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One sheet boat idea model

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  • kbgwp
    I just made a full size model of my one sheet boat idea. For this test model I used a piece of paneling just to see what the shape of the boat looks like full
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 6 1:32 PM
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      I just made a full size model of my one sheet boat idea.  For this test model I used a piece of paneling just to see what the shape of the boat looks like full size.

      Photos will be here  once they are approved.

      This boat model was put together using 6 nails into the frame and some aluminum duct tape.  Notice that I wasn't careful enough cutting out the bottom so there are some cracks but it did prove the design looks alright to my eye.  I doubt I will be able to test it in the water without some better connections so I still don't know how it will handle in the water or how much weight it would hold but it is better than a paper model to show the size and shape.  I think if I build this boat for real I would change the transom angle to straighten it up a bit more.  I had a little extra material for the bottom panel so I'm thinking maybe 5" instead of the 6" that I used in my plans would be nicer.  Also, I plan to use at least an outer gunwale to strengthen the sides but didn't bother for this model.

      Brian in PA
    • Jack
      Great, thanks for sharing your one sheet boat idea the photos will be appreciated. I ve found on my designs boyak and the transom versions that 26/28 in bottom
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 6 3:05 PM
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        Great, thanks for sharing your one sheet boat idea the photos will be appreciated.

        I've found on my designs boyak and the transom versions that 26/28 in bottom beam and 10 in sides with the added 2 in from a gunnel strip is a good compromise.

        24 is ok but the wider you can get your beam will make a world of difference to your stability. once again thanks for the photos great idea, hope you get it to the water. Please keep posting, if their is any ideas you need help with dont hesitate to post and message.
        Phil.

        --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, "kbgwp" <kbgwp@...> wrote:
        >
        > I just made a full size model of my one sheet boat idea. For this test
        > model I used a piece of paneling just to see what the shape of the boat
        > looks like full size.
        >
        > Photos will be here
        > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/onesheetwonders/photos/album/1240477996/p\
        > ic/list> once they are approved.
        >
        > This boat model was put together using 6 nails into the frame and some
        > aluminum duct tape. Notice that I wasn't careful enough cutting out the
        > bottom so there are some cracks but it did prove the design looks
        > alright to my eye. I doubt I will be able to test it in the water
        > without some better connections so I still don't know how it will handle
        > in the water or how much weight it would hold but it is better than a
        > paper model to show the size and shape. I think if I build this boat
        > for real I would change the transom angle to straighten it up a bit
        > more. I had a little extra material for the bottom panel so I'm
        > thinking maybe 5" instead of the 6" that I used in my plans would be
        > nicer. Also, I plan to use at least an outer gunwale to strengthen the
        > sides but didn't bother for this model.
        >
        > Brian in PA
        >
      • kbgwp
        Thanks Phil, I added a few more pictures. I had to see how this design floated so I braced up the bottom to keep from going through the thin paneling and to
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 7 10:27 AM
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          Thanks Phil,

          I added a few more pictures.  I had to see how this design floated so I braced up the bottom to keep from going through the thin paneling and to better hold the bottom to the sides.  Then I waterproofed the boat by wrapping it with a double layer of plastic.  Then off to the little pond above the house for a test.

          As you stated, it was a bit unstable.  Not real bad...about like a kayak.  I rocked it side to side a little and it did OK just felt a little tippy.

          If I build this boat for real, I will probably shorten the sides an inch or two like you suggested and also straighten up the transom a little more.  I'm tempted, if I try again, to change the amount of rocker on the back from 3" down to 2" but I don't know if that is needed or if it would make it better or worse.  Sitting on the bench, it looked like it had quite a bit of rocker to the bottom.

          This test at least gave me an idea of how the boat looked as well as how it handled and it didn't really cost me anything except a little time.  I had the old paneling and the tape and nails and I built the frame when I first drew up the plans.

          Cheap Fun!

          Brian in PA

          *** I posted this design to the wooden boat forum here  if anyone is interested ***

          --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, "Jack" wrote:
          >
          > Great, thanks for sharing your one sheet boat idea the photos will be appreciated.
          >
          > I've found on my designs boyak and the transom versions that 26/28 in bottom beam and 10 in sides with the added 2 in from a gunnel strip is a good compromise.
          >
          > 24 is ok but the wider you can get your beam will make a world of difference to your stability. once again thanks for the photos great idea, hope you get it to the water. Please keep posting, if their is any ideas you need help with dont hesitate to post and message.
          > Phil.
          >
          > --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, "kbgwp" kbgwp@ wrote:
          > >
          > > I just made a full size model of my one sheet boat idea. For this test
          > > model I used a piece of paneling just to see what the shape of the boat
          > > looks like full size.
          > >
          > > Photos will be here
          > > > > ic/list> once they are approved.
          > >
          > > This boat model was put together using 6 nails into the frame and some
          > > aluminum duct tape. Notice that I wasn't careful enough cutting out the
          > > bottom so there are some cracks but it did prove the design looks
          > > alright to my eye. I doubt I will be able to test it in the water
          > > without some better connections so I still don't know how it will handle
          > > in the water or how much weight it would hold but it is better than a
          > > paper model to show the size and shape. I think if I build this boat
          > > for real I would change the transom angle to straighten it up a bit
          > > more. I had a little extra material for the bottom panel so I'm
          > > thinking maybe 5" instead of the 6" that I used in my plans would be
          > > nicer. Also, I plan to use at least an outer gunwale to strengthen the
          > > sides but didn't bother for this model.
          > >
          > > Brian in PA
          > >
          >
        • nutty_boats
          Looks like a nice little pond boat. Especially your later iteration as with a beam of 26 inches at the chines. Why not make it of 1/8 inch doorskin? Those come
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 9 11:01 AM
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            Looks like a nice little pond boat. Especially your later iteration as with a beam of 26 inches at the chines.

            Why not make it of 1/8 inch doorskin? Those come in 4x8 foot sheets. It will make it very light, about 25 lbs, great fun for the kids. Door skins are strong enough to hold an adult in a floating structure (boat), just be careful not to bash it against rocks.

            T. Lee.

            --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, "kbgwp" <kbgwp@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks Phil,
            >
            > I added a few more pictures. I had to see how this design floated so I braced up the bottom to keep from going through the thin paneling and to better hold the bottom to the sides. Then I waterproofed the boat by wrapping it with a double layer of plastic. Then off to the little pond above the house for a test.
            >
            > As you stated, it was a bit unstable. Not real bad...about like a kayak. I rocked it side to side a little and it did OK just felt a little tippy.
            >
            > If I build this boat for real, I will probably shorten the sides an inch or two like you suggested and also straighten up the transom a little more. I'm tempted, if I try again, to change the amount of rocker on the back from 3" down to 2" but I don't know if that is needed or if it would make it better or worse. Sitting on the bench, it looked like it had quite a bit of rocker to the bottom.
            >
            > This test at least gave me an idea of how the boat looked as well as how it handled and it didn't really cost me anything except a little time. I had the old paneling and the tape and nails and I built the frame when I first drew up the plans.
            >
            > Cheap Fun!
            >
            > Brian in PA
            >
          • kbgwp
            Thanks for the idea T. Lee. I ll look around at Lowes whenever I make it there again for the doorskin. I also see that, in another new post on this forum,
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 11 12:18 PM
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              Thanks for the idea T. Lee. I'll look around at Lowes whenever I make it there again for the doorskin. I also see that, in another new post on this forum, that 1 quart of epoxy should be enough for a boat this size so I might go with that instead of PL Premium or other substitutes.

              I redesigned this boat yet again and posted a few more pictures to this group. I decided to add an extra frame to my design to give me a good place to attach a small seat and widened the bottom and shortened the sides. I haven't tried this one yet but I think it may be the design I eventually build. My drawings are actually just screen shots from the QCAD program I am using to design this boat but should have enough info to copy it. I'll probably make up better drawing later.

              I also posted a picture of my latest cardstock model and the picture I printed out to make it. This one has the frames and the rest of the parts in the same sheet to keep everything the same scale.

              I was going to post the DXF file for anyone with CAD but don't have a way to post files to this group.

              Brian in PA

              --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, "nutty_boats" <nutty_boats@...> wrote:
              >
              > Looks like a nice little pond boat. Especially your later iteration as with a beam of 26 inches at the chines.
              >
              > Why not make it of 1/8 inch doorskin? Those come in 4x8 foot sheets. It will make it very light, about 25 lbs, great fun for the kids. Door skins are strong enough to hold an adult in a floating structure (boat), just be careful not to bash it against rocks.
              >
              > T. Lee.
              >
            • nutty_boats
              ... I checked the local Lowes, and they have only interior doorskins, not exterior. I ended up getting exterior from another lumber store. Exterior has the
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 11 1:25 PM
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                Brian:

                --- In onesheetwonders@yahoogroups.com, "kbgwp" <kbgwp@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > Thanks for the idea T. Lee. I'll look around at Lowes whenever I make it there again for the doorskin. I also see that, in another new post on this forum, that 1 quart of epoxy should be enough for a boat this size so I might go with that instead of PL Premium or other substitutes.

                I checked the local Lowes, and they have only interior doorskins, not exterior. I ended up getting exterior from another lumber store. Exterior has the same glues as marine ply, interior ... ?
                >
                >
                T. Lee.
              • Dave Bell
                Brian, regarding posting screenshots from QCAD, you might want to pick up the free CutePDF application. It installs as a printer on your system, so when you
                Message 7 of 9 , Jul 12 8:06 AM
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                  Brian, regarding posting screenshots from QCAD, you might want to pick up the free CutePDF application.

                  It installs as a printer on your system, so when you print from QCAD you can chose CutePDF for output and it will generate a full quality pdf file.

                  You should then be able to post that. It will be pan/zoomable so even tiny dimension and notes printing is perfectly clear.

                   

                  Dave

                • kbgwp
                  I added some more pictures and drawings to my picture folder with my latest
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jul 16 5:11 PM
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                    I added some more pictures and drawings to my picture folder with my latest version of this one sheet boat.  I added in a transom frame to give a place to attach the sides and bottom better.  I also shortened the frames to allow an inwale without notching the frames.

                    I'm still working on the design and waiting to get a sheet of plywood.  I plan to use underlayment plywood since it is available and cheap locally and I'm not real sure how good this design will work.

                    I'm debating on using PL Premium glue or epoxy.  I will likely go with the glue and possibly polyester resin to keep from investing too much in this still untested design.

                    Brian in PA
                  • kbgwp
                    I just found a message from KEN in my spam mailbox and thought I d repost it here since it doesn t seem to have showed up on this group and others may be
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jul 17 11:00 AM
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                      I just found a message from KEN in my spam mailbox and thought I'd repost it here since it doesn't seem to have showed up on this group and others may be interested in it.  If it was meant to be private, let me know and I'll delete it but it probably just got misplaced.

                      I'm also going to post the attached picture he sent in my photo album for others to see.  It's not my pictures and again, if I shouldn't have posted them let me know and I'll delete them.  I'm pretty sure it is not a one sheet boat but thought it was worth saving.

                      My underlayment that I plan to use is the 3 ply plus 2 very thin veneers.  I used it on a Summer Breeze boat and it is holding up pretty good.  There is a little bit of delaminating or bubbling in a few places but I think if I had sealed the edges better that may not have happened.  It was around $20 per sheet so the cost was not bad for a cheap boat.  I probably wouldn't use it on a  bigger, more expensive boat but for a cheap boat it seems to work. 

                      Brian in PA

                      Here's KEN'S messages:

                      "underlayment" I'd already learned.. theres a single core type with veneers I consider junky, and theres a Chinese meranti luan that has 3 core lams then the veneers for a total of 5 lams, real good!
                      the meranti stuff has a bright pink glue I've boil tested, it passed being boiled 1/2 hr really well.
                      the 5 lam slightly thinner but lots more rigid, like a micro plywood. my little electric boat is completely skinned with the stuff after the skeleton frame was built (photos). there was no "plan", I just started with its frames, then stringers, chines, gunwales, etc.. even the steering wheel is made from the same type of luan laminated up (fun with a router).
                       
                      check out what "FLO-MO" has done with one sheet.. http://flo-mo.weebly.com/one-sheet-boats.html
                      "little sailor" and "OS Core Sound 92" are pretty cool, slightly complex and very little waste.
                      in his two sheet section at the bottom, is "flywood" from two sheets, near 16 ft long canoe.
                      some details about building are left out, but if you've built you know, it'll require a good keel strip,
                      strong filleting between bottom and sides, laminating up strong gunwales, fiberglassing it all..
                       
                      most construction methods and tips can be picked up reading Hannu's Boatyard site a couple times over, small zipties are great temporary stitching for filleting, he uses epoxy and flour mixed..
                       
                      its not a one sheeter, but I want to try my hand at building FLO-MO's 2 sheet flywood canoe,
                      using polyester resin for fiberglassing (less UV sensitive than epoxy that needs paint)
                      so the wood can show through (is called "bright finish") might be pretty sweet looking.
                        

                      and another one:

                      forgot to mention, my own woodworkings, I use 1" and 1-1/4" drywall screws a LOT as temporary clamping, with small squares of the 5 lam luan so the screws heads dont make divots.
                      for the glue itself, titebond type3 waterproof wood glue whenever possible,
                      attaching panels to stringers, chine logs, gunwales etc.
                      after sanding, covered with tape cloth and resin, you dont see the screw holes at all.
                      (they get resin packed into em by the squeegee paddles)
                       
                      -note- on the electric runabout, taped the seams first, then the bottom cloth overlap wrapped up the sides about 4", and the cloth sides overlapping wrapping onto the bottom the same, so the chine logs got covered total of 3 layers cloth, 6oz "tape" (4" wide), 6oz bottom cloth, 4oz sides.
                      from the chine corner, 2" is 3 layers thick, 2-4" is 2 layers thick, then panel main being 1 layer.
                      more protection to where the boat is most likely to get bumped!
                      the bow point got 4" then 7" then sides overlapping each other (6+6+4+4)
                      and the bow's bottom point..for overlapping everything, might be 7-8 layers thick total.
                      I figured sometimes it's gonna get nosed into a beach, sand and small rocks etc.
                       
                      on another project, simplicityboats one sheet mini sharpie, I used long -twigs-,
                      about 3/8 x 3/8, for inside chine logs, using zipties through small holes to pull em in tight.
                      they werent big enough to use screws that wouldda just split em.
                      the twigs had to be small to follow those curves without breaking (bottom to sides).
                      fiberglass resin after, when taping the seams, filled the holes left behind from the removed zipties.
                       
                      the FLO-MO guy uses 2" package strapping tape outside, epoxy tape and filleting inside first,
                      then removes the strapping tape, sands then covers the outside in cloth and epoxy..
                      I cant remember the forum address where he details his building methods, everything he cuts out is done with just a utility knife scoring repeatedly until the panel is cut through (no saws?!).
                      -theres sure a lot of ways to skin a cat!



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