Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

The best way to harvest algae?

Expand Messages
  • Tom Catino
    the natural way of course...with krill krill should be much easier to harvest than algae because they are so much larger...the food of humpback whales...
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      the natural way of course...with krill
      krill should be much easier to harvest than algae because they are so
      much larger...the food of humpback whales...

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krill
      http://www.mercola.com/products/krill_oil.htm
    • Tom Catino
      The krill is a small shrimp-like marine crustacean. There are 85 types of krill present in the world s oceans, the most abundant is the Antarctic Krill
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        The krill is a small shrimp-like marine crustacean. There are 85
        types of krill present in the world's oceans, the most abundant is
        the Antarctic Krill (Euphasia Superba).

        They are eaten by fish, birds, and especially baleen (whale-bone)
        whales. Large whales, such as the humpback, can consume as much as 2
        tons of krill each day.

        The krill are of great importance as a source of protein, and are
        probably the most underused biomass on earth.

        PurKrill Oil provides a rich source of esterified astaxanthin
        extracted from Antarctic krill. Astaxanthin has a unique and superior
        antioxidant capacity. Astaxanthin has been scientifically proven 10
        times more effective as an antioxidant than carotene and 100-500
        times more effective than Vitamin E. Independent ORAC evaluation
        confirms that the antioxidant capacity of PurKrill Oil is more than
        300 times greater than that of measured Vitamin A and Vitamin E and
        48 times greater than Omega-3 18:12 fish oil.

        In human studies, PurKrill supplementation supported healthy joints,
        the heart, lipid and blood sugar levels, energy production, athletic
        performance, liver function, and eased women's PMS symptoms.


        --- In oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Catino"
        <tomcatino716@...> wrote:
        >
        > the natural way of course...with krill
        > krill should be much easier to harvest than algae because they are
        so
        > much larger...the food of humpback whales...
        >
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krill
        > http://www.mercola.com/products/krill_oil.htm
        >
      • Eugen Leitl
        ... Why do you think the food pyramid is called that? -- Eugen* Leitl leitl http://leitl.org
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          On Sat, Sep 01, 2007 at 03:50:44PM -0000, Tom Catino wrote:
          > the natural way of course...with krill
          > krill should be much easier to harvest than algae because they are so
          > much larger...the food of humpback whales...
          >
          > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krill
          > http://www.mercola.com/products/krill_oil.htm

          Why do you think the food pyramid is called that?

          --
          Eugen* Leitl <a href="http://leitl.org">leitl</a> http://leitl.org
          ______________________________________________________________
          ICBM: 48.07100, 11.36820 http://www.ativel.com http://postbiota.org
          8B29F6BE: 099D 78BA 2FD3 B014 B08A 7779 75B0 2443 8B29 F6BE
        • Bobby Yates Emory
          Tom, We cannot afford the inefficiencies. Biological processes are notoriously inefficient. I doubt if we would get 10% of the oil from the algae into our
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 1, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Tom,

            We cannot afford the inefficiencies.  Biological processes are notoriously inefficient.  I doubt if we would get 10% of the oil from the algae into our tank.

            Someone should test this, because the usual efficiencies can sometimes be really different, but we need to keep working on other processes.

            Bobby

            On 9/1/07, Tom Catino <tomcatino716@...> wrote:

            The krill is a small shrimp-like marine crustacean. There are 85
            types of krill present in the world's oceans, the most abundant is
            the Antarctic Krill (Euphasia Superba).

            They are eaten by fish, birds, and especially baleen (whale-bone)
            whales. Large whales, such as the humpback, can consume as much as 2
            tons of krill each day.

            The krill are of great importance as a source of protein, and are
            probably the most underused biomass on earth.

            PurKrill Oil provides a rich source of esterified astaxanthin
            extracted from Antarctic krill. Astaxanthin has a unique and superior
            antioxidant capacity. Astaxanthin has been scientifically proven 10
            times more effective as an antioxidant than carotene and 100-500
            times more effective than Vitamin E. Independent ORAC evaluation
            confirms that the antioxidant capacity of PurKrill Oil is more than
            300 times greater than that of measured Vitamin A and Vitamin E and
            48 times greater than Omega-3 18:12 fish oil.

            In human studies, PurKrill supplementation supported healthy joints,
            the heart, lipid and blood sugar levels, energy production, athletic
            performance, liver function, and eased women's PMS symptoms.

            --- In oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Catino"
            <tomcatino716@...> wrote:
            >
            > the natural way of course...with krill
            > krill should be much easier to harvest than algae because they are
            so
            > much larger...the food of humpback whales...
            >
            > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krill
            > http://www.mercola.com/products/krill_oil.htm
            >




            --
            Toward freedom,

            Bobby Yates Emory
          • David Miller
            ... We should get in the range of 10-20% of the original sunlights energy in the form of algal biomass. If conversion to krill oil is 10% we re down to 1-2%.
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 1, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Bobby Yates Emory wrote:
              > Tom,
              >
              > We cannot afford the inefficiencies. Biological processes are
              > notoriously inefficient. I doubt if we would get 10% of the oil from
              > the algae into our tank.

              We should get in the range of 10-20% of the original sunlights energy in
              the form of algal biomass. If conversion to krill oil is 10% we're down
              to 1-2%.

              That's only going to pay off if we close off major natural shallow
              bodies of water. San Francisco harbor, anyone?

              > Someone should test this, because the usual efficiencies can sometimes
              > be really different, but we need to keep working on other processes.

              Absolutely.

              --- David
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.