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The Electronic Library of the Future

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  • Dr Hank Heyman
    ... You aren t endorsing piracy are you? Primarily I mentioned this because I was attempting the argue that there are a number of sources for free audio
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 30, 2007
      Yesterday, Dan asked:

      > Besides the three sites cited above, many audio books are copied
      > and posted on usenet. These are ripped from copies purchased
      > or in some cases borrowed from libraries.

      "You aren't endorsing piracy are you?"

      Primarily I mentioned this because I was attempting the argue
      that there are a number of sources for free audio books, and
      there are also several sources for relatively inexpensive ones.

      So to me, audiobooksforfree is competing against a multitude
      of sources for my entertainment attention and many of them
      seem more appealing.

      As you seem to agree, when you wrote, "Honestly when it comes to ABFF
      they tend to be my last resort if I can't find a certain book elsewhere."

      I first became acquainted with the availability of binary content
      on usenet when I was invited to join a Yahoo group for comic books.

      After joining, I found the owner was sharing scans of old comics,
      mostly science fiction oriented DC titles that were some four
      decades old, such as The Flash, Green Lantern and Mystery in Space.

      As nostalgia, it was great to see these old books with such fond
      memories and to have them in my computer!

      The group, Just_DCU, disappeared under mysterious circumstances,
      but based on what the owner had told me, I embarked on a 'secret
      project' and discovered usenet and their world of scanning and
      posting comics.

      While it did appear that there was probably some infringment
      of copyright, it seemed like a sensible effort of fans to
      develop a large, distributed electronic library, which made
      hard to find material more readily available. Most of these
      comics aren't reprinted or available at most libraries.

      For some time now, I've been downloading scans of comics books,
      and got accustomed to it, with a liberal interpretation of
      the fair use doctrine.

      These aren't exact copies, but they are readable.

      Earlier this year, I came across a message which mentioned
      the availability of Star Wars music at another group,
      and then I learned of a group where soundtrack music was
      posted.

      At least some of the music I downloaded was music that I had
      already purchased (just as many of the comics scans were for
      ones that I had previously purchased the comics themselves),
      but for which I didn't have copies that I could play using
      the computer, e.g., copies on vinyl or cassette.

      To me, there didn't seem to be any harm in my downloading
      whatever might be posted, since none of it was anything
      I had been planning to purchase.

      (And based on the amount of material that I've seen posted
      over several months, I doubt anyone could afford to purchase
      ALL of it.)

      It was around this time that I finally took the plunge
      and learned to rip my own CDs, load them onto my computer,
      create playlists and have the computer as my own virtual
      radio station. I must say, this was something of a revolution
      for me, and that led to me no longer playing the original
      CDs or cassettes.

      I'm not adverse to paying for digital content. I have
      downloaded music from a paid service, eMusic, and purchased
      music and audio books (and regular books) on Amazon.com,
      eBay and elsewhere.

      However, I did eventually discover groups which posted
      audio books, and what can I say? It seemed too tempted
      not to occasionally download something that looked
      interesting.

      As you may know, the Writers Guild is currently on strike
      and one of the issues is that they want royalties on
      content distributed over the Internet,

      Personally I'd like to see an overhaul of the copyright
      laws so that everything is more equitable.

      As one member mentioned, they were able to 'borrow'
      an audio book from a library via digital download.

      If it was on one device, it was lost after an expiration
      period, while on another device, it stayed.

      People can and do borrow and read or listen to items
      for free and that includes libraries and friends.

      In this new age, it's so much easier for people to copy
      digital media.

      I'd much rather pay for a legitimate copy, which is why
      I subscribed to eMusic and alternatively have ordered
      through Amazon.com and eBay.

      If the distribution is done right (for example many TV
      shows can be viewed via the Internet for free), people
      will buy the content or make donations.

      Usenet is an excellent resource, but it's not like
      eMusic or Amazon, where you can look on a web site
      for whatever you are trying to find. When people
      can find what they actually want at a great price,
      then they will buy.

      Sincerely,

      Dr. Heyman
    • Prabhaker Reddy
      Hey, Doc Heyman I have been doing something very similar. I converted all of our cds to digital and have large collection in play lists. I also converted all
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 30, 2007
        Hey, Doc Heyman I have been doing something very similar. I converted all of our cds to digital and have large collection in play lists. I also converted all of the pictures collected over life time, have them on my screen saver. What an interesting time we are fortunate to live in. As far as copy write, I think they all become public property after fifty years and can be used without permission form the author. Correct me if I am wrong.

        Dr Hank Heyman <drhankh@...> wrote: Yesterday, Dan asked:

        > Besides the three sites cited above, many audio books are copied
        > and posted on usenet. These are ripped from copies purchased
        > or in some cases borrowed from libraries.

        "You aren't endorsing piracy are you?"

        Primarily I mentioned this because I was attempting the argue
        that there are a number of sources for free audio books, and
        there are also several sources for relatively inexpensive ones.

        So to me, audiobooksforfree is competing against a multitude
        of sources for my entertainment attention and many of them
        seem more appealing.

        As you seem to agree, when you wrote, "Honestly when it comes to ABFF
        they tend to be my last resort if I can't find a certain book elsewhere."

        I first became acquainted with the availability of binary content
        on usenet when I was invited to join a Yahoo group for comic books.

        After joining, I found the owner was sharing scans of old comics,
        mostly science fiction oriented DC titles that were some four
        decades old, such as The Flash, Green Lantern and Mystery in Space.

        As nostalgia, it was great to see these old books with such fond
        memories and to have them in my computer!

        The group, Just_DCU, disappeared under mysterious circumstances,
        but based on what the owner had told me, I embarked on a 'secret
        project' and discovered usenet and their world of scanning and
        posting comics.

        While it did appear that there was probably some infringment
        of copyright, it seemed like a sensible effort of fans to
        develop a large, distributed electronic library, which made
        hard to find material more readily available. Most of these
        comics aren't reprinted or available at most libraries.

        For some time now, I've been downloading scans of comics books,
        and got accustomed to it, with a liberal interpretation of
        the fair use doctrine.

        These aren't exact copies, but they are readable.

        Earlier this year, I came across a message which mentioned
        the availability of Star Wars music at another group,
        and then I learned of a group where soundtrack music was
        posted.

        At least some of the music I downloaded was music that I had
        already purchased (just as many of the comics scans were for
        ones that I had previously purchased the comics themselves),
        but for which I didn't have copies that I could play using
        the computer, e.g., copies on vinyl or cassette.

        To me, there didn't seem to be any harm in my downloading
        whatever might be posted, since none of it was anything
        I had been planning to purchase.

        (And based on the amount of material that I've seen posted
        over several months, I doubt anyone could afford to purchase
        ALL of it.)

        It was around this time that I finally took the plunge
        and learned to rip my own CDs, load them onto my computer,
        create playlists and have the computer as my own virtual
        radio station. I must say, this was something of a revolution
        for me, and that led to me no longer playing the original
        CDs or cassettes.

        I'm not adverse to paying for digital content. I have
        downloaded music from a paid service, eMusic, and purchased
        music and audio books (and regular books) on Amazon.com,
        eBay and elsewhere.

        However, I did eventually discover groups which posted
        audio books, and what can I say? It seemed too tempted
        not to occasionally download something that looked
        interesting.

        As you may know, the Writers Guild is currently on strike
        and one of the issues is that they want royalties on
        content distributed over the Internet,

        Personally I'd like to see an overhaul of the copyright
        laws so that everything is more equitable.

        As one member mentioned, they were able to 'borrow'
        an audio book from a library via digital download.

        If it was on one device, it was lost after an expiration
        period, while on another device, it stayed.

        People can and do borrow and read or listen to items
        for free and that includes libraries and friends.

        In this new age, it's so much easier for people to copy
        digital media.

        I'd much rather pay for a legitimate copy, which is why
        I subscribed to eMusic and alternatively have ordered
        through Amazon.com and eBay.

        If the distribution is done right (for example many TV
        shows can be viewed via the Internet for free), people
        will buy the content or make donations.

        Usenet is an excellent resource, but it's not like
        eMusic or Amazon, where you can look on a web site
        for whatever you are trying to find. When people
        can find what they actually want at a great price,
        then they will buy.

        Sincerely,

        Dr. Heyman






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