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Re: [oil_from_algae] Basics of Algae

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  • Graham Harris
    Guys, I think you confuse cell walls with cell membranes. Graha On Sun, 01 Jun 2008 14:50:48 +1200, Bobby Yates Emory ... -- Best Regards
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 1, 2008
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      Guys, I think you confuse cell walls with cell membranes.

      Graha

      On Sun, 01 Jun 2008 14:50:48 +1200, Bobby Yates Emory <liberty1@...>
      wrote:

      > Phil,
      >
      > I think you are correct that the cell walls are made up of lipids. But I
      > think the high oil species we are interested in will have oil inside the
      > cell, not part of the cell wall. Much to be learned.
      >
      > Since we will be trying to sell the algae cake to farmers and ranchers
      > for
      > animal feed, it will probably make it more worthwhile to have some oil
      > left
      > in it.
      >
      > The biodiesel brewers in the USA are having trouble getting feedstock
      > also.
      >
      > Your knowledge and experience should be helpful to us.
      >
      > Bobby
      >
      > On 5/31/08, Phil W> <heypiffen@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> Hi Bobby,
      >>
      >> I was thinking about reversing the osmotic pressure also, but I think we
      >> will find that this will disrupt the cell wall (and hence the cell
      >> itself)
      >> only, the osmotic pressure will then be removed by diffusion, and we
      >> will
      >> have intact cell walls that can be seperated from the solution (possibly
      >> strainable).
      >>
      >> To seperate the oil, what we need to do is to break the bonds of the
      >> lipid
      >> bilayer in the cell wall, where I imagine most of the oil by weight is
      >> actually held, and to do this I know chemicals that are reacting or
      >> acting
      >> as a catalyst will be more effective. I imagine that heat would have the
      >> same effect, but the energy involved may not make it viable. Heat or pH
      >> may
      >> turn a reagent into a catalyst under certain conditions, so this also
      >> needs
      >> to be explored. Chances are that such a method has been discovered as
      >> the
      >> result of an accident, but I would not know where to begin researching
      >> this
      >> across the various different accedemic fields.
      >>
      >> Enzymes would also be another eco-friendly method, but then the cost of
      >> production may be prohibitive. Firstly, specific enzymes that have the
      >> ability to produce the desired result of breaking the lipid bilayer
      >> must be
      >> identified. Isolating and production of the enzymes to be used may
      >> become
      >> easier with further research. Does anyone have any candidate enzymes?
      >>
      >> Currently I work in the waste oils industry in Australia, I know the
      >> value
      >> of biodiesel feedstocks, and am keen to keep my finger on the pulse of
      >> algae
      >> oil development (I have a science background with local contacts). A low
      >> cost and simplistic system would definately exist, we just have to
      >> identify
      >> the alternatives available!
      >> Cheers,
      >>
      >> Phil
      >>
      >> PS. I have said previously that I follow the developments on the ASX
      >> (Australian Stock Exchange) closely, and there are a few interesting
      >> things
      >> in the pipeline...
      >>
      >>
      >> 2008/5/31 Bobby Yates Emory <liberty1@...>:
      >>
      >>> MDD,
      >>>
      >>> Welcome to the group.
      >>>
      >>> There are many chemicals that can be used to extract oil. The standard
      >>> answer is hexane. Many other solvents can be used. Butanol is worth
      >>> looking at. I am hoping that we can reverse the osmotic pressure, so
      >>> the
      >>> answer may be salt or lack of salt.
      >>>
      >>> We are not involved with ethanol. It is brewed with a yeast. The
      >>> enzymes
      >>> are used to break down cellulosic material and then use a yeast to
      >>> ferment
      >>> the resulting sugars. They are secrets, I think.
      >>>
      >>> I hope you will grow algae for oil.
      >>>
      >>> Bobby
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> On 5/30/08, mddpastor <mddpastor@...> wrote:
      >>>>
      >>>> I was wondering if I could get some basic information as to what
      >>>> chemicals are utilized to extract the oils from algae. Also what
      >>>> enzyme
      >>>> is used in the production of Ethanol. I am completely new to this, but
      >>>> live in a climate with 330 days a year of sun so it makes sense to me.
      >>>> Thanks
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> --
      >>> Toward freedom,
      >>>
      >>> Bobby Yates Emory
      >>>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      >



      --
      Best Regards

      Graham
      New Zealand - timezone GMT+12
      Home: +64 9 631 7316
      Work: +64 9 633 0652
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