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Algae Oil Refining

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  • diresire
    I have found tons of info on Algae growth and its feasability as an alternative fuel but does anyone have any info or reading recommendations on processing
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 5, 2006
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      I have found tons of info on Algae growth and its feasability as an
      alternative fuel but does anyone have any info or reading
      recommendations on processing 'Raw Algae' into oil? Any feedback would
      be greatly appreciated. I'm also looking for equipment to turn algae
      into base oil. Thanks
    • stone cold
      Dear sir , u will the reply very soon god bless u diresire wrote: I have found tons of info on Algae growth and its feasability as an
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 5, 2006
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        Dear sir ,
        u will the reply very soon god bless u
        diresire <demarco135@...> wrote:
        I have found tons of info on Algae growth and its feasability as an
        alternative fuel but does anyone have any info or reading
        recommendations on processing 'Raw Algae' into oil? Any feedback would
        be greatly appreciated. I'm also looking for equipment to turn algae
        into base oil. Thanks


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      • Bobby Yates Emory
        Diresire, That is what this group is about - discovering how to grow algae, extract the oil, process the oil, and use it in vehicles and for heating. We do not
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 5, 2006
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          Diresire,

          That is what this group is about - discovering how to grow algae, extract the oil, process the oil, and use it in vehicles and for heating.

          We do not have a canned solution for you.

          We invite you to help us develop the answers.

          Bobby

          On 6/6/06, diresire <demarco135@...> wrote:

          I have found tons of info on Algae growth and its feasability as an
          alternative fuel but does anyone have any info or reading
          recommendations on processing 'Raw Algae' into oil? Any feedback would
          be greatly appreciated. I'm also looking for equipment to turn algae
          into base oil. Thanks




          --
          Toward freedom,

          Bobby Yates Emory
        • Bobby Yates Emory
          Stone, I have replied. Bobby ... -- Toward freedom, Bobby Yates Emory
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 5, 2006
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            Stone,

            I have replied.

            Bobby

            On 6/6/06, stone cold <stonejascold316@...> wrote:

             
            Dear sir ,
            u will the reply very soon god bless u
            diresire < demarco135@...> wrote:
            I have found tons of info on Algae growth and its feasability as an
            alternative fuel but does anyone have any info or reading
            recommendations on processing 'Raw Algae' into oil? Any feedback would
            be greatly appreciated. I'm also looking for equipment to turn algae
            into base oil. Thanks


            Send instant messages to your online friends http://in.messenger.yahoo.com

            Stay connected with your friends even when away from PC. Link: http://in.mobile.yahoo.com/new/messenger/




            --
            Toward freedom,

            Bobby Yates Emory
          • biogasoline
            The processes I am working with (in the design phase), involve direct fermentation of still-wet algae, to extract the oils along with fermentable alcohols. The
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 7, 2006
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              The processes I am working with (in the design phase), involve direct
              fermentation of still-wet algae, to extract the oils along with
              fermentable alcohols. The processes are solar driven, and extra
              electricity is made directly with thermophotovoltaic systems from the
              otherwise wasted infrared heat. The reject heat from the
              themophotovoltaic arrays, can be further used, for other purposes,
              such as spectral conversion (to grow-light), refinery process heat ,
              or for catalytically stitching two ethanol molecules together, to
              make more biomass Butanol biogasoline (forming), or for reacting
              glycerol, to make propylene glycol antifreeze, or for creating
              methanol, from fermentation reactor gasses.
              Every BTU should be put to use, but there are a LOT of extra
              thermal BTUs collected, in the Stationary Inflatable Solar
              Concentrator Arrays/Solar Receiver/Spectral Converters.
              Rather than directly drying microalgae or nanoalgae, that reject heat
              can be used to dry the high protein mash, that comes out of the
              fermentation reactors, after the oil laden solvents are extracted.
              First the mash is washed, with a final rinse, of oil-free biomass
              Butanol biogasoline, to remove the last traces of oils.
              Then the solvent wash is recycled, to the integrated refinery oil
              separator, and the protein mash, then goes to the enclosed solar
              dryer. The biomass Butanol biogasoline-water azeotrope vapors, are
              then cold trapped, to eliminate biogasoline emissions, and to
              recapture, the last bit of the oil extraction solvent.
              The azeotrope is then sent to the biomass Butanol biogasoline drying
              membranes separator, for decanting and final water removal.
              The reject heat from the solar collectors, that is not otherwise
              recycled, can thus be used to produce a dry, oil-free protein cake
              that is also rich in phosphorous and nitrogen. This can be directly
              fed to animals.
              If desired , before drying, the phosphorous and nitrogen can be
              separated from the protein cake, to produce nitrogen fertilizer,
              phosphorous fertilizer, and pure oil-free protein cake for food use.
              The final solar powered drying step can also dry these three value-
              added resale commodities separately.
              © 2006 Patrick Ward
              7 June 2006

              With Best regards
              FREE ENERGY
              Patrick Ward
              Richmond VA
              fossilfreedomATyahoo.com fossilfreedom@...
              fossilfreedomATyahoogroups.com fossilfreedom@yahoogroups.com
              biogasolineATyahoo.com biogasoline@...
              biogasolineATyahoogroups.com biogasoline@yahoogroups.com

              http://www.fossilfreedom.com

              http://www.fossilfreedom.com
              --- In oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com, "diresire" <demarco135@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > I have found tons of info on Algae growth and its feasability as an
              > alternative fuel but does anyone have any info or reading
              > recommendations on processing 'Raw Algae' into oil? Any feedback
              would
              > be greatly appreciated. I'm also looking for equipment to turn
              algae
              > into base oil. Thanks
              >
            • Manoj Mehta
              hi we r working on biodiesel n herbal plants diresire wrote: I have found tons of info on Algae growth and its feasability as an
              Message 6 of 9 , Jun 8, 2006
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                hi
                we r working on biodiesel n herbal plants

                diresire <demarco135@...> wrote:
                I have found tons of info on Algae growth and its feasability as an
                alternative fuel but does anyone have any info or reading
                recommendations on processing 'Raw Algae' into oil? Any feedback would
                be greatly appreciated. I'm also looking for equipment to turn algae
                into base oil. Thanks


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              • Daniel Halsey
                Fundamentally, the algae is dried and pressed to extract the oil. The water needs to be removed and the cells broken to release the oil. Using a centrifuge for
                Message 7 of 9 , Jun 8, 2006
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                  Fundamentally, the algae is dried and pressed to extract the oil.
                  The water needs to be removed and the cells broken to release the oil.
                  Using a centrifuge for lab tests, hydraulic presses for forced
                  extraction, or even cooking and distilling the algae for oils.
                  I myself am looking for passive practices that use no or little energy
                  in the process.
                  Getting 100% of the oil out of a porous material is the challenge.
                  Like squeezing a very tight sponge.

                  That is why we have to "cook" corn, beans, and grasses. The oil is
                  locked up in cells of an organic matrix that needs to be broken.

                  Processing the oil afterwards is elementary and covered extensively
                  elsewhere in the guise of biodiesel. I believe breaking the source
                  code of efficient production and extraction is the topic here.

                  On that note, high overhead complex systems of tubes and pumps not
                  piggy backed on another already working system, such as a power plant,
                  are in my opinion wasting valuable resources. Keeping it simple and
                  less "entertaining" will reduce entropy and front and back end costs.
                  Unless we want to continuously run the circuitous paradigm of
                  reinvention and proprietary systems, this new technology should be
                  stacked on another working system the produces as waste what this
                  system uses as a resource. Stacking functions and layering
                  efficiencies, as stated in Permaculture principles, would be well used
                  here from the start.
                • Bobby Yates Emory
                  Daniel, It is not necessary to dry the algae before extracting the oil. Bobby ... -- Toward freedom, Bobby Yates Emory
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jun 8, 2006
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                    Daniel,

                    It is not necessary to dry the algae before extracting the oil.

                    Bobby

                    On 6/8/06, Daniel Halsey <dhalsey@...> wrote:

                    Fundamentally, the algae is dried and pressed to extract the oil.
                    The water needs to be removed and the cells broken to release the oil.
                    Using a centrifuge for lab tests, hydraulic presses for forced
                    extraction, or even cooking and distilling the algae for oils.
                    I myself am looking for passive practices that use no or little energy
                    in the process.
                    Getting 100% of the oil out of a porous material is the challenge.
                    Like squeezing a very tight sponge.

                    That is why we have to "cook" corn, beans, and grasses. The oil is
                    locked up in cells of an organic matrix that needs to be broken.

                    Processing the oil afterwards is elementary and covered extensively
                    elsewhere in the guise of biodiesel. I believe breaking the source
                    code of efficient production and extraction is the topic here.

                    On that note, high overhead complex systems of tubes and pumps not
                    piggy backed on another already working system, such as a power plant,
                    are in my opinion wasting valuable resources. Keeping it simple and
                    less "entertaining" will reduce entropy and front and back end costs.
                    Unless we want to continuously run the circuitous paradigm of
                    reinvention and proprietary systems, this new technology should be
                    stacked on another working system the produces as waste what this
                    system uses as a resource. Stacking functions and layering
                    efficiencies, as stated in Permaculture principles, would be well used
                    here from the start.




                    --
                    Toward freedom,

                    Bobby Yates Emory
                  • Paul Niznik
                    It is not necesary to dry the algae. If you are looking to investigate an low energy option for extraction, why not experiment with the osmossis-bust approach?
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jun 9, 2006
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                      It is not necesary to dry the algae.
                       
                      If you are looking to investigate an low energy option for extraction, why not experiment with the osmossis-bust approach? Some have suggested that you take your slurry of (persumably) salt water and algae and possible increase the salinity (pour in salt until it does not evaporate). Then take significant (3 or 4? times your slurry) amounts of fresh water and add to the mix and see if you can burst the cells as they rapidly over-absorb the water. The cell contents would hopefully settle out...with the oil rising. Then it can be seperated for further cleaning and processing.
                       
                      While this potential method is lower in energy use, it would become water-use intensive on a large scale. Probably not a pratical industrieal method.
                       
                      Try this with a test batch, we know it works on many species...but algae are tough stuff! Tell us how it works out
                       
                      Paul N
                       
                       
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