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Re: [OTRMP3] RE : Amos N Andy

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  • old_radios
    I also believe that a scene was removed from the variety show in the movie when shown on network television because by today s standards, it is considered
    Message 1 of 34 , Oct 5, 2011
      I also believe that a scene was removed from the variety show in the movie when shown on network television because by today's standards, it is considered unacceptable.

      > >don't you wish that a jack benny was around in 2011, to both >appreciate and comment on our modern world?

      I think he would be appalled at what's on TV and movies and in music lyrics. :-(


      --- In oldradioshowsonmp3@yahoogroups.com, californiacajun@... wrote:
      >
      > I think a sign things were changing were in the movies Holiday Inn in the 40s and White Christmas in the 50s. A number in blackface makeup was deliberately avoided.
      >
      > Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Susan <petpages@...>
      > Sender: oldradioshowsonmp3@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2011 07:26:05
      > To: oldradioshowsonmp3@yahoogroups.com<oldradioshowsonmp3@yahoogroups.com>
      > Reply-To: oldradioshowsonmp3@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [OTRMP3] RE : Amos N Andy
      >
      > I wasn't going to comment on the racial and ethnic prejudices that existed and were accepted by those who entertained and who were entertained.  We can't go back and change the shows so we have to accept them as the period in which they were conceived.
      >  
      > It's not for us to condemn. Benny did make some very tastless remarks but he wasn't alone. Uncomfortable as that may be, it is the way it was. I'm in my late sixties and remember not the 30's or even the 40' so much, but I certainly remember the way things were in the 50's and 60's. In many respects, we haven't moved on very far.
      >  
      > I don't think of Benny as a social commentator. I'm listening to The Bob Hope Show now from the early WWII years. His routines, even then, were more based on current events. More like one-liners and zingers like Carson, Letterman, and Leno. Benny didn't get the audience clapping after each joke. With him routine built to a conclusion.
      >  
      > Maybe more later, but I gotta get going this morning.
      >
      > From: Lonesome Lefty <lonesomelefty@...>
      > >To: oldradioshowsonmp3@yahoogroups.com
      > >Sent: Tuesday, October 4, 2011 10:50 PM
      > >Subject: Re: [OTRMP3] RE : Amos N Andy
      > >
      > >don't you wish that a jack benny was around in 2011, to both appreciate and comment on our modern world?
      > >
      > >--- On Tue, 10/4/11, Katje Koelsch <katjekoelsch@...> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >>From: Katje Koelsch <katjekoelsch@...>
      > >>Subject: Re: [OTRMP3] RE : Amos N Andy
      > >>To: "oldradioshowsonmp3@yahoogroups.com" <oldradioshowsonmp3@yahoogroups.com>
      > >>Received: Tuesday, October 4, 2011, 3:41 PM
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> 
      > >>I'm glad you brought that up Susan - I hadn't thought of it. Listening to old radio shows today there are moments that make me cringe - On Jack Benny specifically I have heard jokes about chinamen and laundry; the cops are always Irish; and I've certainly heard some jokes about the Rochester character that would cause an uproar in today's world. I think it is redeeming that Rochester often shows himself to be smarter or more clever than Jack. I also recall reading in Jack Benny's autobiography (that his daughter finished after his death) where he addressed this issue - "Today the world has changed so much and I have changed so much and black men and women have achieved dignity and standing in American life, that I would never have any character who was as broad and racially delineated along negative lines as was the old Rochester." He goes on from there to talk about the way America was back then, and how he changed the Rochester character when
      > civil rights started to take center stage after 1945, so that Rochester didn't perpetuate any of the stereotypes from that point forward. (From "Sunday Nights at Seven: The Jack Benny Story.")
      > >> 
      > >>From: Susan <petpages@...>
      > >>To: "oldradioshowsonmp3@yahoogroups.com" <oldradioshowsonmp3@yahoogroups.com>
      > >>Sent: Tuesday, October 4, 2011 2:03 PM
      > >>Subject: Re: [OTRMP3] RE : Amos N Andy
      > >>
      > >> 
      > >>I'm going to jump in here to mention that Dennis Day called his boss Mr. Benny and Mary was always Miss Livingston to Dennis.
      > >> 
      > >>grandmere
      > >>From: Joe Mackey <joemackey108@...>
      > >>>To: oldradioshowsonmp3@yahoogroups.com
      > >>>Sent: Sunday, October 2, 2011 10:56 AM
      > >>>Subject: Re: [OTRMP3] RE : Amos N Andy
      >  
      > Susan
      >
    • Joe Mackey
      Vince wrote -- ... Never lived in Chicago, but I have visited the town. ... No. Now I have to listen on my own time. :( I am now the supervisor of the
      Message 34 of 34 , Oct 7, 2011
        Vince wrote --

        > You live in WV, Joe? For some reason I thought you lived in Chicago!

        Never lived in Chicago, but I have visited the town.

        > Do you still have that night watchman job where you can listen to hours of OTR?

        No. Now I have to listen on my own time. :(
        I am now the supervisor of the parking enforcement office at Marshall
        University, a lieutenant in my security company and work days.
        Joe
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