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"An Apple for the Teacher"

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  • Robert Goodman
    One responder e-mailed me: In the old days when food was not as readily available as it is today, an apple was a cherished item. Giving a precious apple to
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 1, 2008
      One responder e-mailed me:

      In the "old days" when food was not as readily available as it is
      today, an apple was a cherished item. Giving a precious apple to the
      teacher was a sign of respect. In years past, students learned early
      the adage "An apple a day keeps the doctor away," which helped
      reinforce the value of the fruit.

      Do any of you have any resources which document this info.? I work
      for a living history museum, and must have documentation before I add
      anything into my interpretation of our schoolhouse.
    • Picard, Dennis
      Well, this sure sounds like a good old daysism to me. I continue to be surprised at these kinds of things that show up periodically - that no one has heard
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 1, 2008
        Well, this sure sounds like a "good old daysism" to me. I continue to
        be surprised at these kinds of things that show up periodically - that
        no one has heard of - but is supposed to represent what was so common.
        I'm a museum director and would never let any of my staff impart that
        chestnut. Apples were certainly NOT a food product that was rare or
        particularly prone to spoilage. They were planted early on in the new
        world, and accompanied settlers as they moved inland from the coasts.
        Though harvested over a relatively short season, they were put in
        barrels and boxes for storage and use the rest of the year. They are
        easily transportable and have their own wrapping. They are NOT merely
        available seasonably like blueberry or tomatoes. I won't even start
        with their Protestant association with the fall of sinful man!



        I hope someone else can show that this rationale for apple giving is the
        real deal. It will make some of my story loving volunteers happy to add
        another tale.



        Dennis D. Picard

        Director

        Storrowton Village Museum



        -----Original Message-----
        From: oneroom@yahoogroups.com [mailto:oneroom@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        Of Robert Goodman
        Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 11:09 AM
        To: oneroom@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [oneroom] "An Apple for the Teacher"



        One responder e-mailed me:

        In the "old days" when food was not as readily available as it is
        today, an apple was a cherished item. Giving a precious apple to the
        teacher was a sign of respect. In years past, students learned early
        the adage "An apple a day keeps the doctor away," which helped
        reinforce the value of the fruit.

        Do any of you have any resources which document this info.? I work
        for a living history museum, and must have documentation before I add
        anything into my interpretation of our schoolhouse.





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • hickorystick1830
        Here are two quotes from a couple of websites I found - like 12 pages deep into Google: Googled apple+teacher and came up with this The idea of bringing an
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 1, 2008
          Here are two quotes from a couple of websites I found - like 12 pages
          deep into Google:

          "Googled apple+teacher and came up with this


          The idea of bringing an apple to the teacher (as a bribe or just an
          innocent gift) probably originated in New England in the early days of
          semi-organized schooling, when teachers were paid mainly in foodstuffs
          and candles and other necessities to supplement their minuscule
          salaries. Apples were plentiful, so old-timey teachers probably survived
          on a lot of pie.


          found this same explanation on a few sites, so am thinking it was a
          simple as payment"



          AND

          "Apples have a long history of greasing the wheels of education. Take
          notes -- here's how the classroom corruption began...

          According to aboutapple.com <http://www.aboutapple.com/apple.htm> , the
          juicy fruit is a traditional present for teachers in the United States,
          Denmark, and Sweden. Some think the practice originated as a simple gift
          of food for poorly paid teachers. Others believe the good health
          associated with apples made the present particularly meaningful."





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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