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Kelvin power station to house biodiesel plant

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  • Tom Catino
    Kelvin power station to house biodiesel plant Kelvin power station to house biodiesel plant Biofuels producer De Beers Fuel, which hopes to be the first in the
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 1, 2006
      Kelvin power station to house biodiesel plant

      Kelvin power station to house biodiesel plant Biofuels producer De
      Beers Fuel, which hopes to be the first in the world to
      commercialise algae biofuel production, announced that its first
      engineering scale plant will be located at Kelvin power station, on
      the East Rand.

      In an exclusive interview with Engineering News Online, CEO Frik De
      Beer said on Thursday that the engineering scale plant, which would
      cost about R350 000 an acre to build, was scheduled for
      commissioning sometime between April and May.

      He pointed out that the plant would be built over two-and-a-half
      acres at a cost of R875 000.

      He explained that the company would start with earthworks
      preparation and plant erection (which would house algae growth
      tubes) by the middle of January.

      De Beers had signed a 15-year contract with Kelvin power station on
      November 15.

      "The control unit is already under construction by Green Fields
      Technologies in the US and should be here by February," he reported.

      Commercial roll-out to algae farms is expected soon after
      commissioning.

      Meanwhile, De Beers reported that it was looking to establish its
      algae biofuels plants close to high carbon dioxide emitting
      companies, such as petrochemicals giant Sasol and State-owned power
      utility Eskom.

      "We are in talks with Eskom, steel factories and cement factories,"
      De Beers noted, adding that the company had chosen to approach
      Kelvin power station because it was privately owned and thus took
      less discussion time. In addition to Kelvin power station benefiting
      from the elimination of carbon dioxide emissions, the dried algae
      would be used as stock feed to supplement the coal used at the power
      station, at a saving of up to 40% on coal consumption, De Beers said.

      He also revealed that the Kelvin power station plant would
      incorporate the new reactor, which would decrease process time from
      one hour fifty-five minutes to only five minutes.

      "The new reactor has a shorter process time, has a better control
      system and provides consistency," De Beers highlighted, adding that
      the reactor was currently being connected at its pilot plant in
      Naboomspruit.
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