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RE: [ona-prac] Framing a question about extent of internal vs. external relationships

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  • Patti Anklam
    Diana, These are very good suggestions. Thanks for taking the time to write this up, I think it s helpful for all the practitioners out here. Best, patti
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 26, 2007
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      Diana,

       

      These are very good suggestions.  Thanks for taking the time to write this up, I think it’s helpful for all the practitioners out here.

       

      Best,

       

      patti

       


      From: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ona-prac@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Diana Jones
      Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2007 8:06 PM
      To: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [ona-prac] Framing a question about extent of internal vs. external relationships

       

      Hi Patti, dpending on what you are trying to discover, one way you might consider approaching this survye would be to invite respondents to rank the groups in order of their importance to the respondent in assisting them doing their job well.  

       

      I have found time together sometime indicates importance of a relationship and many other times not. It often depends on the purpose of the relationship: information sharing, problem solving, opinion leaders, advice, trust, formal reporting, etc.

       

      I am currently working with a group assisting them look at their stakeholder relationships, and we are considering looking at inter group connections first, and we are rating the relationship as it currently is: 1 = working well, 2 = OK, 3 = needs development,

       

      and down the track we will map ego networks, so we have a map of the network of each individual within the broad range of possibilities of the stakeholder groups. This is a performance monitoring group as part of a public sector funding agency.

       

      This group is using the maps to look at the work they now need to undertake in developing relationships and changing the culture of the reporting relationship.

       

      another option is to take a future perspective and ask, for xyz to occur (e.g. greater collaboration across business units and with clients), who are three people you now need to develop a relationship with. this intervention stimulate new patterns and it is only sometimes relevant to produce maps. Hope some of this is helpful,

       

      regards, Diana Jones

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

      -----Original Message-----
      From: pattianklam [mailto:patti@ byeday.net]
      Sent: 8 January 2007 8:52 a.m.
      To: ona-prac@yahoogroup s.com
      Subject: [ona-prac] Framing a question about extent of internal vs. external relationships


      This may be a bit of an extension on the question of personal networks within group networks, but here I'm looking for specific advice about how to frame a survey question.

      The survey respondents themselves are all in the same organization, but I want to understand how much time people actually spend interacting with people outside their own groups. I have tried the following, with limited success:

      (Q)Of the time that you spend interacting with others, please indicate the relative percentage of your time you spend interacting with each of the following:

      Group

      Choices

      Other group A: 

       

      Other group B:

       

      Other group C:

       

      Outside company, with customers:

       

      Outside company, with research labs:

       

      where choices are percentage ranges, i.e. None   <10%,   10-30%,   30%-50%,   50%-75%,   75-80%,nbsp;  and 80-100%   I'm now trying to pick something less quantitative, with Lickert scale choices like: Not at all To a little extent Somewhat, etc. Anyone have any experiences with a question like this? thanks patti

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