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in 1863, Congress "thought they had" established a Bureau of Internal Revenue; but actually Congress did NOT: No Washington bureaucracy was created!!

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    ... From: Paul Andrew Mitchell To: SupremeLaw Sent: Monday, April 2, 2012 5:56 PM Subject: in 1863,
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 2, 2012
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      ----- Forwarded Message -----
      From: Paul Andrew Mitchell <supremelawfirm@...>
      To: SupremeLaw <supremelaw@...>
      Sent: Monday, April 2, 2012 5:56 PM
      Subject:
      in 1863, Congress "thought they had" established a Bureau of Internal Revenue;
      but actually Congress did NOT: No Washington bureaucracy was created!!

      http://www.supremelaw.org/cc/garfield/qwnotint.htm

           In 1972,  Internal Revenue Manual 1100 was published in both
      the  Federal Register and  Cumulative Bulletin  (see 37 Fed. Reg.
      20,960;   1972-2 Cum.  Bul. 836).   The  very first  page of  the
      Bulletin's "Statement of Organization and Functions" includes the
      following admission concerning the lawful creation of the IRS:
       
           (3) By  common parlance [sic] and understanding of the time,
           an office of the importance of the Office of Commissioner of
           Internal Revenue  was  a  bureau.    The  Secretary  of  the
           Treasury, in  his report  at the  close of the calendar year
           1862 stated  that "The  Bureau of  Internal Revenue has been
           organized under  the Action  of the last session ...."  Also
           it can  been seen  that Congress  intended  to  establish  a
           Bureau of  Internal Revenue,  or thought  they had, from the
           act of  March 3,  1863, in  which provision was made for the
           President to  appoint  with  Senate  confirmation  a  Deputy
           Commissioner of  Internal Revenue "who shall be charged with
           the duties  in the  bureau of  internal revenue  as  may  be
           prescribed by  the Secretary  of the  Treasury, or as may be
           require by  law,  and  who  shall  act  as  Commissioner  of
           Internal  Revenue  in  the  absence  of  that  officer,  and
           exercise the privilege of franking all letters and documents
           pertaining to  the office  of internal  revenue."   In other
           words, "the office of Internal Revenue,"  was the "Bureau of
           Internal Revenue,"  and
       the  act of  July 1,  1862,  is  the
           organic act of today's Internal Revenue Service.
       
                                                       [emphasis added]

      CHRYSLER CORP. v. BROWN, 441 U.S. 281 (1979)

      http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/scripts/getcase.pl?court=US&vol=441&invol=281#f23

      [ Footnote 23 ]
      There was virtually no Washington bureaucracy created by the Act of July 1, 1862, ch. 119, 12 Stat. 432,
      the statute to which the present Internal Revenue Service can be traced.


      --
      Sincerely yours,
      /s/ Paul Andrew Mitchell, B.A., M.S.
      Private Attorney General, 18 U.S.C. 1964
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