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Re: Greetings - Another perspective on Human Terrain Mapping

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  • Peter Gadzinski
    I agree that applying SNA and anthropological insights to the task of sorting out actors in a real world environment is a step forward in DOD thinking and
    Message 1 of 15 , Dec 2, 2007
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      I agree that applying SNA and anthropological insights to the task of
      sorting out actors in a real world environment is a step forward in
      DOD thinking and represents the growing importance of thinking about
      winning in "cognitive space" as well as establishing mastery in
      physical space (sometimes, the two are contradictory). Another
      perspective on this effort arises from formal opposition to
      participation on the part of some U.S. anthropologists as they
      consider some of the HTM techniques to be unethical. Agree or not,
      you have to conclude that applying SNA is not simply an academic
      exercise.

      --- In ona-prac@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Pastore" <bg_rva@...> wrote:
      >
      > Valdis,
      >
      > I did see that article and I think it is a very good indicator of
      > SNA's acceptance within the DOD. I wasn't aware of that effor nor
      do
      > I know what software they are using - wish I did though.
      >
      > Mike
      >
      > --- In ona-prac@yahoogroups.com, Valdis Krebs <valdis@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Mike,
      > >
      > > Have you seen the write-up on "human terrain teams" in WIRED?
      > >
      > > Where you involved with this effort?
      > >
      > > > Each team is getting a half-dozen laptops, a satellite dish
      and
      > > > software for social network analysis, so they can diagram how
      all
      > of
      > > > the important players in an area are connected. Digital
      > timelines
      > > > will mark key cultural and political events. Mapmaking programs
      > will
      > > > plot out the economic, ethnic and tribal landscape.
      > >
      > > http://tinyurl.com/28utez
      > >
      > > A quick, easy and portable network recording device is a great
      > idea...
      > > something like a Palm or Treo or iPhone to quickly record: X is
      > > connected to Y via work and Y and Z are brothers. Then dump all
      > of
      > > that into the SNA data base to see larger patterns.
      > >
      > > Valdis
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > On Nov 30, 2007, at 11:30 AM, Michael Pastore wrote:
      > >
      > > > Valdis,
      > > >
      > > > I could not agree with you more about the intel community no
      being
      > > > more aware of what is already available commercially and in
      > > > academia. Working in a physically closed environment tends to
      > close
      > > > the mind as well, (one of the reasons I had to leave).
      > > >
      > > > As for the meaning of "successful", I must qualify my
      perspective
      > as
      > > > that of a software developer. Regarding the software products I
      > > > mentioned: I was responsible for many of the key ideas, the
      > > > architecture, look and feel, and technical leadership. So when
      > the
      > > > products exceeded customer expectations, were delivered on
      time,
      > and
      > > > were still growing in use when I left: that is successful
      > software.
      > > > My software-centric view of the world is another reason I want
      to
      > see
      > > > the bigger picture.
      > > >
      > > > Mike
      > > >
      > > > --- In ona-prac@yahoogroups.com, Valdis Krebs <valdis@> wrote:
      > > >>
      > > >> Welcome Mike!
      > > >>
      > > >> I am somewhat surprised that you folks "behind the green door"
      > did
      > > > not
      > > >> examine what was done commercially and in academia. It is easy
      > > > for
      > > >> you to see what we are doing... plenty of info available on
      > plenty
      > > > of
      > > >> web sites and good ol' Google. Also, curious about what
      defines
      > a
      > > >> successful SNA app in the black world ... I realize you may
      not
      > be
      > > >> permitted to answer that question.
      > > >>
      > > >> Valdis
      > > >>
      > > >>
      > > >> On Nov 30, 2007, at 9:44 AM, Michael Pastore wrote:
      > > >>
      > > >>> Hello all,
      > > >>>
      > > >>> I am a newbie to ONA and would like to introduce myself.
      > > >>>
      > > >>> I am a sofware developer who recently came out of the "black
      > > > world"
      > > >>> where I created several successful SNA applications. Now
      that I
      > > > am
      > > >>> free, I want to get an understanding of how SNA is used
      outside
      > > > of the
      > > >>> intel space. I am looking forward to seeing the bigger
      picture
      > > > of its
      > > >>> applicability and apply this to new network analysis software
      > > >>> projects.
      > > >>>
      > > >>> Thanks,
      > > >>>
      > > >>> Mike
      > > >>
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Paul Prueitt
      I have conjectured that to frame the non-support of certain academics, for DoD use of social network theory, as being based on ethics is to not see an
      Message 2 of 15 , Dec 2, 2007
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        I have conjectured that to frame the non-support of certain academics, for DoD use of social network theory, as being based on ethics is to not see an important deficit in the way the governments use social network theory.

        Let me explain what i mean.

        A viewpoint is dominate in your society that there is only one correct viewpoint, roughly defined as a religious or even non-religious view that human kind is reducible to behavior.    Religious fundamentalism and scientific reductionism share a lot in common.  Without over reacting to this conjecture, I ask that one sees this as a conjecture and examine this conjecture objectively.

        The key problem with RDF and web ontology languages (as seem from the W3C) is that the RDF triple is build as if there were real world universals (of a specific type, class - subclass hierarchy).  This assertion of the knowledge engineering community makes the resulting ontological models unusable to the needs of social network theory (say as perceived by Ray Bradley and Karl Pribram).  To have a theory of social response, or collective intelligences, one must have a workable mechanism for shifting viewpoints.  

        The way the this works in human consciousness may be seen in the work by Pribram, and my own work.  

        I will pause here and ask for comments.

        Dr Paul S Prueitt
        www.secondschool.net




        On Dec 2, 2007, at 10:16 AM, Peter Gadzinski wrote:

        I agree that applying SNA and anthropological insights to the task of 
        sorting out actors in a real world environment is a step forward in 
        DOD thinking and represents the growing importance of thinking about 
        winning in "cognitive space" as well as establishing mastery in 
        physical space (sometimes, the two are contradictory) . Another 
        perspective on this effort arises from formal opposition to 
        participation on the part of some U.S. anthropologists as they 
        consider some of the HTM techniques to be unethical. Agree or not, 
        you have to conclude that applying SNA is not simply an academic 
        exercise.

        --- In ona-prac@yahoogroup s.com, "Michael Pastore" <bg_rva@...> wrote:
        >
        > Valdis,
        > 
        > I did see that article and I think it is a very good indicator of 
        > SNA's acceptance within the DOD. I wasn't aware of that effor nor 
        do 
        > I know what software they are using - wish I did though.
        > 
        > Mike
        > 
        > --- In ona-prac@yahoogroup s.com, Valdis Krebs <valdis@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Mike,
        > > 
        > > Have you seen the write-up on "human terrain teams" in WIRED?
        > > 
        > > Where you involved with this effort?
        > > 
        > > > Each team is getting a half-dozen laptops, a satellite dish 
        and 
        > > > software for social network analysis, so they can diagram how 
        all 
        > of 
        > > > the important players in an area are connected. Digital 
        > timelines 
        > > > will mark key cultural and political events. Mapmaking programs 
        > will 
        > > > plot out the economic, ethnic and tribal landscape.
        > > 
        > > http://tinyurl. com/28utez
        > > 
        > > A quick, easy and portable network recording device is a great 
        > idea... 
        > > something like a Palm or Treo or iPhone to quickly record: X is 
        > > connected to Y via work and Y and Z are brothers. Then dump all 
        > of 
        > > that into the SNA data base to see larger patterns.
        > > 
        > > Valdis
        > > 
        > > 
        > > 
        > > On Nov 30, 2007, at 11:30 AM, Michael Pastore wrote:
        > > 
        > > > Valdis,
        > > >
        > > > I could not agree with you more about the intel community no 
        being
        > > > more aware of what is already available commercially and in
        > > > academia. Working in a physically closed environment tends to 
        > close
        > > > the mind as well, (one of the reasons I had to leave).
        > > >
        > > > As for the meaning of "successful" , I must qualify my 
        perspective 
        > as
        > > > that of a software developer. Regarding the software products I
        > > > mentioned: I was responsible for many of the key ideas, the
        > > > architecture, look and feel, and technical leadership. So when 
        > the
        > > > products exceeded customer expectations, were delivered on 
        time, 
        > and
        > > > were still growing in use when I left: that is successful 
        > software.
        > > > My software-centric view of the world is another reason I want 
        to 
        > see
        > > > the bigger picture.
        > > >
        > > > Mike
        > > >
        > > > --- In ona-prac@yahoogroup s.com, Valdis Krebs <valdis@> wrote:
        > > >>
        > > >> Welcome Mike!
        > > >>
        > > >> I am somewhat surprised that you folks "behind the green door" 
        > did
        > > > not
        > > >> examine what was done commercially and in academia. It is easy
        > > > for
        > > >> you to see what we are doing... plenty of info available on 
        > plenty
        > > > of
        > > >> web sites and good ol' Google. Also, curious about what 
        defines 
        > a
        > > >> successful SNA app in the black world ... I realize you may 
        not 
        > be
        > > >> permitted to answer that question.
        > > >>
        > > >> Valdis
        > > >>
        > > >>
        > > >> On Nov 30, 2007, at 9:44 AM, Michael Pastore wrote:
        > > >>
        > > >>> Hello all,
        > > >>>
        > > >>> I am a newbie to ONA and would like to introduce myself.
        > > >>>
        > > >>> I am a sofware developer who recently came out of the "black
        > > > world"
        > > >>> where I created several successful SNA applications. Now 
        that I
        > > > am
        > > >>> free, I want to get an understanding of how SNA is used 
        outside
        > > > of the
        > > >>> intel space. I am looking forward to seeing the bigger 
        picture
        > > > of its
        > > >>> applicability and apply this to new network analysis software
        > > >>> projects.
        > > >>>
        > > >>> Thanks,
        > > >>>
        > > >>> Mike
        > > >>
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >


      • Rick Fowler
        Hi Everyone, I ve just joined the ONA-prac group and am thrilled to be here! I am a consultant in business/IT strategy and implementation (examples: enterprise
        Message 3 of 15 , Jan 7, 2008
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          Hi Everyone,

          I've just joined the ONA-prac group and am thrilled to be here!

          I am a consultant in business/IT strategy and implementation
          (examples: enterprise content management, knowldge management,
          interactive marketing, custom software engineering). I'm also an MBA
          student at the University of Chicago GSB.

          My interest in ONA/SNA comes from three places:

          1. I first learned about networks when I started a small business
          without having a network. That's difficult - I don't recommend
          it. :^) But I gained quite a bit of practical experience in
          developing professional networks as a result.

          2. I've done some SNA with UCINet and NetDraw for class projects and
          want to learn more.

          3. In my software engineering and project management roles, I have
          found that the challenges to successful projects are rarely
          technical - they involve culture, organization, communication, and
          group dynamics most of the time.

          So I've dedicated myself to learning how to improve organizational
          effectiveness, and I want to learn more about using ONA.
          Specifically, I'm looking for methods and tools for diagnostics and
          for approaches to developing solutions to organizational challenges.
          I look forward to learning as well as contributing as much as I can.

          Kind Regards,

          Rick Fowler

          efowler01@...
          rick.fowler@...
          rick.fowler@...
        • Valdis Krebs
          That is great Rick -- most I/T folks don t get this, and therefore dismiss it as unimportant. This is how I got into SNA also... many years ago I was a project
          Message 4 of 15 , Jan 7, 2008
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            That is great Rick -- most I/T folks don't get this, and therefore
            dismiss it as unimportant.

            This is how I got into SNA also... many years ago I was a project
            manager for various large HRIS/HRMS projects, and also saw the lack of
            attention to the "sociology" of the projects. Technology was well
            covered, sociology was ignored. From that experience, I developed
            InFlow so that I could be a better project manager. I left the PM
            world and have been doing full-time SNA/ONA since 1995 in orgs of all
            sizes.

            Glad you survived your entrepreneurial network lesson... many don't,
            and crawl back to jobs they don't like.

            Welcome aboard!

            Valdis Krebs
            http;//www.orgnet.com


            On Jan 7, 2008, at 10:50 AM, Rick Fowler wrote:

            > 3. In my software engineering and project management roles, I have
            > found that the challenges to successful projects are rarely
            > technical - they involve culture, organization, communication, and
            > group dynamics most of the time.
          • paul_kitko
            Hi Rick and welcome! Point # 3 in your list is very familiar to me. I too started in IT Project Management. I worked for two very large companies, GM and
            Message 5 of 15 , Jan 7, 2008
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              Hi Rick and welcome!

              Point # 3 in your list is very familiar to me. I too started in IT
              Project Management. I worked for two very large companies, GM and
              Chrysler, both of which have lumbering bureaucracies with a command
              and control mindset. As a result it was always challenging to achieve
              my project objectives.

              After much frustration I began delving into organizational behavior
              and complex adaptive systems which led me to ona-prac. Since then I
              have had the opportunity to conduct an ONA for Chrysler's IT group.

              I'm sure you and I are not alone. IT systems are dynamic and usually
              cross organizational boundaries. My guess is that most IT departments
              are not astute enough to address the technology-driven organizational
              challenges they face. "Agile Project Management" is a good method for
              navigating organizational friction while trying to achieve project
              objectives. You may also want to read up on "Wicked Problems"
              (http://cognexus.org/wpf/wickedproblems.pdf).

              Best of luck.

              Paul Kitko



              --- In ona-prac@yahoogroups.com, "Rick Fowler" <efowler01@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Everyone,
              >
              > I've just joined the ONA-prac group and am thrilled to be here!
              >
              > I am a consultant in business/IT strategy and implementation
              > (examples: enterprise content management, knowldge management,
              > interactive marketing, custom software engineering). I'm also an MBA
              > student at the University of Chicago GSB.
              >
              > My interest in ONA/SNA comes from three places:
              >
              > 1. I first learned about networks when I started a small business
              > without having a network. That's difficult - I don't recommend
              > it. :^) But I gained quite a bit of practical experience in
              > developing professional networks as a result.
              >
              > 2. I've done some SNA with UCINet and NetDraw for class projects and
              > want to learn more.
              >
              > 3. In my software engineering and project management roles, I have
              > found that the challenges to successful projects are rarely
              > technical - they involve culture, organization, communication, and
              > group dynamics most of the time.
              >
              > So I've dedicated myself to learning how to improve organizational
              > effectiveness, and I want to learn more about using ONA.
              > Specifically, I'm looking for methods and tools for diagnostics and
              > for approaches to developing solutions to organizational challenges.
              > I look forward to learning as well as contributing as much as I can.
              >
              > Kind Regards,
              >
              > Rick Fowler
              >
              > efowler01@...
              > rick.fowler@...
              > rick.fowler@...
              >
            • JT Maloney (jheuristic)
              Hi - Someone recommended joining. By way of introduction, I started in network analysis using GPSS on a 370/158 for response time engineering for a 8 building
              Message 6 of 15 , Nov 21, 2008
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                Hi –

                 

                Someone recommended joining. By way of introduction, I started in network analysis using GPSS on a 370/158 for response time engineering for a 8 building campus network of 3270s in Sunnyvale.  (If this means anything to you, then you will know the decade! They even had orchards back then!)

                 

                Fast forward to 2008, I co-founded and lead a company offing simple, easy-to-use, low-cost tools for SNA, ONA and value network analysis. It’s a ‘Load and Go’ configuration. I have a blog and also orchestrate popular events worldwide know as clusters.  

                 

                Company:      http://valuenetworks.com/

                 

                Offerings:      http://valuenetworks.com/public/item/209845    

                 

                Blog:               http://valuenetworks.com/public/item/218470  

                 

                Clusters:        http://www.vnclusters.com/ (value networks)

                                        http://www.pmcluster.com/ (collective intelligence)

                 

                Case Study:  http://tinyurl.com/44479x (Organizational example of ‘radical redesign’ with ValueNetworks.com for North America’s largest export.)

                 

                 

                Looking forward!

                 

                Cordially,

                 

                John

                 

                cid:image001.jpg@01C8EDA3.31CA1AC0

                 

                John Maloney

                john.maloney@... 

                 

                Sarah Jones, Administration

                sarah.jones@...
                Tel: 978-468-0267
                Fax: 206-984-2429

                 

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