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Tiny Microreactor For Biodiesel Production Could Aid Farmers

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  • Lucas Gonzalez
    http://che.oregonstate.edu/news/story/1695 Would this work with algae? Lucas ______________________________________________ LLama Gratis a cualquier PC del
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 1, 2006
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      http://che.oregonstate.edu/news/story/1695

      Would this work with algae?

      Lucas



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    • Thomas Robertson
      The larger question to ask here, and since I just joined the list, I ll ask it, is: What s different about algae oil? Is it simple to get pure oil from algae
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 1, 2006
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        The larger question to ask here, and since I just joined the list, I'll ask it, is:
        What's different about algae oil?  Is it simple to get pure oil from algae farms, or do you get an oil-algae sluge?  Also, if you do get pure oil, is there a major difference between it and soybean oil in terms of energy density, viscosity, etc...

        Lucas Gonzalez <lgs0a@...> wrote:
        http://che.oregonstate.edu/news/story/1695

        Would this work with algae?

        Lucas


                   
        ______________________________________________
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        Llamadas a fijos y m�viles desde 1 c�ntimo por minuto.
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        T.J. Robertson
        MicroCraft Corp. Raleigh, NC
        Cell phone - 919 280 2557


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      • Bill Cox
        The main difference with algae is that it potentially could generate all the oil we need without using too much land. The oil has to be processed somewhat to
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 1, 2006
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          The main difference with algae is that it potentially could generate all
          the oil we need without using too much land. The oil has to be
          processed somewhat to purify it, but that's not much different than oil
          from soybean used to create biodiesel today.

          It's basically the same as soybean oil, once it's purified.

          I have a different question: If the algae pond in Australia that kept
          it's algae strain pure using salt-water far from the ocean worked well
          for a year, why was it shut down? Was it able to turn a profit? If
          not, how close was it? What issues remain for that site?

          Thanks,
          Bill

          On Wed, 2006-03-01 at 06:44 -0800, Thomas Robertson wrote:
          > The larger question to ask here, and since I just joined the list,
          > I'll ask it, is:
          > What's different about algae oil? Is it simple to get pure oil from
          > algae farms, or do you get an oil-algae sluge? Also, if you do get
          > pure oil, is there a major difference between it and soybean oil in
          > terms of energy density, viscosity, etc...
          >
          > Lucas Gonzalez <lgs0a@...> wrote:
          > http://che.oregonstate.edu/news/story/1695
          >
          > Would this work with algae?
          >
          > Lucas
        • bob
          For those of you have read Clayton Christensen s Innovators Dilemma, you ll recognize that the real disruptive technology for biodiesel is the Straight
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 1, 2006
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            For those of you have read Clayton Christensen's Innovators Dilemma, you'll
            recognize that the real disruptive technology for biodiesel is the Straight
            Vegetable Oil (SVO) diesel engine.

            As such I view the need to convert vegetable/algae oil into biodiesel as a
            transition technology without a long term future.

            Having said this there are good reasons why this biodiesel transition period
            is important, however.

            Unlike SVO, biodiesel can run in existing diesel engines without requiring
            any modifications.

            Unlike SVO, biodiesel can be mixed with fossil diesel in any ratio without
            additional additives or mixing technologies.

            How long will the transition period be? Who knows.

            How long before algae farming is a significant biofuel player? Who knows.

            The Oil Drum website recently ran an excellent summary of Peak Oil:

            http://www.theoildrum.com/story/2006/3/1/3402/63420#more

            If you believe that data we are about to enter a chaotic transition period
            where biofuels in general and biodiesel in particular stand to play an
            increasingly significant role.

            bob


            On March 1, 2006 09:55 am, you wrote:
            > The main difference with algae is that it potentially could generate all
            > the oil we need without using too much land. The oil has to be
            > processed somewhat to purify it, but that's not much different than oil
            > from soybean used to create biodiesel today.
            >
            > It's basically the same as soybean oil, once it's purified.
            >
            > I have a different question: If the algae pond in Australia that kept
            > it's algae strain pure using salt-water far from the ocean worked well
            > for a year, why was it shut down? Was it able to turn a profit? If
            > not, how close was it? What issues remain for that site?
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Bill
            >
            > On Wed, 2006-03-01 at 06:44 -0800, Thomas Robertson wrote:
            > > The larger question to ask here, and since I just joined the list,
            > > I'll ask it, is:
            > > What's different about algae oil? Is it simple to get pure oil from
            > > algae farms, or do you get an oil-algae sluge? Also, if you do get
            > > pure oil, is there a major difference between it and soybean oil in
            > > terms of energy density, viscosity, etc...
            > >
            > > Lucas Gonzalez <lgs0a@...> wrote:
            > > http://che.oregonstate.edu/news/story/1695
            > >
            > > Would this work with algae?
            > >
            > > Lucas
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
          • Thomas Robertson
            Is there a specific website which keeps up with what we know about algae-oil so that the basics don t have to be asked repeatedly? Bill Cox
            Message 5 of 12 , Mar 1, 2006
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              Is there a specific website which keeps up with what we know about algae-oil so that the basics don't have to be asked repeatedly?

              Bill Cox <bill@...> wrote:
              The main difference with algae is that it potentially could generate all
              the oil we need without using too much land.  The oil has to be
              processed somewhat to purify it, but that's not much different than oil
              from soybean used to create biodiesel today.

              It's basically the same as soybean oil, once it's purified.

              I have a different question:  If the algae pond in Australia that kept
              it's algae strain pure using salt-water far from the ocean worked well
              for a year, why was it shut down?  Was it able to turn a profit?  If
              not, how close was it?  What issues remain for that site?

              Thanks,
              Bill

              On Wed, 2006-03-01 at 06:44 -0800, Thomas Robertson wrote:
              > The larger question to ask here, and since I just joined the list,
              > I'll ask it, is:
              > What's different about algae oil?  Is it simple to get pure oil from
              > algae farms, or do you get an oil-algae sluge?  Also, if you do get
              > pure oil, is there a major difference between it and soybean oil in
              > terms of energy density, viscosity, etc...
              >
              > Lucas Gonzalez <lgs0a@...> wrote:
              >         http://che.oregonstate.edu/news/story/1695
              >        
              >         Would this work with algae?
              >        
              >         Lucas




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              MicroCraft Corp. Raleigh, NC
              Cell phone - 919 280 2557


              Brings words and photos together (easily) with
              PhotoMail - it's free and works with Yahoo! Mail.

            • Bobby Yates Emory
              One of our members has started a wiki. Bobby ... -- Toward freedom, Bobby Yates Emory
              Message 6 of 12 , Mar 5, 2006
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                One of our members has started a wiki.
                 
                Bobby

                 
                On 3/1/06, Thomas Robertson <tjjuggle@...> wrote:
                Is there a specific website which keeps up with what we know about algae-oil so that the basics don't have to be asked repeatedly?

                Bill Cox < bill@...> wrote:
                The main difference with algae is that it potentially could generate all
                the oil we need without using too much land.  The oil has to be
                processed somewhat to purify it, but that's not much different than oil
                from soybean used to create biodiesel today.

                It's basically the same as soybean oil, once it's purified.

                I have a different question:  If the algae pond in Australia that kept
                it's algae strain pure using salt-water far from the ocean worked well
                for a year, why was it shut down?  Was it able to turn a profit?  If
                not, how close was it?  What issues remain for that site?

                Thanks,
                Bill

                On Wed, 2006-03-01 at 06:44 -0800, Thomas Robertson wrote:
                > The larger question to ask here, and since I just joined the list,
                > I'll ask it, is:
                > What's different about algae oil?  Is it simple to get pure oil from
                > algae farms, or do you get an oil-algae sluge?  Also, if you do get
                > pure oil, is there a major difference between it and soybean oil in
                > terms of energy density, viscosity, etc...
                >
                > Lucas Gonzalez < lgs0a@...> wrote:
                >         http://che.oregonstate.edu/news/story/1695
                >        
                >         Would this work with algae?
                >        
                >         Lucas




                SPONSORED LINKS
                Alpaca farming Agriculture business Agriculture commodity
                Agriculture jobs Agriculture jobs Organic farming



                T.J. Robertson
                MicroCraft Corp. Raleigh, NC
                Cell phone - 919 280 2557


                Brings words and photos together (easily) with
                PhotoMail - it's free and works with Yahoo! Mail.

                SPONSORED LINKS
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                --
                Toward freedom,

                Bobby Yates Emory
              • Bobby Yates Emory
                Bob, Yes - the only reason virgin soy is used for biodiesel is because it is not needed as an edible fat. At some point that will dry up and the price of soy
                Message 7 of 12 , Mar 6, 2006
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                  Bob,

                  Yes - the only reason virgin soy is used for biodiesel is because it
                  is not needed as an edible fat. At some point that will dry up and
                  the price of soy oil will go up rapidly.

                  Bobby

                  On 2/28/06, bob <fcsoft@...> wrote:
                  > You read something different from this article than I did.
                  >
                  > I took it as an indication that conventional biodiesel feedstocks are
                  > starting to get in short supply ... presumably because they are also used as
                  > edible fats.
                  >
                  > One of the best features of algae as a biodiesel feedstock in my view is
                  > that
                  > it doesn't compete with food growing in any way.
                  >
                  > bob
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On February 28, 2006 12:57 pm, you wrote:
                  > > Bob,
                  > >
                  > > I'm not sure this applies to us. They are talking about edible fats.
                  > > We hope that the oil from algae will be edible, but there has been no
                  > > testing of that idea.
                  > >
                  > > Bobby
                  > >
                  > > On 2/28/06, bob <fcsoft@...> wrote:
                  > > > "The growth in supply of oils and fats derived from crops such as soy
                  > and
                  > > > palms won't be enough to keep pace with accelerating demand, Thomas
                  > > > Mielke, an economist at Oil World research publication said.
                  > > >
                  > > > Stocks of the world's 17 main oils and fats will be 14.6 million metric
                  > > > tons by the end of the year, representing 10.2 percent of world
                  > > > consumption, he said in an interview Feb. 24 in Kuala Lumpur, while
                  > > > attending a conference. That compares with stocks of 14.5 million tons
                  > at
                  > > > the end of 2005, representing 10.7 percent of demand, Mielke said.
                  > > >
                  > > > ``Stocks are tightening every month, he said. ``There is a
                  > supply-demand
                  > > > deficit that is slowly worsening and the real impact is still to come. "
                  > > >
                  > > > from
                  > > >
                  > http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10001013&sid=aKVn6.VrmhEU&refer=co
                  > > >mmodity_futures
                  > > >
                  > > > bob
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                  >
                  > Visit your group "oil_from_algae" on the web.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On February 28, 2006 12:57 pm, you wrote:
                  > > Bob,
                  > >
                  > > I'm not sure this applies to us. They are talking about edible fats.
                  > > We hope that the oil from algae will be edible, but there has been no
                  > > testing of that idea.
                  > >
                  > > Bobby
                  > >
                  > > On 2/28/06, bob <fcsoft@...> wrote:
                  > > > "The growth in supply of oils and fats derived from crops such as soy
                  > and
                  > > > palms won't be enough to keep pace with accelerating demand, Thomas
                  > > > Mielke, an economist at Oil World research publication said.
                  > > >
                  > > > Stocks of the world's 17 main oils and fats will be 14.6 million metric
                  > > > tons by the end of the year, representing 10.2 percent of world
                  > > > consumption, he said in an interview Feb. 24 in Kuala Lumpur, while
                  > > > attending a conference. That compares with stocks of 14.5 million tons
                  > at
                  > > > the end of 2005, representing 10.7 percent of demand, Mielke said.
                  > > >
                  > > > ``Stocks are tightening every month, he said. ``There is a
                  > supply-demand
                  > > > deficit that is slowly worsening and the real impact is still to come. "
                  > > >
                  > > > from
                  > > >
                  > http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10001013&sid=aKVn6.VrmhEU&refer=co
                  > > >mmodity_futures
                  > > >
                  > > > bob
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                  >
                  > Visit your group "oil_from_algae" on the web.
                  >
                  > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > oil_from_algae-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  >
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  >


                  --
                  Toward freedom,

                  Bobby Yates Emory
                • Bobby Yates Emory
                  Bill. (I think I answereed this - but in case I didn t.) The algae growing in OZ was not a farm, it was a University research project. It was shut down
                  Message 8 of 12 , Mar 10, 2006
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                    Bill.
                     
                    (I think I answereed this - but in case I didn't.)
                     
                    The algae growing in OZ was not a farm, it was a University research project.  It was shut down because the research project was over.  It was not attempting to turn a profit - nothing was sold or used.  The author seemed very pleased - but his objective was remediation of waste water  - treating sewage - not making oil - the oil was a byproduct as far as he was concerned.
                     
                    Bobby 

                     
                    On 3/1/06, Bill Cox <bill@...> wrote:
                    The main difference with algae is that it potentially could generate all
                    the oil we need without using too much land.  The oil has to be
                    processed somewhat to purify it, but that's not much different than oil
                    from soybean used to create biodiesel today.

                    It's basically the same as soybean oil, once it's purified.

                    I have a different question:  If the algae pond in Australia that kept
                    it's algae strain pure using salt-water far from the ocean worked well
                    for a year, why was it shut down?  Was it able to turn a profit?  If
                    not, how close was it?  What issues remain for that site?

                    Thanks,
                     
                    Bill


                    On Wed, 2006-03-01 at 06:44 -0800, Thomas Robertson wrote:
                    > The larger question to ask here, and since I just joined the list,
                    > I'll ask it, is:
                    > What's different about algae oil?  Is it simple to get pure oil from
                    > algae farms, or do you get an oil-algae sluge?  Also, if you do get
                    > pure oil, is there a major difference between it and soybean oil in
                    > terms of energy density, viscosity, etc...
                    >
                    > Lucas Gonzalez < lgs0a@...> wrote:
                    >         http://che.oregonstate.edu/news/story/1695
                    >        
                    >         Would this work with algae?
                    >        
                    >         Lucas




                     
                    SPONSORED LINKS
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                    Agriculture jobs Agriculture jobs Organic farming


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                    --
                    Toward freedom,

                    Bobby Yates Emory
                  • Bobby Yates Emory
                    Thomas, Here is the URL for the wiki: http://www.phyco.org/phyco/index.php/Main_Page It is a good start on storing the information we need. You can add to it.
                    Message 9 of 12 , Mar 12, 2006
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                      Thomas,

                      Here is the URL for the wiki:

                      http://www.phyco.org/phyco/index.php/Main_Page

                      It is a good start on storing the information we need.  You can add to it.

                      Bobby

                      On 3/5/06, Bobby Yates Emory <liberty1@...> wrote:
                      One of our members has started a wiki.
                       
                      Bobby

                       
                      On 3/1/06, Thomas Robertson <tjjuggle@... > wrote:
                      Is there a specific website which keeps up with what we know about algae-oil so that the basics don't have to be asked repeatedly?

                      Bill Cox < bill@...> wrote:
                      The main difference with algae is that it potentially could generate all
                      the oil we need without using too much land.  The oil has to be
                      processed somewhat to purify it, but that's not much different than oil
                      from soybean used to create biodiesel today.

                      It's basically the same as soybean oil, once it's purified.

                      I have a different question:  If the algae pond in Australia that kept
                      it's algae strain pure using salt-water far from the ocean worked well
                      for a year, why was it shut down?  Was it able to turn a profit?  If
                      not, how close was it?  What issues remain for that site?

                      Thanks,
                      Bill

                      On Wed, 2006-03-01 at 06:44 -0800, Thomas Robertson wrote:
                      > The larger question to ask here, and since I just joined the list,
                      > I'll ask it, is:
                      > What's different about algae oil?  Is it simple to get pure oil from
                      > algae farms, or do you get an oil-algae sluge?  Also, if you do get
                      > pure oil, is there a major difference between it and soybean oil in
                      > terms of energy density, viscosity, etc...
                      >
                      > Lucas Gonzalez < lgs0a@...> wrote:
                      >         http://che.oregonstate.edu/news/story/1695
                      >        
                      >         Would this work with algae?
                      >        
                      >         Lucas




                      SPONSORED LINKS
                      Alpaca farmingAgriculture businessAgriculture commodity
                      Agriculture jobsAgriculture jobsOrganic farming



                      T.J. Robertson
                      MicroCraft Corp. Raleigh, NC
                      Cell phone - 919 280 2557


                      Brings words and photos together (easily) with
                      PhotoMail - it's free and works with Yahoo! Mail.

                      SPONSORED LINKS
                      Alpaca farmingAgriculture businessAgriculture commodity
                      Agriculture jobsAgriculture jobsOrganic farming


                      YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS






                      --
                      Toward freedom,

                      Bobby Yates Emory



                      --
                      Toward freedom,

                      Bobby Yates Emory
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