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How would you use ONA in this situation?

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  • Patti Anklam
    Hi, I am subscribed to OD questions on LinkedIn. This question came up two days ago: Icebreaker ideas? I recently was asked to take on a statewide management
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 16, 2009
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      Hi,

       

      I am subscribed to OD questions on LinkedIn. This question came up two days ago:

      Icebreaker ideas? I recently was asked to take on a statewide management role, after managing a region for three years. Just this week, the company itself went through a painful staff reduction (thus resulting in my new role). Tomorrow, I will meet with staff from one of my new regions for the first time. They all know each other well, and know me a little. I'd like to start the meeting with an icebreaker to get to know them a little better (and them, me), but don't want it to feel too hokey, nor do I want it to take a long time. Any suggestions for something light?

      I dashed off this response:

      I never thought about using a network analysis in a situation like this, but it might be interesting. What happens in a downsizing is that the network loses a number of "nodes," that is, links are broken. It might be interesting to draw the network (depending on the number of people) of the group -- who works with who most frequently. Maybe include the people who've left and see what happens to the network when these people are taken out.

      You could also look at the outside connections that are lost -- the people who are gone may have had valuable contacts they were able to access for specific needs. Perhaps brainstorm about how the new group is going to make sure that it can develop its network to replace the people who are missing.

       

      Anyone else have thoughts?  Have you managed this kind of situation using simple mapping exercises?

       

      /patti

       

      Patti Anklam

      Net Work: Leveraging Content, Knowledge and Networks

      Harvard, MA 01451

      +1(978)456-4175

       

       

    • Kathleen Marvin
      Great idea. -Kathleen Marvin ... From: Patti Anklam To: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday, August 16, 2009 6:34 AM Subject: [ona-prac] How would you use
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 16, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Great idea.
         
        -Kathleen Marvin
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Sunday, August 16, 2009 6:34 AM
        Subject: [ona-prac] How would you use ONA in this situation?

         

        Hi,

        I am subscribed to OD questions on LinkedIn. This question came up two days ago:

        Icebreaker ideas? I recently was asked to take on a statewide management role, after managing a region for three years. Just this week, the company itself went through a painful staff reduction (thus resulting in my new role). Tomorrow, I will meet with staff from one of my new regions for the first time. They all know each other well, and know me a little. I'd like to start the meeting with an icebreaker to get to know them a little better (and them, me), but don't want it to feel too hokey, nor do I want it to take a long time. Any suggestions for something light?

        I dashed off this response:

        I never thought about using a network analysis in a situation like this, but it might be interesting. What happens in a downsizing is that the network loses a number of "nodes," that is, links are broken. It might be interesting to draw the network (depending on the number of people) of the group -- who works with who most frequently. Maybe include the people who've left and see what happens to the network when these people are taken out.

        You could also look at the outside connections that are lost -- the people who are gone may have had valuable contacts they were able to access for specific needs. Perhaps brainstorm about how the new group is going to make sure that it can develop its network to replace the people who are missing.

        Anyone else have thoughts?  Have you managed this kind of situation using simple mapping exercises?

        /patti

        Patti Anklam

        Net Work: Leveraging Content, Knowledge and Networks

        Harvard, MA 01451

        +1(978)456-4175

      • Mindy Gewirtz
        Hi Patti, The network idea sounds great. Another exercise might be to have them divide a flip chart sheet in half and take 5 minutes to draw (no words) on one
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 16, 2009
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          Hi Patti,

           

          The network idea sounds great.

           

          Another exercise might be to have them divide a flip chart sheet in half and take 5 minutes  to draw (no words) on one side how they imagine the internal and external social/knowledge collaborative network has been disrupted.

           

          On the other half, draw one thing about themselves that others don’t know (like family, hobbies, vacation etc.) They sign it and hang it up. Each person has a minute to describe their drawing and one thing they would like to see happen, (that they can help with) to move the group and company forward.

           

          Best,

          Mindy

           

          Mindy L. Gewirtz, Ph.D.

          President, Collaborative Networks

          Developing collaborative leadership and organizational networks

          ____________________________________________________________________________

          mindy

          http://www.collaborativenetworks.net

           O: 617-277-7360   M: 617-803-2268

           

          From: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ona-prac@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Patti Anklam
          Sent: Sunday, August 16, 2009 9:35 AM
          To: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [ona-prac] How would you use ONA in this situation?

           

           

          Hi,

           

          I am subscribed to OD questions on LinkedIn. This question came up two days ago:

          Icebreaker ideas? I recently was asked to take on a statewide management role, after managing a region for three years. Just this week, the company itself went through a painful staff reduction (thus resulting in my new role). Tomorrow, I will meet with staff from one of my new regions for the first time. They all know each other well, and know me a little. I'd like to start the meeting with an icebreaker to get to know them a little better (and them, me), but don't want it to feel too hokey, nor do I want it to take a long time. Any suggestions for something light?

          I dashed off this response:

          I never thought about using a network analysis in a situation like this, but it might be interesting. What happens in a downsizing is that the network loses a number of "nodes," that is, links are broken. It might be interesting to draw the network (depending on the number of people) of the group -- who works with who most frequently. Maybe include the people who've left and see what happens to the network when these people are taken out.

          You could also look at the outside connections that are lost -- the people who are gone may have had valuable contacts they were able to access for specific needs. Perhaps brainstorm about how the new group is going to make sure that it can develop its network to replace the people who are missing.

           

          Anyone else have thoughts?  Have you managed this kind of situation using simple mapping exercises?

           

          /patti

           

          Patti Anklam

          Net Work: Leveraging Content, Knowledge and Networks

          Harvard, MA 01451

          +1(978)456-4175

           

           

          No virus found in this incoming message.
          Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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        • Laurence Lock Lee
          Hi Patti . I got an idea from Richard McDermott many years ago around doing a live SNA . The idea is you get people to nominate important topics of interest,
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 16, 2009
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            Hi Patti … I got an idea from Richard McDermott many years ago around doing a “live SNA”. The idea is you get people to nominate important topics of interest, select a few (depending on the size of the group) and then in a large space get the nominators to stand equidistant apart (like poles) and then have the rest of the people place themselves physically close to the poles of greatest interest. When they have divided interest they stand part way … so what you end up with is a spatially developed live affinity network. Richard warned that there is always at least one pole left without any “friends” so you give that person a chance to state their case for why their topic is important. The group can re-arrange based on this if they so desire.

             

            I’ve done this a few time now and its always fun. I like the way that the “lonely” pole always seems to happen and they always speak passionately about their topic. I also respond to those who invariably have trouble locating themselves amongst all these competing interests is that they are simply experiencing what happens in real life! We often make commitments to support communities that in the end we can’t do justice to. Some will fade through lack of a core group and others will thrive because of the depth of interest. It’s a great conversation starter and start to a “new” organisation.

             

            rgds

             

            Laurence Lock Lee PhD

            Partner, Optimice Pty Ltd

            Ph: +61 (0)407001628

            www.optimice.com.au

            Blog: http://governanceandnetworks.blogspot.com/

             

            Learn to network, then network to learn

            From: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ona-prac@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Patti Anklam
            Sent: Sunday, 16 August 2009 11:35 PM
            To: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [ona-prac] How would you use ONA in this situation?

             

             

            Hi,

             

            I am subscribed to OD questions on LinkedIn. This question came up two days ago:

            Icebreaker ideas? I recently was asked to take on a statewide management role, after managing a region for three years. Just this week, the company itself went through a painful staff reduction (thus resulting in my new role). Tomorrow, I will meet with staff from one of my new regions for the first time. They all know each other well, and know me a little. I'd like to start the meeting with an icebreaker to get to know them a little better (and them, me), but don't want it to feel too hokey, nor do I want it to take a long time. Any suggestions for something light?

            I dashed off this response:

            I never thought about using a network analysis in a situation like this, but it might be interesting. What happens in a downsizing is that the network loses a number of "nodes," that is, links are broken. It might be interesting to draw the network (depending on the number of people) of the group -- who works with who most frequently. Maybe include the people who've left and see what happens to the network when these people are taken out.

            You could also look at the outside connections that are lost -- the people who are gone may have had valuable contacts they were able to access for specific needs. Perhaps brainstorm about how the new group is going to make sure that it can develop its network to replace the people who are missing.

             

            Anyone else have thoughts?  Have you managed this kind of situation using simple mapping exercises?

             

            /patti

             

            Patti Anklam

            Net Work: Leveraging Content, Knowledge and Networks

            Harvard, MA 01451

            +1(978)456-4175

             

             

          • nathanielwelch@earthlink.net
            laurence; Neat idea and it sounds like a visual way to do something like Open Space Technology... Nat ... Hi Patti … I got an idea from Richard McDermott
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 16, 2009
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              laurence;

               

              Neat idea and it sounds like a visual way to do something like Open Space Technology...

               

              Nat

              -----Original Message-----
              From: Laurence Lock Lee
              Sent: Aug 16, 2009 7:36 PM
              To: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [ona-prac] How would you use ONA in this situation?

               

              Hi Patti … I got an idea from Richard McDermott many years ago around doing a “live SNA”. The idea is you get people to nominate important topics of interest, select a few (depending on the size of the group) and then in a large space get the nominators to stand equidistant apart (like poles) and then have the rest of the people place themselves physically close to the poles of greatest interest. When they have divided interest they stand part way … so what you end up with is a spatially developed live affinity network. Richard warned that there is always at least one pole left without any “friends” so you give that person a chance to state their case for why their topic is important. The group can re-arrange based on this if they so desire.

              I’ve done this a few time now and its always fun. I like the way that the “lonely” pole always seems to happen and they always speak passionately about their topic. I also respond to those who invariably have trouble locating themselves amongst all these competing interests is that they are simply experiencing what happens in real life! We often make commitments to support communities that in the end we can’t do justice to. Some will fade through lack of a core group and others will thrive because of the depth of interest. It’s a great conversation starter and start to a “new” organisation.

              rgds

              Laurence Lock Lee PhD

              Partner, Optimice Pty Ltd

              Ph: +61 (0)407001628

              www.optimice. com.au

              Blog: http://governancean dnetworks. blogspot. com/

              Learn to network, then network to learn

              From: ona-prac@yahoogroup s.com [mailto:ona- prac@yahoogroups .com] On Behalf Of Patti Anklam
              Sent: Sunday, 16 August 2009 11:35 PM
              To: ona-prac@yahoogroup s.com
              Subject: [ona-prac] How would you use ONA in this situation?

               

              Hi,

              I am subscribed to OD questions on LinkedIn. This question came up two days ago:

              Icebreaker ideas? I recently was asked to take on a statewide management role, after managing a region for three years. Just this week, the company itself went through a painful staff reduction (thus resulting in my new role). Tomorrow, I will meet with staff from one of my new regions for the first time. They all know each other well, and know me a little. I'd like to start the meeting with an icebreaker to get to know them a little better (and them, me), but don't want it to feel too hokey, nor do I want it to take a long time. Any suggestions for something light?

              I dashed off this response:

              I never thought about using a network analysis in a situation like this, but it might be interesting. What happens in a downsizing is that the network loses a number of "nodes," that is, links are broken. It might be interesting to draw the network (depending on the number of people) of the group -- who works with who most frequently. Maybe include the people who've left and see what happens to the network when these people are taken out.

              You could also look at the outside connections that are lost -- the people who are gone may have had valuable contacts they were able to access for specific needs. Perhaps brainstorm about how the new group is going to make sure that it can develop its network to replace the people who are missing.

              Anyone else have thoughts?  Have you managed this kind of situation using simple mapping exercises?

              /patti

              Patti Anklam

              Net Work: Leveraging Content, Knowledge and Networks

              Harvard, MA 01451

              +1(978)456-4175

            • Joan Boysen
              This is quite a clever idea and I can see that it would make quite an impression. Please forgive my spatial disabilities, but I can t quite picture the part
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 16, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                This is quite a clever idea and I can see that it would make quite an impression.  Please forgive my spatial disabilities, but I can't quite picture the part where "When they have divided interest they stand part way … so what you end up with is a spatially developed live affinity network."

                Thank you.

                On Sun, Aug 16, 2009 at 6:36 PM, Laurence Lock Lee <llocklee@...> wrote:
                 

                Hi Patti … I got an idea from Richard McDermott many years ago around doing a “live SNA”. The idea is you get people to nominate important topics of interest, select a few (depending on the size of the group) and then in a large space get the nominators to stand equidistant apart (like poles) and then have the rest of the people place themselves physically close to the poles of greatest interest. When they have divided interest they stand part way … so what you end up with is a spatially developed live affinity network. Richard warned that there is always at least one pole left without any “friends” so you give that person a chance to state their case for why their topic is important. The group can re-arrange based on this if they so desire.

                 

                I’ve done this a few time now and its always fun. I like the way that the “lonely” pole always seems to happen and they always speak passionately about their topic. I also respond to those who invariably have trouble locating themselves amongst all these competing interests is that they are simply experiencing what happens in real life! We often make commitments to support communities that in the end we can’t do justice to. Some will fade through lack of a core group and others will thrive because of the depth of interest. It’s a great conversation starter and start to a “new” organisation.

                 

                rgds

                 

                Laurence Lock Lee PhD

                Partner, Optimice Pty Ltd

                Ph: +61 (0)407001628

                www.optimice.com.au

                Blog: http://governanceandnetworks.blogspot.com/

                 

                Learn to network, then network to learn

                From: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ona-prac@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Patti Anklam
                Sent: Sunday, 16 August 2009 11:35 PM
                To: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [ona-prac] How would you use ONA in this situation?

                 

                 

                Hi,

                 

                I am subscribed to OD questions on LinkedIn. This question came up two days ago:

                Icebreaker ideas? I recently was asked to take on a statewide management role, after managing a region for three years. Just this week, the company itself went through a painful staff reduction (thus resulting in my new role). Tomorrow, I will meet with staff from one of my new regions for the first time. They all know each other well, and know me a little. I'd like to start the meeting with an icebreaker to get to know them a little better (and them, me), but don't want it to feel too hokey, nor do I want it to take a long time. Any suggestions for something light?

                I dashed off this response:

                I never thought about using a network analysis in a situation like this, but it might be interesting. What happens in a downsizing is that the network loses a number of "nodes," that is, links are broken. It might be interesting to draw the network (depending on the number of people) of the group -- who works with who most frequently. Maybe include the people who've left and see what happens to the network when these people are taken out.

                You could also look at the outside connections that are lost -- the people who are gone may have had valuable contacts they were able to access for specific needs. Perhaps brainstorm about how the new group is going to make sure that it can develop its network to replace the people who are missing.

                 

                Anyone else have thoughts?  Have you managed this kind of situation using simple mapping exercises?

                 

                /patti

                 

                Patti Anklam

                Net Work: Leveraging Content, Knowledge and Networks

                Harvard, MA 01451

                +1(978)456-4175

                 

                 


              • Laurence Lock Lee
                Hi Joan .. Basically to view it you will usually have to stand up on the stage or a balcony or chair to look down on the people from above. A stage is good so
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 17, 2009
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                  Hi Joan …. Basically to view it you will usually have to stand up on the stage or a balcony or chair to look down on the people from above. A stage is good so that as the facilitator you can point out the clusters.

                   

                  Laurence Lock Lee PhD

                  Partner, Optimice Pty Ltd

                  Ph: +61 (0)407001628

                  www.optimice.com.au

                  Blog: http://governanceandnetworks.blogspot.com/

                   

                  Learn to network, then network to learn

                  From: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ona-prac@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Joan Boysen
                  Sent: Monday, 17 August 2009 11:38 AM
                  To: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [ona-prac] How would you use ONA in this situation?

                   

                   

                  This is quite a clever idea and I can see that it would make quite an impression.  Please forgive my spatial disabilities, but I can't quite picture the part where "When they have divided interest they stand part way … so what you end up with is a spatially developed live affinity network."

                  Thank you.

                  On Sun, Aug 16, 2009 at 6:36 PM, Laurence Lock Lee <llocklee@...> wrote:

                   

                  Hi Patti … I got an idea from Richard McDermott many years ago around doing a “live SNA”. The idea is you get people to nominate important topics of interest, select a few (depending on the size of the group) and then in a large space get the nominators to stand equidistant apart (like poles) and then have the rest of the people place themselves physically close to the poles of greatest interest. When they have divided interest they stand part way … so what you end up with is a spatially developed live affinity network. Richard warned that there is always at least one pole left without any “friends” so you give that person a chance to state their case for why their topic is important. The group can re-arrange based on this if they so desire.

                   

                  I’ve done this a few time now and its always fun. I like the way that the “lonely” pole always seems to happen and they always speak passionately about their topic. I also respond to those who invariably have trouble locating themselves amongst all these competing interests is that they are simply experiencing what happens in real life! We often make commitments to support communities that in the end we can’t do justice to. Some will fade through lack of a core group and others will thrive because of the depth of interest. It’s a great conversation starter and start to a “new” organisation.

                   

                  rgds

                   

                  Laurence Lock Lee PhD

                  Partner, Optimice Pty Ltd

                  Ph: +61 (0)407001628

                  www.optimice.com.au

                  Blog: http://governanceandnetworks.blogspot.com/

                   

                  Learn to network, then network to learn

                  From: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ona-prac@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Patti Anklam
                  Sent: Sunday, 16 August 2009 11:35 PM
                  To: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [ona-prac] How would you use ONA in this situation?

                   

                   

                  Hi,

                   

                  I am subscribed to OD questions on LinkedIn. This question came up two days ago:

                  Icebreaker ideas? I recently was asked to take on a statewide management role, after managing a region for three years. Just this week, the company itself went through a painful staff reduction (thus resulting in my new role). Tomorrow, I will meet with staff from one of my new regions for the first time. They all know each other well, and know me a little. I'd like to start the meeting with an icebreaker to get to know them a little better (and them, me), but don't want it to feel too hokey, nor do I want it to take a long time. Any suggestions for something light?

                  I dashed off this response:

                  I never thought about using a network analysis in a situation like this, but it might be interesting. What happens in a downsizing is that the network loses a number of "nodes," that is, links are broken. It might be interesting to draw the network (depending on the number of people) of the group -- who works with who most frequently. Maybe include the people who've left and see what happens to the network when these people are taken out.

                  You could also look at the outside connections that are lost -- the people who are gone may have had valuable contacts they were able to access for specific needs. Perhaps brainstorm about how the new group is going to make sure that it can develop its network to replace the people who are missing.

                   

                  Anyone else have thoughts?  Have you managed this kind of situation using simple mapping exercises?

                   

                  /patti

                   

                  Patti Anklam

                  Net Work: Leveraging Content, Knowledge and Networks

                  Harvard, MA 01451

                  +1(978)456-4175

                   

                   

                   

                • Joan Boysen
                  Thanks, now I can see it in my mind. On Mon, Aug 17, 2009 at 5:34 PM, Laurence Lock Lee
                  Message 8 of 9 , Aug 17, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Thanks, now I can see it in my mind.


                    On Mon, Aug 17, 2009 at 5:34 PM, Laurence Lock Lee <llocklee@...> wrote:
                     

                    Hi Joan …. Basically to view it you will usually have to stand up on the stage or a balcony or chair to look down on the people from above. A stage is good so that as the facilitator you can point out the clusters.

                     

                    Laurence Lock Lee PhD

                    Partner, Optimice Pty Ltd

                    Ph: +61 (0)407001628

                    www.optimice.com.au

                    Blog: http://governanceandnetworks.blogspot.com/

                     

                    Learn to network, then network to learn

                    From: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ona-prac@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Joan Boysen
                    Sent: Monday, 17 August 2009 11:38 AM

                    Subject: Re: [ona-prac] How would you use ONA in this situation?

                     

                     

                    This is quite a clever idea and I can see that it would make quite an impression.  Please forgive my spatial disabilities, but I can't quite picture the part where "When they have divided interest they stand part way … so what you end up with is a spatially developed live affinity network."

                    Thank you.

                    On Sun, Aug 16, 2009 at 6:36 PM, Laurence Lock Lee <llocklee@...> wrote:

                     

                    Hi Patti … I got an idea from Richard McDermott many years ago around doing a “live SNA”. The idea is you get people to nominate important topics of interest, select a few (depending on the size of the group) and then in a large space get the nominators to stand equidistant apart (like poles) and then have the rest of the people place themselves physically close to the poles of greatest interest. When they have divided interest they stand part way … so what you end up with is a spatially developed live affinity network. Richard warned that there is always at least one pole left without any “friends” so you give that person a chance to state their case for why their topic is important. The group can re-arrange based on this if they so desire.

                     

                    I’ve done this a few time now and its always fun. I like the way that the “lonely” pole always seems to happen and they always speak passionately about their topic. I also respond to those who invariably have trouble locating themselves amongst all these competing interests is that they are simply experiencing what happens in real life! We often make commitments to support communities that in the end we can’t do justice to. Some will fade through lack of a core group and others will thrive because of the depth of interest. It’s a great conversation starter and start to a “new” organisation.

                     

                    rgds

                     

                    Laurence Lock Lee PhD

                    Partner, Optimice Pty Ltd

                    Ph: +61 (0)407001628

                    www.optimice.com.au

                    Blog: http://governanceandnetworks.blogspot.com/

                     

                    Learn to network, then network to learn

                    From: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ona-prac@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Patti Anklam
                    Sent: Sunday, 16 August 2009 11:35 PM
                    To: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [ona-prac] How would you use ONA in this situation?

                     

                     

                    Hi,

                     

                    I am subscribed to OD questions on LinkedIn. This question came up two days ago:

                    Icebreaker ideas? I recently was asked to take on a statewide management role, after managing a region for three years. Just this week, the company itself went through a painful staff reduction (thus resulting in my new role). Tomorrow, I will meet with staff from one of my new regions for the first time. They all know each other well, and know me a little. I'd like to start the meeting with an icebreaker to get to know them a little better (and them, me), but don't want it to feel too hokey, nor do I want it to take a long time. Any suggestions for something light?

                    I dashed off this response:

                    I never thought about using a network analysis in a situation like this, but it might be interesting. What happens in a downsizing is that the network loses a number of "nodes," that is, links are broken. It might be interesting to draw the network (depending on the number of people) of the group -- who works with who most frequently. Maybe include the people who've left and see what happens to the network when these people are taken out.

                    You could also look at the outside connections that are lost -- the people who are gone may have had valuable contacts they were able to access for specific needs. Perhaps brainstorm about how the new group is going to make sure that it can develop its network to replace the people who are missing.

                     

                    Anyone else have thoughts?  Have you managed this kind of situation using simple mapping exercises?

                     

                    /patti

                     

                    Patti Anklam

                    Net Work: Leveraging Content, Knowledge and Networks

                    Harvard, MA 01451

                    +1(978)456-4175

                     

                     

                     


                  • Valdis Krebs
                    Thought fans of SNA/ONA might enjoy this... Posted this last night... an interactive network map of the cocoon of lobbyists around the Gang of Six Senators
                    Message 9 of 9 , Sep 30, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Thought fans of SNA/ONA might enjoy this...

                      Posted this last night... an interactive network map of the cocoon of
                      lobbyists around the Gang of Six Senators working on health care reform.

                      http://orgnet.com/lobbying.html

                      Valdis
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