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  • robansuefarm
    One of the things I ve been looking for awhile now is a documented one- room school lunch basket. They were mentioned in ads, but never with an image. I have
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 18, 2008
      One of the things I've been looking for awhile now is a documented one-
      room school lunch basket. They were mentioned in ads, but never with
      an image. I have finally found one documented to the 1880s.

      Read more about it and see a photo on my blog.
      http://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2008/11/18/one-room-school-lunch-
      baskets/

      Sarah S. Uthoff
      suthoff@...
    • Susan
      ... one- ... Thata a beauty. I recently purchased a lunch basket in a NH antique store and put it in our schoolhouse just last week! I will go photograph it
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 18, 2008
        --- In oneroom@yahoogroups.com, "robansuefarm" <suthoff@...> wrote:
        >
        > One of the things I've been looking for awhile now is a documented
        one-
        > room school lunch basket. They were mentioned in ads, but never with
        > an image. I have finally found one documented to the 1880s.
        >
        > Read more about it and see a photo on my blog.
        > http://trundlebedtales.wordpress.com/2008/11/18/one-room-school-lunch-
        > baskets/
        >
        > Sarah S. Uthoff
        > suthoff@...
        >
        Thata' a beauty. I recently purchased a lunch basket in a NH antique
        store and put it in our schoolhouse just last week! I will go
        photograph it next week and post a picture for you. It is not a picnic
        basket since it's much smaller and seems to be designed for just about
        one lunch. I'll get back to you when I get the picture.
        Susan Fineman
      • Fay Stone
        In our area of the midwest, we have never found that baskets were used for kids school lunches, although they were used for about everything, and could have
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 19, 2008
          In our area of the midwest, we have never found that baskets were used for kids school lunches, although they were used for about everything, and could have been a lunch basket, too.

          It's my personal opinion as a one room school teacher, that baskets would have been a little bit fragile for use by small children in the rough and tumble of a school room.

          At the Sholes School Museum, we found our children of the 1890's usually used a small lidded tin bucket, and they were called lunch buckets. Sometimes these were formerly lard buckets.Some buckets were 'growlers' and were used to fetch home beer from the local tavern (before cans and bottles) or for picking berries or whatever.

          There were roving tin peddlers who sold and repaired these and other tin objects used in the home.

          Fay Stone

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • daspeer@comcast.net
          I am new to this chat room, but I hope I can contribute and learn a lot here. Have you heard of the Towner Bus Tragedy? My mother was the Clara Smith the
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 20, 2008
            I am new to this chat room, but I hope I can contribute and learn a lot here.

            Have you heard of the Towner Bus Tragedy? My mother was the Clara Smith the oldest child on the bus. Five of her classmates and the bus driver perished in a little blue school bus that become trapped in a March 27, 1931 storm in Southeastern Colorado. A book written by the Colorado Historical Society, "Children of the Storm" gives an account of that event. One of the resources that the authors used in writing the book was my mother's written account.

            Now to baskets and lunch pails. In Southeastern Colorado according to my mother's writing the students brought their lunch in empty syrup cans. I suppose of the type that I remember in the 50's that Karo syrup used.

            Regards,

            Darell

            -------------- Original message --------------
            From: "Fay Stone" <stonef@...>
            In our area of the midwest, we have never found that baskets were used for kids school lunches, although they were used for about everything, and could have been a lunch basket, too.

            It's my personal opinion as a one room school teacher, that baskets would have been a little bit fragile for use by small children in the rough and tumble of a school room.

            At the Sholes School Museum, we found our children of the 1890's usually used a small lidded tin bucket, and they were called lunch buckets. Sometimes these were formerly lard buckets.Some buckets were 'growlers' and were used to fetch home beer from the local tavern (before cans and bottles) or for picking berries or whatever.

            There were roving tin peddlers who sold and repaired these and other tin objects used in the home.

            Fay Stone

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • suthoff@mchsi.com
            Let me backtrack a little, I m not claiming that people only used baskets. In my research on school lunch I found quite a few references to the baskets,
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 23, 2008
              Let me backtrack a little, I'm not claiming that people only used baskets. In
              my research on school lunch I found quite a few references to the baskets,
              especially newspaper ads from the mid-to-late 19th century advertising school
              lunch baskets for sale. I don't know how widely they were used as I said. Both
              homemade and store bought lunch pails and metal boxes seem to be fairly common
              from at least 1890 on and from first quarter of the 20th century on a high
              number of people in the surveys I've collected said they used brown paper
              sacks. However, while I have found plenty of images and surviving lunch pails
              and boxes, but neither images or surviving baskets so I was excited to see
              this one.

              Sarah S. Uthoff
            • Leigh Ann
              Hi! We are replacing the inside entranceway (cloakroom) door mats at our 1876 school and wondered if anyone had a suggestion/supplier of something that might
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 23, 2008
                Hi!



                We are replacing the inside entranceway (cloakroom) door mats at our 1876
                school and wondered if anyone had a suggestion/supplier of something that
                might look more "historic" then the hardware store ones we had. They work
                well but don't match the character of the inside. We can have a lot of
                school kids tramping in during the winter so they would have to be practical
                and actually help keep the snow, sand, and grime out of the interior
                classroom.



                Thanks.





                Leigh Ann Randak

                Curator

                Johnson County Historical Society

                319-351-5738

                leighann@...

                www.johnsoncountyhistory.org







                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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