                          Cheers Phil


                          >
                          > That's "Hannu's Boatyard", lots of one sheet plans and other boats he has for free. I was looking at his 'Portuquese Style Dinghy' to maybe figure out how to convert it to ply on frame construction but his assessment of that boat seems to be that very difficult to row in a straight line. With all that rocker it must be like trying to row a bowl. I am scaling down your Boyak to 15% to build a model of it to sit G.I. Joe dolls in it to see how stable it is. So far, out of all the one-sheeter plans I looked at, the Boyak seems to fit my needs best. A easy to build lightwieght boat from luaun ply that when it gives out I can just build another. The only thing I see with the narrow width is it rolling easy but I have read your comments on it's fair amount of stability.
                          > Below is the link to Hannu's home page
                          > http://koti.kapsi.fi/hvartial/
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, "jbrotorua" <cyrptsofalzaria@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, "woodislands" <schultz@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Cheers Tom, I will check it out thanks.
                          > > >
                          > > > I like the comments about flat bottoms. Since I have to drag my dinghy across rocks to launch, it is better to be flat with rails on the bottom, and the stability is probably better anyway. I have found a site, http://koti.kapsi.fi/hvartial/dinghy1/simboii.htm, where the author gives out free plans (not one sheet, though). Somewhere he even had a plot of the best displacement as a function of distance along the boat, assuming its flat bottom curves out of the water at the front and rear. A cosine function or something like that. If you follow it, it doesn't matter how the width varies as long as the below-the-water cross sections go from zero to a maximum near the centre and drop back to zero at the stern, following the function. It seems especially fitting for non-pointy dinghies that are maximizing displacement with minimum materials.
                          > > > Tom
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
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