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Re: Red River Treasure

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  • Larry
    A bit of research on this story turns up more questions for me than answers. Research has a way of doing that. 1. I can t find record of Lewis Franklin
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 21, 2007
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      A bit of research on this story turns up more questions for me than
      answers. Research has a way of doing that.

      1. I can't find record of Lewis Franklin Palmore, U.S. Deputy Marshal
      in Indian Territory... Or any Palmore or Palmer in Indian Territory
      Law Enforcement. Not saying he isn't there, I just cant find him
      (except on a couple of treasure hunting sites, which seem to
      reference the same story).
      2. I did find someone bearing sons name... "on the 20th day of
      October, 1935, Frank Palmore did then and there kill and murder one
      Dewey Battles, by shooting him with a revolver." Garvin County.
      http://www.oscn.net/applications/oscn/DeliverDocument.asp?CiteID=52311
      might be the Frank mentioned, might not be... Age could be about
      right.
      3. Judge Isaac Parker only executed murderers and rapists, if the
      bank robbers murdered someone in Indian Territory they were fair game
      for the hanging judge.
      4. Hangings by Parker on or after the bank robbery date, listed
      below...
      July 25, 1894 Lewis Holder
      September 20, 1894 John Pointer
      March 17, 1896 Crawford Goldsby, alias Cherokee Bill
      April 30, 1896 Webber Isaacs, George Pierce, John Pierce
      July 1, 1896 Rufus Buck, Lewis Davis, Lucky Davis, Maoma July, Sam
      Sampson... Only hanging date after this was for rape.
      5. I can find no arrests of four bank robbers in Indian Territory in
      1894.
      6. Wouldn't it be unusual for Judge Parker to hear a case that
      happened in Texas, I think Parkers jurisdiction was limited to I.T.?
      7. The train came to Bowie two years before the bank robbery so it is
      very likely that telegraph communication was available to the Bowie
      Sheriff in 1894

      Course it could be a corrupted story... I found this account two
      years later than listed date. The robbery sounds quite similar.
      Except it was in Wichita Falls TX. Not far from Bowie, and it was the
      City National Bank, not First National Bank.
      http://ntxga.com/Memoirs_of_Linn_A_Boyd.html
      Q: Mr. Boyd, were you living here at the time of the City National
      Bank robbery?
      Mr. B: Yes, I was going to school on 13th street.
      Q: Can you tell us anything about it, the circumstances and results?
      Mr. B: I remember that on the day of the robbery, February 25, 1896,
      they let out school and we boys went to town. I saw somebody on a
      stretcher or cot who was being moved from the bank. That proved to be
      Mr. Frank Dorsey, who was Cashier at the bank, and had been shot and
      killed by one of the bank robbers.
      Q: Was P.P. Langford working for the bank at that time?
      Mr. B: Yes, he was shot in the hip. Mr. Frank B. Hardesty was Deputy
      Sheriff, and the bandits — Kid Lewis, about nineteen years old, and
      Foster Crawford, about thirty years old — shot Hardesty, but hit a
      big silver watch he had in his vest pocket and flattened it out. He
      showed us boys the watch.
      Q: After the bank robbery, the fellows escaped. Do you remember any
      of the details about that?
      Mr. B: They went down the east side of the Wichita River and, when
      they got three or four miles from town, down Turkey Bend, they
      crossed over to the north side of the river. The Rangers, headed by
      Captain McDonald, had been here for several days because of rumors
      that the bank was to be robbed, but, when nothing happened, they
      decided they were no longer needed. They were on the train leaving,
      when they got word of the robbery and, at Bowie, they caught the
      train coming back here.
      Horses were waiting for them here. They rode about eight miles from
      town and located the robbers in a thicket down by the river bridge. I
      don't know the particulars about how they captured them, but they
      brought them back, put them in jail and left town. That night the mob
      broke into the jail and got the robbers and lynched them on the big
      telephone pole at the corner of the City National Bank, Seventh and
      Ohio Streets. I didn't see them, but my brother went down and he saw
      them hanging on the telephone pole...

      Please don't think I am being critical of anyones work. I know much
      research goes into developing these. I am just trying to verify and
      pinpoint what might have been, and what might not be. Your posting
      got me to looking, first with google earth then mapquest trying to
      find a rock crossing, then realizing the river had changed course A
      LOT since 1894. I then sought to find official records of hangings,
      early court testimony, original reports by Palmore etc. It was then
      that I got curious about the validity of the story. I aint saying its
      false. I am saying I am having a difficult time finding validation.
      Course I am just getting started. If you have more info please
      advise. Hoping to contribute to the knowelge base.
      Larry

      --- In oklahomametaldetectingclub@yahoogroups.com, "beachhuntermike"
      <colleen2@...> wrote:
      >
      > Red River Treasure
      >
      >
      >
      > In 1894, the First National Bank in Bowie, Texas was robbed by four
      > men. After escaping with the $28,000 in stolen loot, they headed
      > north, stopping after a long day's ride on the south bank of the
      > flooded Red River on the Texas-Oklahoma border. In the meantime,
      > Lewis Palmore, a U.S. Deputy Marshal in Indian Territory
      (Oklahoma,)
      > received a telegram from the Bowie City Marshal, that the bandits
      > were headed his way.
      >
      >
      >
      > Realizing that the thieves would have to cross the flooded Red
      River
      > at Rock Crossing, he made preparations for a posse to be waiting
      the
      > next morning. When the robbers started their departure the next
      > day, they spied a posse quickly approaching from the south and
      > plunged into the river, swimming beside their horses. Little did
      > they realize that they were swimming directly into the hands of yet
      > another posse waiting for them on the other side of the river.
      > Palmore, along with two deputies, quickly arrested the four men,
      > finding in their saddlebags, some $18,000 in paper money. However,
      > also taken from the bank was $10,000 in $20 gold pieces. Of these,
      > not a single one was found.
      >
      > The outlaws were then taken to Fort Smith, Arkansas, where they
      were
      > sentenced to hang by Judge Isaac Parker . U.S. Deputy Marshal
      > Palmore was there for the execution and as one of the robbers
      waited
      > to for his execution, he told the lawman that they had hidden the
      > gold coins near their final campsite on the south bank of the Red
      > River. On his return to Oklahoma, Palmore searched the are over
      and
      > over looking for the gold coins, but was never able to find them.
      > Later, he told the tale to his son, who also searched the site with
      > a metal detector. Though Frank had the advantage of advanced
      > technology to help him in his search, he too was unsuccessful.
      >
      > The cache is said to be buried somewhere between the bridge on
      > Highway 81 and the mouth of the Little Wichita.
      >
    • larry barnes
      Lewis Franklin Palmore lived in Ada, Pontotoc County, in 1930. Source Citation: Year: 1930; Census Place: Ada, Pontotoc, Oklahoma; Roll: 1927; Page: 1B;
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 22, 2007
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        Lewis Franklin Palmore lived in Ada, Pontotoc County,
        in 1930. Source Citation: Year: 1930; Census Place:
        Ada, Pontotoc, Oklahoma; Roll: 1927; Page: 1B;
        Enumeration District: 2; Image: 33.0.

        --- Larry <lkillebrew1@...> wrote:

        > A bit of research on this story turns up more
        > questions for me than
        > answers. Research has a way of doing that.
        >
        > 1. I can't find record of Lewis Franklin Palmore,
        > U.S. Deputy Marshal
        > in Indian Territory... Or any Palmore or Palmer in
        > Indian Territory
        > Law Enforcement. Not saying he isn't there, I just
        > cant find him
        > (except on a couple of treasure hunting sites, which
        > seem to
        > reference the same story).
        > 2. I did find someone bearing sons name... "on the
        > 20th day of
        > October, 1935, Frank Palmore did then and there kill
        > and murder one
        > Dewey Battles, by shooting him with a revolver."
        > Garvin County.
        >
        http://www.oscn.net/applications/oscn/DeliverDocument.asp?CiteID=52311
        > might be the Frank mentioned, might not be... Age
        > could be about
        > right.
        > 3. Judge Isaac Parker only executed murderers and
        > rapists, if the
        > bank robbers murdered someone in Indian Territory
        > they were fair game
        > for the hanging judge.
        > 4. Hangings by Parker on or after the bank robbery
        > date, listed
        > below...
        > July 25, 1894 Lewis Holder
        > September 20, 1894 John Pointer
        > March 17, 1896 Crawford Goldsby, alias Cherokee Bill
        > April 30, 1896 Webber Isaacs, George Pierce, John
        > Pierce
        > July 1, 1896 Rufus Buck, Lewis Davis, Lucky Davis,
        > Maoma July, Sam
        > Sampson... Only hanging date after this was for
        > rape.
        > 5. I can find no arrests of four bank robbers in
        > Indian Territory in
        > 1894.
        > 6. Wouldn't it be unusual for Judge Parker to hear a
        > case that
        > happened in Texas, I think Parkers jurisdiction was
        > limited to I.T.?
        > 7. The train came to Bowie two years before the bank
        > robbery so it is
        > very likely that telegraph communication was
        > available to the Bowie
        > Sheriff in 1894
        >
        > Course it could be a corrupted story... I found this
        > account two
        > years later than listed date. The robbery sounds
        > quite similar.
        > Except it was in Wichita Falls TX. Not far from
        > Bowie, and it was the
        > City National Bank, not First National Bank.
        > http://ntxga.com/Memoirs_of_Linn_A_Boyd.html
        > Q: Mr. Boyd, were you living here at the time of the
        > City National
        > Bank robbery?
        > Mr. B: Yes, I was going to school on 13th street.
        > Q: Can you tell us anything about it, the
        > circumstances and results?
        > Mr. B: I remember that on the day of the robbery,
        > February 25, 1896,
        > they let out school and we boys went to town. I saw
        > somebody on a
        > stretcher or cot who was being moved from the bank.
        > That proved to be
        > Mr. Frank Dorsey, who was Cashier at the bank, and
        > had been shot and
        > killed by one of the bank robbers.
        > Q: Was P.P. Langford working for the bank at that
        > time?
        > Mr. B: Yes, he was shot in the hip. Mr. Frank B.
        > Hardesty was Deputy
        > Sheriff, and the bandits — Kid Lewis, about nineteen
        > years old, and
        > Foster Crawford, about thirty years old — shot
        > Hardesty, but hit a
        > big silver watch he had in his vest pocket and
        > flattened it out. He
        > showed us boys the watch.
        > Q: After the bank robbery, the fellows escaped. Do
        > you remember any
        > of the details about that?
        > Mr. B: They went down the east side of the Wichita
        > River and, when
        > they got three or four miles from town, down Turkey
        > Bend, they
        > crossed over to the north side of the river. The
        > Rangers, headed by
        > Captain McDonald, had been here for several days
        > because of rumors
        > that the bank was to be robbed, but, when nothing
        > happened, they
        > decided they were no longer needed. They were on the
        > train leaving,
        > when they got word of the robbery and, at Bowie,
        > they caught the
        > train coming back here.
        > Horses were waiting for them here. They rode about
        > eight miles from
        > town and located the robbers in a thicket down by
        > the river bridge. I
        > don't know the particulars about how they captured
        > them, but they
        > brought them back, put them in jail and left town.
        > That night the mob
        > broke into the jail and got the robbers and lynched
        > them on the big
        > telephone pole at the corner of the City National
        > Bank, Seventh and
        > Ohio Streets. I didn't see them, but my brother went
        > down and he saw
        > them hanging on the telephone pole...
        >
        > Please don't think I am being critical of anyones
        > work. I know much
        > research goes into developing these. I am just
        > trying to verify and
        > pinpoint what might have been, and what might not
        > be. Your posting
        > got me to looking, first with google earth then
        > mapquest trying to
        > find a rock crossing, then realizing the river had
        > changed course A
        > LOT since 1894. I then sought to find official
        > records of hangings,
        > early court testimony, original reports by Palmore
        > etc. It was then
        > that I got curious about the validity of the story.
        > I aint saying its
        > false. I am saying I am having a difficult time
        > finding validation.
        > Course I am just getting started. If you have more
        > info please
        > advise. Hoping to contribute to the knowelge base.
        > Larry
        >
        > --- In oklahomametaldetectingclub@yahoogroups.com,
        > "beachhuntermike"
        > <colleen2@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Red River Treasure
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > In 1894, the First National Bank in Bowie, Texas
        > was robbed by four
        > > men. After escaping with the $28,000 in stolen
        > loot, they headed
        > > north, stopping after a long day's ride on the
        > south bank of the
        > > flooded Red River on the Texas-Oklahoma border. In
        > the meantime,
        > > Lewis Palmore, a U.S. Deputy Marshal in Indian
        > Territory
        > (Oklahoma,)
        > > received a telegram from the Bowie City Marshal,
        > that the bandits
        > > were headed his way.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Realizing that the thieves would have to cross the
        > flooded Red
        > River
        > > at Rock Crossing, he made preparations for a posse
        > to be waiting
        > the
        > > next morning. When the robbers started their
        > departure the next
        > > day, they spied a posse quickly approaching from
        > the south and
        > > plunged into the river, swimming beside their
        > horses. Little did
        > > they realize that they were swimming directly into
        > the hands of yet
        > > another posse waiting for them on the other side
        > of the river.
        > > Palmore, along with two deputies, quickly arrested
        > the four men,
        > > finding in their saddlebags, some $18,000 in paper
        > money. However,
        > > also taken from the bank was $10,000 in $20 gold
        > pieces. Of these,
        > > not a single one was found.
        > >
        > > The outlaws were then taken to Fort Smith,
        > Arkansas, where they
        > were
        > > sentenced to hang by Judge Isaac Parker . U.S.
        > Deputy Marshal
        > > Palmore was there for the execution and as one of
        > the robbers
        > waited
        >
        === message truncated ===




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