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Re: [OTRMP3] Amos 'n' Andy

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  • Alan S
    There s always going to be some sub-culture we feel free to make fun of. Jeff Foxworthy said that certain parts of the US deducted 100 IQ points from him as
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 29, 2011
         There's always going to be some sub-culture we feel free to make fun of. Jeff Foxworthy said that certain parts of the US deducted 100 IQ points from him as soon as they heard his accent. You could easily argue that the original Amos and Andy radio show was racist as it consisted of two white performers imitating black men. That, in turn, allowed them to create a TV show where black people then imitated Amos and Andy.
       
       
       
       
       
       
      -------Original Message-------
       
      Date: 09/29/11 07:16:23
      Subject: Re: [OTRMP3] Amos 'n' Andy
       
       

      Vince wrote --

      > and well deserving the popularity they enjoyed. However, in today's
      > world this show has suffered criticism (both the radio and especially
      > the tv versions) because of perceived racial improprieties.

      One can just as easily make A'A "white" and its still just as funny.
      I recall in my college days (sometime around the end of the Dark
      Ages) friends were discussing racial questions. (We were all white,
      discussing the plight of others. And being college students we knew all
      the answers. I just wish I were that age again once in a while, since I
      had all the answers to life, which I seem to have forgotten over the
      years, which have been replaced with questions). Now I had heard only
      bits and pieces of the radio show but had watched the tv show before it
      was yanked off the air a few years before.
      I mentioned some show while Kingfish was involved in some scam of
      Andy. WELLLL... that caused fur to fly, the R word was tossed about,
      and the others were highly offended. I let it drop.
      Sometime later I recalled some funny incident on the show and told
      that story, but this time didn't mention where it was from, only "it was
      an old radio show I heard once". Now OTR was not as easily heard as
      now, mostly it was on some distant station late at night with lots of
      static.
      The guys thought this was hilarious and laughed and laughed at the
      antics.
      At the end of my story I said "that was from the Amos and Andy radio
      show". The silence from them was deafening.

      > that in the current pop culture there are many more demeaning racial
      > stereotypes being presented. I don't have much access to today's movie
      > and tv culture (my preference), but the little bit I have caught now and
      > again, seems laden with innuendo. Blacks are often portrayed as thugs,
      > drug dealers, etc.

      Agree.
      I do cringe once in a while the way blacks in general were presented
      on radio and the movies at the time.
      While Rochester usually gets the upper hand of Jack Benny, he is
      still always called Mr Benny, along with Mr/Miss used for the other cast
      members by Rochester, but they call each by their first name.
      In the mid-90s I found SPERDVAC and was raiding their library like
      crazy. A older black woman I worked with mentioned how much she enjoyed
      the radio show and if I had any of those. I had about 15-20 shows at
      the time and loaned her the tapes. She told me later they were as funny
      today as when she was a kid and her whole family listened to the show.
      And the tv show made its way to the net a few years ago and got a lot
      of them as well.
      Joe

       
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    • L. M. Withers
      One thing everyone misses about the radio version: except for Gosden and Correll, the majority of the rest of the cast was black.
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 29, 2011
        One thing everyone misses about the radio version: except for Gosden and Correll, the majority of the rest of the cast was black.
      • californiacajun@lusfiber.net
        For about the first 15 years or so Gosden and Correll were the only actors, playing various characters themselves. They always received some criticism. Other
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 29, 2011
          For about the first 15 years or so Gosden and Correll were the only actors, playing various characters themselves. They always received some criticism. Other actors weren't added until the series went to a half hour in 1943.

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