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network density

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  • steffenmazanek
    Hello, I have questions on how to analyze and interpret the indicator network density. My data consists of two tables: people and relations. The relations
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 6, 2006
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      Hello,

      I have questions on how to analyze and interpret the indicator
      network density.

      My data consists of two tables: people and relations. The relations
      table links two people at a time, however it is not necessary, that
      the second person is in the people table. I have different kinds of
      relations, for example "plays with" and "is taught by" (the context
      is a gaming community :-)).

      Now I would like to interpret the network density. I have:
      - Number of signed-up players: 119
      - Maximum number of possible relations (119*(119-1)/2): 7021
      - Number of relations between signed-up players: 164
      - Network density (164/7021): 0.0233584959

      I have used the following assumptions:
      - neglect direction of relations (treat links as undirected)
      - neglect kind of relation (if there are more than one relation
      between two people count just one)
      - only count links within the population given by table people

      Now my questions:
      - Are my assumptions reasonable?
      - How can I interpret the network density? I have no case study
      for comparison.
      - What about the behavior of network density in case of
      incomplete data? I guess I can assume, that the people who
      signed up submitted correct and mostly complete data. But how
      should I deal with people who did not signed up? The community
      consists of nearly 2000 players. Is it reasonable to generalize
      the indicator network density for the whole community?

      I guess these questions can easily be conferred to e.g. business
      settings, so that they are interesting for you anyhow.

      Best regards,

      Steffen Mazanek

      http://informatik-praxis.blogspot.com
    • Mario Cezar Freitas
      Dear Steffen: See The stability of centrality measures when networks are sampled - Elizabeth Costenbader & Thomas W. Valente in Social Networks 25 (2003)
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 6, 2006
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        Dear Steffen:
         
        See " The stability of centrality measures when networks are sampled" -  Elizabeth Costenbader & Thomas W. Valente in Social Networks 25 (2003) 283–307 to help you.
         
         
        Mario Cezar Freitas
        tel: 3342-7181 mobil: 8114-2010
         
         


        De: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ona-prac@yahoogroups.com] Em nome de steffenmazanek
        Enviada em: domingo, 6 de agosto de 2006 09:26
        Para: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com
        Assunto: [ona-prac] network density

        Hello,

        I have questions on how to analyze and interpret the indicator
        network density.

        My data consists of two tables: people and relations. The relations
        table links two people at a time, however it is not necessary, that
        the second person is in the people table. I have different kinds of
        relations, for example "plays with" and "is taught by" (the context
        is a gaming community :-)).

        Now I would like to interpret the network density. I have:
        - Number of signed-up players: 119
        - Maximum number of possible relations (119*(119-1) /2): 7021
        - Number of relations between signed-up players: 164
        - Network density (164/7021): 0.0233584959

        I have used the following assumptions:
        - neglect direction of relations (treat links as undirected)
        - neglect kind of relation (if there are more than one relation
        between two people count just one)
        - only count links within the population given by table people

        Now my questions:
        - Are my assumptions reasonable?
        - How can I interpret the network density? I have no case study
        for comparison.
        - What about the behavior of network density in case of
        incomplete data? I guess I can assume, that the people who
        signed up submitted correct and mostly complete data. But how
        should I deal with people who did not signed up? The community
        consists of nearly 2000 players. Is it reasonable to generalize
        the indicator network density for the whole community?

        I guess these questions can easily be conferred to e.g. business
        settings, so that they are interesting for you anyhow.

        Best regards,

        Steffen Mazanek

        http://informatik- praxis.blogspot. com

      • steffenmazanek
        Dear Mario, thank you for the link. But I cannot see how network density is a centrality measure!? Ciao, Steffen http://informatik-praxis.blogspot.com
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 7, 2006
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          Dear Mario,

          thank you for the link. But I cannot see how network density is a
          centrality measure!?

          Ciao,
          Steffen

          http://informatik-praxis.blogspot.com

          --- In ona-prac@yahoogroups.com, "Mario Cezar Freitas" <mcezar@...> wrote:
          >
          > Dear Steffen:
          >
          > See " The stability of centrality measures when networks are sampled" -
          > Elizabeth Costenbader & Thomas W. Valente in Social Networks 25 (2003)
          > 283–307 to help you.
          >
          >
          > Mario Cezar Freitas
          > mcezar@...
          > tel: 3342-7181 mobil: 8114-2010
        • Cai W Kjaer
          Hi all, Just letting you in on a thing I discovered recently when I was playing around with my laptop...you may find this old new...in that case just ignore...
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 9, 2006
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            Hi all,

            Just letting you in on a thing I discovered recently when I was playing around with my laptop...you may find this old new...in that case just ignore...

            Problem: I am often trying to fit more than 100 nodes on a map, and when I choose to display node labels it becomes really difficult to get readable maps. There is a lot of overlap and I have spent a lot of time manually moving nodes around.

            Solution: I set my laptop in 'overhead projector mode' which for some reason allows me to select a screen resolution which is much higher (2048 x 1536) than the laptop allows in the normal display mode (1024 x 768). Then I redraw the map and save the graphic...magic...

            For those of you working on desktops this probably isn't a problem as may already have monitors which support a higher screen resolution anyway.

            I should say that I have an IBM laptop - I don't even know if this would work on other laptops...but hey - give it a go...

            Regards

            Cai

            _________________________________________________
            Cai Kjaer
            Principal Consultant, Consulting & Innovation Services
            Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC)
            26 Talavera Road, Macquarie Park, 2113 NSW
            Direct phone: +61 (0) 2 9034 2071 Mobile: +61 (0) 401 709 964
            Reception: +61 (0) 2 9034 3000 Fax: +61 (0) 2 9034 3999
            mailto:ckjaer2@... http://www.csc.com


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          • steffenmazanek
            Dear ona-practitioners, I would like to restate and extend my question on network density. What kinds of overall network indicators do you use and how do you
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 12, 2006
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              Dear ona-practitioners,

              I would like to restate and extend my question on network density.
              What kinds of overall network indicators do you use and how do you
              evaluate them? Do you know resources where I can find and study
              examples for comparison? I would be glad if you could share your
              experiences with me.

              Best regards,

              Steffen Mazanek

              http://informatik-praxis.blogspot.com

              --- In ona-prac@yahoogroups.com, "steffenmazanek" <smazanek@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello,
              >
              > I have questions on how to analyze and interpret the indicator
              > network density.
              >
              > My data consists of two tables: people and relations. The relations
              > table links two people at a time, however it is not necessary, that
              > the second person is in the people table. I have different kinds of
              > relations, for example "plays with" and "is taught by" (the context
              > is a gaming community :-)).
              >
              > Now I would like to interpret the network density. I have:
              > - Number of signed-up players: 119
              > - Maximum number of possible relations (119*(119-1)/2): 7021
              > - Number of relations between signed-up players: 164
              > - Network density (164/7021): 0.0233584959
              >
              > I have used the following assumptions:
              > - neglect direction of relations (treat links as undirected)
              > - neglect kind of relation (if there are more than one relation
              > between two people count just one)
              > - only count links within the population given by table people
              >
              > Now my questions:
              > - Are my assumptions reasonable?
              > - How can I interpret the network density? I have no case study
              > for comparison.
              > - What about the behavior of network density in case of
              > incomplete data? I guess I can assume, that the people who
              > signed up submitted correct and mostly complete data. But how
              > should I deal with people who did not signed up? The community
              > consists of nearly 2000 players. Is it reasonable to generalize
              > the indicator network density for the whole community?
              >
              > I guess these questions can easily be conferred to e.g. business
              > settings, so that they are interesting for you anyhow.
              >
              > Best regards,
              >
              > Steffen Mazanek
              >
              > http://informatik-praxis.blogspot.com
              >
            • Giancarlo Oriani
              Dear Steffen, your question is very interesting. We can use different kinds of overall network indicators, the most interesting of them being probably density,
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 28, 2006
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                Dear Steffen,
                your question is very interesting.
                We can use different kinds of overall network indicators, the most interesting of them being probably density, cohesion (average of distances between any pairs) and E/I.
                Each of them cannot be evaluated simply.
                Let's discuss just density.
                First of all, for valued relationhips, we need "some assumptions about the maximum possible value" (Scott, 2000). But we can have this assumption, for we are who define the response scale.
                Second, being people able to manage a limited numbers of ties, we expect density to decrease as network size is increasing. Generally, network density decreases if actor degrees remain unchanged.
                Consequently, it is very difficult to compare density indicators of different network. But we should try. Cross reminds that "when you interpret network density you must either relate groups of similar size or determine an ideal network pattern depending on the objectives of the group". I believe that also the latter one depends on information about similar networks.
                If you have a look at the case studies published on Cross's web site, you can see that the density target, based on his "Network Roundtable high performer benchmark database" is generally somewhere between 10 and 20. Unfortunately, you cannot use it, as he is not talking about gaming community.
                Ciao
                Giancarlo
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Saturday, August 12, 2006 5:32 PM
                Subject: [ona-prac] Re: network density

                Dear ona-practitioners,

                I would like to restate and extend my question on network density.
                What kinds of overall network indicators do you use and how do you
                evaluate them? Do you know resources where I can find and study
                examples for comparison? I would be glad if you could share your
                experiences with me.

                Best regards,

                Steffen Mazanek

                http://informatik- praxis.blogspot. com

                --- In ona-prac@yahoogroup s.com, "steffenmazanek" <smazanek@.. .> wrote:
                >
                > Hello,
                >
                > I have questions on how to analyze and interpret the indicator
                > network density.
                >
                > My data consists of two tables: people and relations. The relations
                > table links two people at a time, however it is not necessary, that
                > the second person is in the people table. I have different kinds of
                > relations, for example "plays with" and "is taught by" (the context
                > is a gaming community :-)).
                >
                > Now I would like to interpret the network density. I have:
                > - Number of signed-up players: 119
                > - Maximum number of possible relations (119*(119-1) /2): 7021
                > - Number of relations between signed-up players: 164
                > - Network density (164/7021): 0.0233584959
                >
                > I have used the following assumptions:
                > - neglect direction of relations (treat links as undirected)
                > - neglect kind of relation (if there are more than one relation
                > between two people count just one)
                > - only count links within the population given by table people
                >
                > Now my questions:
                > - Are my assumptions reasonable?
                > - How can I interpret the network density? I have no case study
                > for comparison.
                > - What about the behavior of network density in case of
                > incomplete data? I guess I can assume, that the people who
                > signed up submitted correct and mostly complete data. But how
                > should I deal with people who did not signed up? The community
                > consists of nearly 2000 players. Is it reasonable to generalize
                > the indicator network density for the whole community?
                >
                > I guess these questions can easily be conferred to e.g. business
                > settings, so that they are interesting for you anyhow.
                >
                > Best regards,
                >
                > Steffen Mazanek
                >
                > http://informatik- praxis.blogspot. com
                >

              • steffenmazanek
                Giancarlo, thank you for your elaborated response. I have to think about it and will follow up soon. Best regards, Steffen ... interesting of them being
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 30, 2006
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                  Giancarlo, thank you for your elaborated response. I have to think
                  about it and will follow up soon.

                  Best regards,
                  Steffen

                  --- In ona-prac@yahoogroups.com, "Giancarlo Oriani"
                  <giancarlo.oriani@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Dear Steffen,
                  > your question is very interesting.
                  > We can use different kinds of overall network indicators, the most
                  interesting of them being probably density, cohesion (average of
                  distances between any pairs) and E/I.
                  > Each of them cannot be evaluated simply.
                  > Let's discuss just density.
                  > First of all, for valued relationhips, we need "some assumptions
                  about the maximum possible value" (Scott, 2000). But we can have this
                  assumption, for we are who define the response scale.
                  > Second, being people able to manage a limited numbers of ties, we
                  expect density to decrease as network size is increasing. Generally,
                  network density decreases if actor degrees remain unchanged.
                  > Consequently, it is very difficult to compare density indicators of
                  different network. But we should try. Cross reminds that "when you
                  interpret network density you must either relate groups of similar
                  size or determine an ideal network pattern depending on the objectives
                  of the group". I believe that also the latter one depends on
                  information about similar networks.
                  > If you have a look at the case studies published on Cross's web
                  site, you can see that the density target, based on his "Network
                  Roundtable high performer benchmark database" is generally somewhere
                  between 10 and 20. Unfortunately, you cannot use it, as he is not
                  talking about gaming community.
                  > Ciao
                  > Giancarlo
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: steffenmazanek
                  > To: ona-prac@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Saturday, August 12, 2006 5:32 PM
                  > Subject: [ona-prac] Re: network density
                  >
                  >
                  > Dear ona-practitioners,
                  >
                  > I would like to restate and extend my question on network density.
                  > What kinds of overall network indicators do you use and how do you
                  > evaluate them? Do you know resources where I can find and study
                  > examples for comparison? I would be glad if you could share your
                  > experiences with me.
                  >
                  > Best regards,
                  >
                  > Steffen Mazanek
                  >
                  > http://informatik-praxis.blogspot.com
                  >
                  > --- In ona-prac@yahoogroups.com, "steffenmazanek" <smazanek@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Hello,
                  > >
                  > > I have questions on how to analyze and interpret the indicator
                  > > network density.
                  > >
                  > > My data consists of two tables: people and relations. The relations
                  > > table links two people at a time, however it is not necessary, that
                  > > the second person is in the people table. I have different kinds of
                  > > relations, for example "plays with" and "is taught by" (the context
                  > > is a gaming community :-)).
                  > >
                  > > Now I would like to interpret the network density. I have:
                  > > - Number of signed-up players: 119
                  > > - Maximum number of possible relations (119*(119-1)/2): 7021
                  > > - Number of relations between signed-up players: 164
                  > > - Network density (164/7021): 0.0233584959
                  > >
                  > > I have used the following assumptions:
                  > > - neglect direction of relations (treat links as undirected)
                  > > - neglect kind of relation (if there are more than one relation
                  > > between two people count just one)
                  > > - only count links within the population given by table people
                  > >
                  > > Now my questions:
                  > > - Are my assumptions reasonable?
                  > > - How can I interpret the network density? I have no case study
                  > > for comparison.
                  > > - What about the behavior of network density in case of
                  > > incomplete data? I guess I can assume, that the people who
                  > > signed up submitted correct and mostly complete data. But how
                  > > should I deal with people who did not signed up? The community
                  > > consists of nearly 2000 players. Is it reasonable to generalize
                  > > the indicator network density for the whole community?
                  > >
                  > > I guess these questions can easily be conferred to e.g. business
                  > > settings, so that they are interesting for you anyhow.
                  > >
                  > > Best regards,
                  > >
                  > > Steffen Mazanek
                  > >
                  > > http://informatik-praxis.blogspot.com
                  > >
                  >
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