Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Microscreening

Expand Messages
  • Ron Brown
         Hello, All,        My 280-mesh silkscreen frame arrived.  The screen holds water, but when I squeegeed the algae culture straight out of the
    Message 1 of 15 , May 3 3:02 PM
    • 1 Attachment
    • 17 KB
         Hello, All,
     
         My 280-mesh silkscreen frame arrived.  The screen holds water, but when I squeegeed the algae culture straight out of the pond, I was unable to concentrate or dewater it.
     
         Apparently Harshith was right about the flocculation.  Upon reconsidering what the video shows, I realize that the stuff they are squeegeeing is very thick.
     
         So, I put 5 gallons of algae culture in a bucket and added 200 grams of alum, after dissolving the alum in a saucepan of hot water.  I dumped it in and stirred it thoroughly.  Nothing happened.  I found a reference that said that the pH has to be right around 7.0 for flocculating with alum, so I added a cup of muriatic acid and waited a couple of hours.  I was still unable to scoop anything out with my strainer, so I transferred the 5 gallons to my settling tank, and added another 10 gallons of algae culture.  While dumping the 5 gallons in, I noticed that there had already been some settling of the algae.  I added 3 more cups of acid, and left it to settle overnight.
     
         I wasn't able to check it the next day, but the day after, I drained five gallons from the bottom of the settling tank.  The first gallon was very dark, and the other four were very light, so, it looks like the alum finally accomplished something. 
     
         I poured the first gallon onto the screen and squeegeed it.  What you see in "Harvest.jpg" Is what I was left with after processing this gallon of settled culture.
     
         I took some algae paste that I had extracted using the cream separator, and added distilled water back to it, then put it onto the screen.  I was able to squeegee it, and its consistency was closer to what appeared in the video, but
    the squeegee pushed some of the paste through the screen to the other side.
     
         My conclusion is that microscreening will work, but attention needs to be given to the pore size and the algae size.  Flocculation can be used to make it possible to concentrate a relatively small algae using a relatively large pore size.
     
         I was trying this with Chlorella, which is pretty small.  An alternate strategy might be to go back to polyculture of Chlorella and Euglena, because Euglena is a bigger organism.
     
     
    ---rsb
    Ron Brown
    03MAY2012
     
  • harshith sirigeri
    Hello Ron, 200 grams for 5 gallons!? Ideally 0.5 grams of alum should have been sufficient for this quantity, but add around a gram at max. Its usually 10 to
    Message 2 of 15 , May 4 7:27 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello Ron,

      200 grams for 5 gallons!? Ideally 0.5 grams of alum should have been sufficient for this quantity, but add around a gram at max. Its usually 10 to 20% of the algae you expect to get from that solution. 

      Just add the alum, stir for a minute or 2 and then leave for about 12 mins. 
       
      Regards
      Harshith Sirigeri
      Founder, Green Bubble

      #121, 1st main, 9th cross, 6th phase, W.O.C Road, Basaveshwaranagar, Bangalore-560010 Tel: +919886692494, 080-23386734 www.greenbubble.co.in 


      From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
      To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, May 4, 2012 3:32 AM
      Subject: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening [1 Attachment]

       
      [Attachment(s) from Ron Brown included below]
           Hello, All,
       
           My 280-mesh silkscreen frame arrived.  The screen holds water, but when I squeegeed the algae culture straight out of the pond, I was unable to concentrate or dewater it.
       
           Apparently Harshith was right about the flocculation.  Upon reconsidering what the video shows, I realize that the stuff they are squeegeeing is very thick.
       
           So, I put 5 gallons of algae culture in a bucket and added 200 grams of alum, after dissolving the alum in a saucepan of hot water.  I dumped it in and stirred it thoroughly.  Nothing happened.  I found a reference that said that the pH has to be right around 7.0 for flocculating with alum, so I added a cup of muriatic acid and waited a couple of hours.  I was still unable to scoop anything out with my strainer, so I transferred the 5 gallons to my settling tank, and added another 10 gallons of algae culture.  While dumping the 5 gallons in, I noticed that there had already been some settling of the algae.  I added 3 more cups of acid, and left it to settle overnight.
       
           I wasn't able to check it the next day, but the day after, I drained five gallons from the bottom of the settling tank.  The first gallon was very dark, and the other four were very light, so, it looks like the alum finally accomplished something. 
       
           I poured the first gallon onto the screen and squeegeed it.  What you see in "Harvest.jpg" Is what I was left with after processing this gallon of settled culture.
       
           I took some algae paste that I had extracted using the cream separator, and added distilled water back to it, then put it onto the screen.  I was able to squeegee it, and its consistency was closer to what appeared in the video, but
      the squeegee pushed some of the paste through the screen to the other side.
       
           My conclusion is that microscreening will work, but attention needs to be given to the pore size and the algae size.  Flocculation can be used to make it possible to concentrate a relatively small algae using a relatively large pore size.
       
           I was trying this with Chlorella, which is pretty small.  An alternate strategy might be to go back to polyculture of Chlorella and Euglena, because Euglena is a bigger organism.
       
       
      ---rsb
      Ron Brown
      03MAY2012
       


    • Ron Brown
      ... From: harshith sirigeri Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
      Message 3 of 15 , May 4 10:01 AM
      • 0 Attachment


        --- On Fri, 5/4/12, harshith sirigeri <harshithsirigeri@...> wrote:

        From: harshith sirigeri <harshithsirigeri@...>
        Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening
        To: "oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com" <oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com>
        Date: Friday, May 4, 2012, 7:27 AM

         
        Hello Harshith,

        >>200 grams for 5 gallons!? Ideally 0.5 grams of alum should have been
         
        >>sufficient for this quantity, but add around a gram at max. Its usually
         
        >>10 to 20% of the algae you expect to get from that solution. 

        >>Just add the alum, stir for a minute or 2 and then leave for about 12
         
        >>mins. 
         
             Yes, I know that the quantity I used was excessive, but all my previous attenmpts at flocculation had failed, and 200 grams was the amount of alum I had left .   Adjusting the pH seems to be critical.  It is interesting that alum needs the pH to be lowered, while cornstarch needs it to be increased.  Fortunately, it worked for the 15 gallons, once I had added the acid.
         
         
        ---rsb
        Ron Brown
        04MAY2012
        Regards
        Harshith Sirigeri
        Founder, Green Bubble

        #121, 1st main, 9th cross, 6th phase, W.O.C Road, Basaveshwaranagar, Bangalore-560010 Tel: +919886692494, 080-23386734 www.greenbubble.co.in 


        From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
        To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, May 4, 2012 3:32 AM
        Subject: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening [1 Attachment]

         
        [Attachment(s) from Ron Brown included below]
             Hello, All,
         
             My 280-mesh silkscreen frame arrived.  The screen holds water, but when I squeegeed the algae culture straight out of the pond, I was unable to concentrate or dewater it.
         
             Apparently Harshith was right about the flocculation.  Upon reconsidering what the video shows, I realize that the stuff they are squeegeeing is very thick.
         
             So, I put 5 gallons of algae culture in a bucket and added 200 grams of alum, after dissolving the alum in a saucepan of hot water.  I dumped it in and stirred it thoroughly.  Nothing happened.  I found a reference that said that the pH has to be right around 7.0 for flocculating with alum, so I added a cup of muriatic acid and waited a couple of hours.  I was still unable to scoop anything out with my strainer, so I transferred the 5 gallons to my settling tank, and added another 10 gallons of algae culture.  While dumping the 5 gallons in, I noticed that there had already been some settling of the algae.  I added 3 more cups of acid, and left it to settle overnight.
         
             I wasn't able to check it the next day, but the day after, I drained five gallons from the bottom of the settling tank.  The first gallon was very dark, and the other four were very light, so, it looks like the alum finally accomplished something. 
         
             I poured the first gallon onto the screen and squeegeed it.  What you see in "Harvest.jpg" Is what I was left with after processing this gallon of settled culture.
         
             I took some algae paste that I had extracted using the cream separator, and added distilled water back to it, then put it onto the screen.  I was able to squeegee it, and its consistency was closer to what appeared in the video, but
        the squeegee pushed some of the paste through the screen to the other side.
         
             My conclusion is that microscreening will work, but attention needs to be given to the pore size and the algae size.  Flocculation can be used to make it possible to concentrate a relatively small algae using a relatively large pore size.
         
             I was trying this with Chlorella, which is pretty small.  An alternate strategy might be to go back to polyculture of Chlorella and Euglena, because Euglena is a bigger organism.
         
         
        ---rsb
        Ron Brown
        03MAY2012
         


      • aliendave2525
        Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents This pdf document has some interesting information: www.isws.uiuc.edu/pubdoc/C/ISWSC-108.pdf
        Message 4 of 15 , May 4 12:29 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents

          This pdf document has some interesting information:

          www.isws.uiuc.edu/pubdoc/C/ISWSC-108.pdf



        • Ron Brown
          ... From: aliendave2525 Subject: [oil_from_algae] Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents To:
          Message 5 of 15 , May 4 2:19 PM
          • 0 Attachment

            --- On Fri, 5/4/12, aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...> wrote:

            From: aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...>
            Subject: [oil_from_algae] Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents
            To: "oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com" <oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com>
            Date: Friday, May 4, 2012, 12:29 PM

                 Dave, 
            >>Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents

            >>This pdf document has some interesting information:
             
                 Very useful information.  I found the discussion of flocculation to be most helpful.  Perhaps the sand filter should be revisited.  I recall reading in another paper that diatomaceous earth filters (of the type used on swimming pools) can clean water down to 1 micron.  This  study confirms that DE filters cleared 100 % of the algae from the water.
             
             
            ---rsb
            Ron Brown
            04MAY2012
            www.isws.uiuc.edu/pubdoc/C/ISWSC-108.pdf



          • aliendave2525
            Ya!...I wish there was a 1 stop info source that had all these kinds of good key information in 1 book...an Algae Biofuel Technical Handbook...with just the
            Message 6 of 15 , May 4 9:22 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              Ya!...I wish there was a 1 stop info source that had all these kinds of good key information in 1 book...an Algae Biofuel Technical Handbook...with just the facts and #s and designs and concepts and calculations, and not just the old stuff, but also including the new stuff.
              There is so much info scattered all over, and we all together trying to dig up the same info...

              Something else I tried, that worked well, I am just stuck on how to automate it at a very low cost.
              I cut the bottom of a 2L soda bottle off, then 50% filled the 2L bottle with cotton, then ran low flow rate in to it (around 1LPM), then the flow out at the bottle cap with small holes flowed back in to the source container.
              The cotton collected most of the algae, and stopped it, then I moved the 2L bottle over to the collection container and pushed the cotton down and was a higher density of algae compared to the source container.
              Then let that settle over night for further separation.
              It helped to speed up the amount collected to be put in to the settling stage, so had higher density to settle.



              From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
              To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Friday, May 4, 2012 2:19 PM
              Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents




              --- On Fri, 5/4/12, aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...> wrote:

              From: aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...>
              Subject: [oil_from_algae] Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents
              To: "oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com" <oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com>
              Date: Friday, May 4, 2012, 12:29 PM

                   Dave, 
              >>Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents

              >>This pdf document has some interesting information:
               
                   Very useful information.  I found the discussion of flocculation to be most helpful.  Perhaps the sand filter should be revisited.  I recall reading in another paper that diatomaceous earth filters (of the type used on swimming pools) can clean water down to 1 micron.  This  study confirms that DE filters cleared 100 % of the algae from the water.
               
               
              ---rsb
              Ron Brown




            • Ron Brown
              ... From: aliendave2525 Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents To:
              Message 7 of 15 , May 5 11:06 AM
              • 0 Attachment


                --- On Fri, 5/4/12, aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...> wrote:

                From: aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...>
                Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents
                To: "oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com" <oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com>
                Date: Friday, May 4, 2012, 9:22 PM
                     Dave,
                 
                >>Ya!...I wish there was a 1 stop info source that had all these kinds of good
                 
                >>key information in 1 book...an Algae Biofuel Technical Handbook...with
                 
                >>just the facts and #s and designs and concepts and calculations, and not
                 
                >>just the old stuff, but also including the new stuff.
                 
                >>There is so much info scattered all over, and we all together trying to dig up
                 
                >>the same info...

                     That's just the way the world works.  If it were too easy, there would be no challenge.

                 
                >>I cut the bottom of a 2L soda bottle off, then 50% filled the 2L bottle with
                 
                >>cotton, then ran low flow rate in to it (around 1LPM), then the flow out at
                 
                >>the bottle cap with small holes flowed back in to the source container.
                 
                >>The cotton collected most of the algae, and stopped it, then I moved the
                 
                >>2L bottle over to the collection container and pushed the cotton down and
                 
                >>was a higher density of algae compared to the source container.
                 
                >>Then let that settle over night for further separation.
                 
                     That's an interesting approach.
                 
                 
                ---rsb
                Ron Brown
                05MAY2012
                 
                .

              • Ron Brown
                ... From: Ron Brown Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents To:
                Message 8 of 15 , May 5 12:41 PM
                • 0 Attachment


                  --- On Sat, 5/5/12, Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...> wrote:

                  From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
                  Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents
                  To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Saturday, May 5, 2012, 11:06 AM



                  --- On Fri, 5/4/12, aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...> wrote:

                  From: aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...>
                  Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents
                  To: "oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com" <oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com>
                  Date: Friday, May 4, 2012, 9:22 PM
                   
                       Dave,
                     
                  >>I cut the bottom of a 2L soda bottle off, then 50% filled the 2L bottle
                   
                  >>with cotton, then ran low flow rate in to it (around 1LPM), then the flow
                   
                  >>out at the bottle cap with small holes flowed back in to the source
                   
                  >>container. The cotton collected most of the algae, and stopped it, then I
                   
                  >>moved the 2L bottle over to the collection container and pushed the
                   
                  >>cotton down and was a higher density of algae compared to the source
                   
                  >>container. Then let that settle over night for further separation.
                   
                  >>>That's an interesting approach.
                   
                       Why not extend this thinking a little bit.  Instead of using cotton fibers as our filter material, why not grow filamentaceous algae like Spirulina or Spirogyra, and use that as our filter material?  These are easy to harvest --one millimeter pore size will work for them.  When the harvest is done, the filter material becomes part of the crop.  While it is true that these algae tend to produce single-digits of oil content, their use as a harvesting aid would seem to make up for that deficiency.
                   
                  ---rsb
                  Ron Brown
                  05MAY2012
                   
                  .

                • aliendave2525
                  the cotton was used so can squeeze it easily to drain the concentrated algae out, like a sponge, and sponge would do well too. A clothe like a towel would work
                  Message 9 of 15 , May 5 7:01 PM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    the cotton was used so can squeeze it easily to drain the concentrated algae out, like a sponge, and sponge would do well too.
                    A clothe like a towel would work too then need to do something to it to squeeze out the concentrated algae.
                    In the past I used an old cotton t-shirt but for some reason it just fell a part like as if some micro organism eat the cotton t-shirt, when went to twist out the algae the cotton t-shirt fell a part like a paper towel.
                    those other options you mentioned require much more effort to get the algae out of the material and usually some other stuff needed to add to make it all work together.




                    From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
                    To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Saturday, May 5, 2012 12:41 PM
                    Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents





                    --- On Sat, 5/5/12, Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...> wrote:

                    From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
                    Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents
                    To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Saturday, May 5, 2012, 11:06 AM



                    --- On Fri, 5/4/12, aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...> wrote:

                    From: aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...>
                    Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents
                    To: "oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com" <oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com>
                    Date: Friday, May 4, 2012, 9:22 PM
                     
                         Dave,
                       
                    >>I cut the bottom of a 2L soda bottle off, then 50% filled the 2L bottle
                     
                    >>with cotton, then ran low flow rate in to it (around 1LPM), then the flow
                     
                    >>out at the bottle cap with small holes flowed back in to the source
                     
                    >>container. The cotton collected most of the algae, and stopped it, then I
                     
                    >>moved the 2L bottle over to the collection container and pushed the
                     
                    >>cotton down and was a higher density of algae compared to the source
                     
                    >>container. Then let that settle over night for further separation.
                     
                    >>>That's an interesting approach.
                     
                         Why not extend this thinking a little bit.  Instead of using cotton fibers as our filter material, why not grow filamentaceous algae like Spirulina or Spirogyra, and use that as our filter material?  These are easy to harvest --one millimeter pore size will work for them.  When the harvest is done, the filter material becomes part of the crop.  While it is true that these algae tend to produce single-digits of oil content, their use as a harvesting aid would seem to make up for that deficiency.
                     
                    ---rsb
                    Ron Brown
                    05MAY2012
                     
                    .





                  • Bobby Yates Emory
                    Dave, I agree we need an all round handbook. The problem is there are so many sources. Do we try to include everything or do we try to pick out the studies
                    Message 10 of 15 , May 5 11:10 PM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Dave,

                      I agree we need an all round handbook.  The problem is there are so many sources.   Do we try to include everything or do we try to pick out the studies that are relevant?

                      I am willing to bet that more than 90% of the studies are worthless or would lead people astray.

                      But let's get on with creating that handbook.

                      Bobby


                      On Sat, May 5, 2012 at 12:22 AM, aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...> wrote:
                       

                      Ya!...I wish there was a 1 stop info source that had all these kinds of good key information in 1 book...an Algae Biofuel Technical Handbook...with just the facts and #s and designs and concepts and calculations, and not just the old stuff, but also including the new stuff.
                      There is so much info scattered all over, and we all together trying to dig up the same info...

                      Something else I tried, that worked well, I am just stuck on how to automate it at a very low cost.
                      I cut the bottom of a 2L soda bottle off, then 50% filled the 2L bottle with cotton, then ran low flow rate in to it (around 1LPM), then the flow out at the bottle cap with small holes flowed back in to the source container.
                      The cotton collected most of the algae, and stopped it, then I moved the 2L bottle over to the collection container and pushed the cotton down and was a higher density of algae compared to the source container.
                      Then let that settle over night for further separation.
                      It helped to speed up the amount collected to be put in to the settling stage, so had higher density to settle.



                      From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
                      To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Friday, May 4, 2012 2:19 PM
                      Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents




                      --- On Fri, 5/4/12, aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...> wrote:

                      From: aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...>
                      Subject: [oil_from_algae] Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents
                      To: "oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com" <oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com>
                      Date: Friday, May 4, 2012, 12:29 PM

                           Dave, 
                      >>Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents

                      >>This pdf document has some interesting information:
                       
                           Very useful information.  I found the discussion of flocculation to be most helpful.  Perhaps the sand filter should be revisited.  I recall reading in another paper that diatomaceous earth filters (of the type used on swimming pools) can clean water down to 1 micron.  This  study confirms that DE filters cleared 100 % of the algae from the water.
                       
                       
                      ---rsb
                      Ron Brown







                      --
                      Toward freedom,

                      Bobby Yates Emory
                    • aliendave2525
                      Ya that would be cool, but as for me I am no expert and my mind feels like it deteriorating a little more day by day...so I am not worthy of such a task...and
                      Message 11 of 15 , May 6 12:30 AM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Ya that would be cool, but as for me I am no expert and my mind feels like it deteriorating a little more day by day...so I am not worthy of such a task...and I got too much on my plate presently...
                        If it could make me some $ maybe...and I change my present plans then maybe give it a try...it depends on things go in near future for me...
                        But for now I am focused too much on a feasible backyard algae biofuel system (goal to be for enough fuel for 1 average car needs per month, and so far per calculations and small experiments looks like can be done via 14x14 ft area, just have to figure out the best cheapest automated design concept, unfortunately cost is too high presently over $5000-$10000 for DIY'ers, and goal on cost is around $2000 for DIY'ers, the high cost of electric valves is the big kicker that has added up in the design, of course people can go manual but then becomes too much of a hassle for the average person) and if works out then want to give the details, parts list, etc. on that away for free for any DIY'er to snap a system together for themselves or for friends.

                        However David Sieg here in the group has done some great book writing on algae so far, and has a well known name for himself out there, maybe he would want to do it to add to his great works.
                        It would be very difficult to do such a book...maybe a starting point is have everyone chip in with sources and then post on a website and every reading posts a valuation # rating or like or not like and comments and then use that info to dig in to and then put together in a book in a technical engineering handbook style, it does not have to be a story from a-z, but full of technical engineering info so one can use a a reference and then design a system with the info from the book. And everyone can use to drop in a new or old and interesting source of info.
                        Anyway its a very big and challenging task.




                        From: Bobby Yates Emory <liberty1@...>
                        To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Saturday, May 5, 2012 11:10 PM
                        Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents



                        Dave,

                        I agree we need an all round handbook.  The problem is there are so many sources.   Do we try to include everything or do we try to pick out the studies that are relevant?

                        I am willing to bet that more than 90% of the studies are worthless or would lead people astray.

                        But let's get on with creating that handbook.

                        Bobby


                        On Sat, May 5, 2012 at 12:22 AM, aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...> wrote:
                         
                        Ya!...I wish there was a 1 stop info source that had all these kinds of good key information in 1 book...an Algae Biofuel Technical Handbook...with just the facts and #s and designs and concepts and calculations, and not just the old stuff, but also including the new stuff.
                        There is so much info scattered all over, and we all together trying to dig up the same info...

                        Something else I tried, that worked well, I am just stuck on how to automate it at a very low cost.
                        I cut the bottom of a 2L soda bottle off, then 50% filled the 2L bottle with cotton, then ran low flow rate in to it (around 1LPM), then the flow out at the bottle cap with small holes flowed back in to the source container.
                        The cotton collected most of the algae, and stopped it, then I moved the 2L bottle over to the collection container and pushed the cotton down and was a higher density of algae compared to the source container.
                        Then let that settle over night for further separation.
                        It helped to speed up the amount collected to be put in to the settling stage, so had higher density to settle.



                        From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
                        To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Friday, May 4, 2012 2:19 PM
                        Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents




                        --- On Fri, 5/4/12, aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...> wrote:

                        From: aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...>
                        Subject: [oil_from_algae] Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents
                        To: "oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com" <oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com>
                        Date: Friday, May 4, 2012, 12:29 PM

                             Dave, 
                        >>Removal of Algae from Waste Stabilization Pond Effluents

                        >>This pdf document has some interesting information:
                         
                             Very useful information.  I found the discussion of flocculation to be most helpful.  Perhaps the sand filter should be revisited.  I recall reading in another paper that diatomaceous earth filters (of the type used on swimming pools) can clean water down to 1 micron.  This  study confirms that DE filters cleared 100 % of the algae from the water.
                         
                         
                        ---rsb
                        Ron Brown







                        --
                        Toward freedom,

                        Bobby Yates Emory




                      • aliendave2525
                        I recently did a few settling tank tests. I used a tall thin poly type bag tube. 2.5 wide 3 tall. This was side by side with a 5 gallon bucket which had very
                        Message 12 of 15 , May 7 9:07 PM
                        • 0 Attachment
                          I recently did a few settling tank tests.

                          I used a tall thin poly type bag tube. 2.5" wide 3' tall.
                          This was side by side with a 5 gallon bucket which had very little noticeable settling by the time that other test unit was done settling.

                          A few things I noticed is that settling time was well over half as much as an average 5 gallon bucket.
                          Also since it was clear I could see some things going on, that was as some of the early clumped up algae slowly dropped and passed lower algae that not drop or clump up yet in its path it seemed to collect together (since it did eventually clear up and all settle), also during the hot day there was thermal flow and some of the still flowing algae clumps flowed around appearing to collect with more algae, then at night getting cold it all dropped, and by morning it was very clear, and algae settled at the bottom. In the past with another test I had notice putting the algae in the freezer then letting it thaw increased settling time, but energy wise was not worth it, however these test lead me to think the process of warm to cold can increase settling time, and using tall thin diameter tubes for settling is much faster then tank settling, the real scientific reason why I do not know.

                          The other test I did was with corn starch with a settling tank, and it helped to make the algae settle even faster, maybe that is old information, but was new to me. But I am not sure how that effects putting some of that back in to the main system, because settling is my key way plan to separate the young from the old to have continuous growth stage.




                          From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
                          To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Friday, May 4, 2012 10:01 AM
                          Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening





                          --- On Fri, 5/4/12, harshith sirigeri <harshithsirigeri@...> wrote:

                          From: harshith sirigeri <harshithsirigeri@...>
                          Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening
                          To: "oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com" <oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com>
                          Date: Friday, May 4, 2012, 7:27 AM

                           
                          Hello Harshith,

                          >>200 grams for 5 gallons!? Ideally 0.5 grams of alum should have been
                           
                          >>sufficient for this quantity, but add around a gram at max. Its usually
                           
                          >>10 to 20% of the algae you expect to get from that solution. 

                          >>Just add the alum, stir for a minute or 2 and then leave for about 12
                           
                          >>mins. 
                           
                               Yes, I know that the quantity I used was excessive, but all my previous attenmpts at flocculation had failed, and 200 grams was the amount of alum I had left .   Adjusting the pH seems to be critical.  It is interesting that alum needs the pH to be lowered, while cornstarch needs it to be increased.  Fortunately, it worked for the 15 gallons, once I had added the acid.
                           
                           
                          ---rsb
                          Ron Brown
                          04MAY2012
                          Regards
                          Harshith Sirigeri
                          Founder, Green Bubble

                          #121, 1st main, 9th cross, 6th phase, W.O.C Road, Basaveshwaranagar, Bangalore-560010 Tel: +919886692494, 080-23386734 www.greenbubble.co.in 


                          From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
                          To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Friday, May 4, 2012 3:32 AM
                          Subject: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening [1 Attachment]

                           
                          [Attachment(s) from Ron Brown included below]
                               Hello, All,
                           
                               My 280-mesh silkscreen frame arrived.  The screen holds water, but when I squeegeed the algae culture straight out of the pond, I was unable to concentrate or dewater it.
                           
                               Apparently Harshith was right about the flocculation.  Upon reconsidering what the video shows, I realize that the stuff they are squeegeeing is very thick.
                           
                               So, I put 5 gallons of algae culture in a bucket and added 200 grams of alum, after dissolving the alum in a saucepan of hot water.  I dumped it in and stirred it thoroughly.  Nothing happened.  I found a reference that said that the pH has to be right around 7.0 for flocculating with alum, so I added a cup of muriatic acid and waited a couple of hours.  I was still unable to scoop anything out with my strainer, so I transferred the 5 gallons to my settling tank, and added another 10 gallons of algae culture.  While dumping the 5 gallons in, I noticed that there had already been some settling of the algae.  I added 3 more cups of acid, and left it to settle overnight.
                           
                               I wasn't able to check it the next day, but the day after, I drained five gallons from the bottom of the settling tank.  The first gallon was very dark, and the other four were very light, so, it looks like the alum finally accomplished something. 
                           
                               I poured the first gallon onto the screen and squeegeed it.  What you see in "Harvest.jpg" Is what I was left with after processing this gallon of settled culture.
                           
                               I took some algae paste that I had extracted using the cream separator, and added distilled water back to it, then put it onto the screen.  I was able to squeegee it, and its consistency was closer to what appeared in the video, but
                          the squeegee pushed some of the paste through the screen to the other side.
                           
                               My conclusion is that microscreening will work, but attention needs to be given to the pore size and the algae size.  Flocculation can be used to make it possible to concentrate a relatively small algae using a relatively large pore size.
                           
                               I was trying this with Chlorella, which is pretty small.  An alternate strategy might be to go back to polyculture of Chlorella and Euglena, because Euglena is a bigger organism.
                           
                           
                          ---rsb
                          Ron Brown
                          03MAY2012
                           






                        • Ron Brown
                          ... Ron Brown (potrzebie44@yahoo.com) ... From: aliendave2525 Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening To:
                          Message 13 of 15 , May 7 10:32 PM
                          • 0 Attachment


                            ---rsb
                            Ron Brown
                            (potrzebie44@...)

                            --- On Mon, 5/7/12, aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...> wrote:

                            From: aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...>
                            Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening
                            To: "oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com" <oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com>
                            Date: Monday, May 7, 2012, 9:07 PM

                             Dave,

                             
                            >>A few things I noticed is that settling time was well over half as much >>as  lead me to think the process of warm to cold can increase settling time, >>and using tall thin diameter tubes for settling is much faster then tank >>settling, the real scientific reason why I do not know.
                             
                                 Tall, small-dioameter reaction vessels tend to work better than short, large-diameter ones.  I'm not sure why, either, but I'm sure there are good reasons.

                             
                            >>The other test I did was with corn starch with a settling tank, and it helped >>to make the algae settle even faster, maybe that is old information, but was >>new to me. But I am not sure how that effects putting some of that back in >>to the main system, because settling is my key way plan to separate the >>young from the old to have continuous growth stage.

                                 Did you adjust the pH at all?  I have read that the pH has to be elevated for cornstarch to work well.  Once the cornstarch is in the water, it can go back into the batch, and won't harm anything.  It may even be usable by the algae as food.
                             
                             
                            ---rsb
                            Ron Brown
                            07MAY2012


                            From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
                            To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Friday, May 4, 2012 10:01 AM
                            Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening





                            --- On Fri, 5/4/12, harshith sirigeri <harshithsirigeri@...> wrote:

                            From: harshith sirigeri <harshithsirigeri@...>
                            Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening
                            To: "oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com" <oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com>
                            Date: Friday, May 4, 2012, 7:27 AM

                             
                            Hello Harshith,

                            >>200 grams for 5 gallons!? Ideally 0.5 grams of alum should have been
                             
                            >>sufficient for this quantity, but add around a gram at max. Its usually
                             
                            >>10 to 20% of the algae you expect to get from that solution. 

                            >>Just add the alum, stir for a minute or 2 and then leave for about 12
                             
                            >>mins. 
                             
                                 Yes, I know that the quantity I used was excessive, but all my previous attenmpts at flocculation had failed, and 200 grams was the amount of alum I had left .   Adjusting the pH seems to be critical.  It is interesting that alum needs the pH to be lowered, while cornstarch needs it to be increased.  Fortunately, it worked for the 15 gallons, once I had added the acid.
                             
                             
                            ---rsb
                            Ron Brown
                            04MAY2012
                            Regards
                            Harshith Sirigeri
                            Founder, Green Bubble

                            #121, 1st main, 9th cross, 6th phase, W.O.C Road, Basaveshwaranagar, Bangalore-560010 Tel: +919886692494, 080-23386734 www.greenbubble.co.in 


                            From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
                            To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Friday, May 4, 2012 3:32 AM
                            Subject: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening [1 Attachment]

                             
                            [Attachment(s) from Ron Brown included below]
                                 Hello, All,
                             
                                 My 280-mesh silkscreen frame arrived.  The screen holds water, but when I squeegeed the algae culture straight out of the pond, I was unable to concentrate or dewater it.
                             
                                 Apparently Harshith was right about the flocculation.  Upon reconsidering what the video shows, I realize that the stuff they are squeegeeing is very thick.
                             
                                 So, I put 5 gallons of algae culture in a bucket and added 200 grams of alum, after dissolving the alum in a saucepan of hot water.  I dumped it in and stirred it thoroughly.  Nothing happened.  I found a reference that said that the pH has to be right around 7.0 for flocculating with alum, so I added a cup of muriatic acid and waited a couple of hours.  I was still unable to scoop anything out with my strainer, so I transferred the 5 gallons to my settling tank, and added another 10 gallons of algae culture.  While dumping the 5 gallons in, I noticed that there had already been some settling of the algae.  I added 3 more cups of acid, and left it to settle overnight.
                             
                                 I wasn't able to check it the next day, but the day after, I drained five gallons from the bottom of the settling tank.  The first gallon was very dark, and the other four were very light, so, it looks like the alum finally accomplished something. 
                             
                                 I poured the first gallon onto the screen and squeegeed it.  What you see in "Harvest.jpg" Is what I was left with after processing this gallon of settled culture.
                             
                                 I took some algae paste that I had extracted using the cream separator, and added distilled water back to it, then put it onto the screen.  I was able to squeegee it, and its consistency was closer to what appeared in the video, but
                            the squeegee pushed some of the paste through the screen to the other side.
                             
                                 My conclusion is that microscreening will work, but attention needs to be given to the pore size and the algae size.  Flocculation can be used to make it possible to concentrate a relatively small algae using a relatively large pore size.
                             
                                 I was trying this with Chlorella, which is pretty small.  An alternate strategy might be to go back to polyculture of Chlorella and Euglena, because Euglena is a bigger organism.
                             
                             
                            ---rsb
                            Ron Brown
                            03MAY2012
                             






                          • aliendave2525
                            I am just guessing but my thoughts on the taller smaller diameter settling container works better maybe that as the algae settles it collects each other on the
                            Message 14 of 15 , May 8 12:41 AM
                            • 0 Attachment
                              I am just guessing but my thoughts on the taller smaller diameter settling container works better maybe that as the algae settles it collects each other on the way down and so gets bigger collecting more and more and pushing down more and more and so settles quickers, maybe???

                              No I did not adjust the pH. But that would probably may is work better.
                              What pH direction do I adjust it to? below 7 or above 7? Once I know I will put in baking soda or vinegar.

                              Thanks



                              From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
                              To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Monday, May 7, 2012 10:32 PM
                              Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening





                              ---rsb
                              Ron Brown
                              (potrzebie44@...)

                              --- On Mon, 5/7/12, aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...> wrote:

                              From: aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...>
                              Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening
                              To: "oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com" <oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com>
                              Date: Monday, May 7, 2012, 9:07 PM

                               Dave,

                               
                              >>A few things I noticed is that settling time was well over half as much >>as  lead me to think the process of warm to cold can increase settling time, >>and using tall thin diameter tubes for settling is much faster then tank >>settling, the real scientific reason why I do not know.
                               
                                   Tall, small-dioameter reaction vessels tend to work better than short, large-diameter ones.  I'm not sure why, either, but I'm sure there are good reasons.

                               
                              >>The other test I did was with corn starch with a settling tank, and it helped >>to make the algae settle even faster, maybe that is old information, but was >>new to me. But I am not sure how that effects putting some of that back in >>to the main system, because settling is my key way plan to separate the >>young from the old to have continuous growth stage.

                                   Did you adjust the pH at all?  I have read that the pH has to be elevated for cornstarch to work well.  Once the cornstarch is in the water, it can go back into the batch, and won't harm anything.  It may even be usable by the algae as food.
                               
                               
                              ---rsb
                              Ron Brown
                              07MAY2012


                              From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
                              To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Friday, May 4, 2012 10:01 AM
                              Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening





                              --- On Fri, 5/4/12, harshith sirigeri <harshithsirigeri@...> wrote:

                              From: harshith sirigeri <harshithsirigeri@...>
                              Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening
                              To: "oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com" <oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com>
                              Date: Friday, May 4, 2012, 7:27 AM

                               
                              Hello Harshith,

                              >>200 grams for 5 gallons!? Ideally 0.5 grams of alum should have been
                               
                              >>sufficient for this quantity, but add around a gram at max. Its usually
                               
                              >>10 to 20% of the algae you expect to get from that solution. 

                              >>Just add the alum, stir for a minute or 2 and then leave for about 12
                               
                              >>mins. 
                               
                                   Yes, I know that the quantity I used was excessive, but all my previous attenmpts at flocculation had failed, and 200 grams was the amount of alum I had left .   Adjusting the pH seems to be critical.  It is interesting that alum needs the pH to be lowered, while cornstarch needs it to be increased.  Fortunately, it worked for the 15 gallons, once I had added the acid.
                               
                               
                              ---rsb
                              Ron Brown
                              04MAY2012
                              Regards
                              Harshith Sirigeri
                              Founder, Green Bubble

                              #121, 1st main, 9th cross, 6th phase, W.O.C Road, Basaveshwaranagar, Bangalore-560010 Tel: +919886692494, 080-23386734 www.greenbubble.co.in 


                              From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
                              To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Friday, May 4, 2012 3:32 AM
                              Subject: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening [1 Attachment]

                               
                              [Attachment(s) from Ron Brown included below]
                                   Hello, All,
                               
                                   My 280-mesh silkscreen frame arrived.  The screen holds water, but when I squeegeed the algae culture straight out of the pond, I was unable to concentrate or dewater it.
                               
                                   Apparently Harshith was right about the flocculation.  Upon reconsidering what the video shows, I realize that the stuff they are squeegeeing is very thick.
                               
                                   So, I put 5 gallons of algae culture in a bucket and added 200 grams of alum, after dissolving the alum in a saucepan of hot water.  I dumped it in and stirred it thoroughly.  Nothing happened.  I found a reference that said that the pH has to be right around 7.0 for flocculating with alum, so I added a cup of muriatic acid and waited a couple of hours.  I was still unable to scoop anything out with my strainer, so I transferred the 5 gallons to my settling tank, and added another 10 gallons of algae culture.  While dumping the 5 gallons in, I noticed that there had already been some settling of the algae.  I added 3 more cups of acid, and left it to settle overnight.
                               
                                   I wasn't able to check it the next day, but the day after, I drained five gallons from the bottom of the settling tank.  The first gallon was very dark, and the other four were very light, so, it looks like the alum finally accomplished something. 
                               
                                   I poured the first gallon onto the screen and squeegeed it.  What you see in "Harvest.jpg" Is what I was left with after processing this gallon of settled culture.
                               
                                   I took some algae paste that I had extracted using the cream separator, and added distilled water back to it, then put it onto the screen.  I was able to squeegee it, and its consistency was closer to what appeared in the video, but
                              the squeegee pushed some of the paste through the screen to the other side.
                               
                                   My conclusion is that microscreening will work, but attention needs to be given to the pore size and the algae size.  Flocculation can be used to make it possible to concentrate a relatively small algae using a relatively large pore size.
                               
                                   I was trying this with Chlorella, which is pretty small.  An alternate strategy might be to go back to polyculture of Chlorella and Euglena, because Euglena is a bigger organism.
                               
                               
                              ---rsb
                              Ron Brown
                              03MAY2012
                               










                            • Ron Brown
                              ... From: aliendave2525 Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                              Message 15 of 15 , May 8 10:54 AM
                              • 0 Attachment


                                --- On Tue, 5/8/12, aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...> wrote:

                                From: aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...>
                                Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening
                                To: "oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com" <oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com>
                                Date: Tuesday, May 8, 2012, 12:41 AM
                                Dave,
                                 
                                >>I am just guessing but my thoughts on the taller smaller diameter settling
                                 
                                >>container works better maybe that as the algae settles it collects each other
                                 
                                >>on the way down and so gets bigger collecting more and more and pushing
                                 
                                >>down more and more and so settles quickers, maybe???
                                 
                                     That could be part of it.  When I attended a course in making biodiesel taught by Girl Mark, she said that tall, narrow reactors work better, but did not explore why this is so.

                                 
                                >>No I did not adjust the pH. But that would probably may is work better.
                                 
                                >>What pH direction do I adjust it to? below 7 or above 7? Once I know I
                                 
                                >>will put in baking soda or vinegar.
                                 
                                     With cornstarch, the pH nereds to increase, so baking soda should work better than vinegar.
                                 
                                 
                                ---rsb
                                Ron Brown
                                08MAY2012
                                Thanks



                                From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
                                To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Monday, May 7, 2012 10:32 PM
                                Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening





                                ---rsb
                                Ron Brown
                                (potrzebie44@...)

                                --- On Mon, 5/7/12, aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...> wrote:

                                From: aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...>
                                Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening
                                To: "oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com" <oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com>
                                Date: Monday, May 7, 2012, 9:07 PM

                                 Dave,

                                 
                                >>A few things I noticed is that settling time was well over half as much >>as  lead me to think the process of warm to cold can increase settling time, >>and using tall thin diameter tubes for settling is much faster then tank >>settling, the real scientific reason why I do not know.
                                 
                                     Tall, small-dioameter reaction vessels tend to work better than short, large-diameter ones.  I'm not sure why, either, but I'm sure there are good reasons.

                                 
                                >>The other test I did was with corn starch with a settling tank, and it helped >>to make the algae settle even faster, maybe that is old information, but was >>new to me. But I am not sure how that effects putting some of that back in >>to the main system, because settling is my key way plan to separate the >>young from the old to have continuous growth stage.

                                     Did you adjust the pH at all?  I have read that the pH has to be elevated for cornstarch to work well.  Once the cornstarch is in the water, it can go back into the batch, and won't harm anything.  It may even be usable by the algae as food.
                                 
                                 
                                ---rsb
                                Ron Brown
                                07MAY2012


                                From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
                                To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Friday, May 4, 2012 10:01 AM
                                Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening





                                --- On Fri, 5/4/12, harshith sirigeri <harshithsirigeri@...> wrote:

                                From: harshith sirigeri <harshithsirigeri@...>
                                Subject: Re: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening
                                To: "oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com" <oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com>
                                Date: Friday, May 4, 2012, 7:27 AM

                                 
                                Hello Harshith,

                                >>200 grams for 5 gallons!? Ideally 0.5 grams of alum should have been
                                 
                                >>sufficient for this quantity, but add around a gram at max. Its usually
                                 
                                >>10 to 20% of the algae you expect to get from that solution. 

                                >>Just add the alum, stir for a minute or 2 and then leave for about 12
                                 
                                >>mins. 
                                 
                                     Yes, I know that the quantity I used was excessive, but all my previous attenmpts at flocculation had failed, and 200 grams was the amount of alum I had left .   Adjusting the pH seems to be critical.  It is interesting that alum needs the pH to be lowered, while cornstarch needs it to be increased.  Fortunately, it worked for the 15 gallons, once I had added the acid.
                                 
                                 
                                ---rsb
                                Ron Brown
                                04MAY2012
                                Regards
                                Harshith Sirigeri
                                Founder, Green Bubble

                                #121, 1st main, 9th cross, 6th phase, W.O.C Road, Basaveshwaranagar, Bangalore-560010 Tel: +919886692494, 080-23386734 www.greenbubble.co.in 


                                From: Ron Brown <potrzebie44@...>
                                To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Friday, May 4, 2012 3:32 AM
                                Subject: [oil_from_algae] Microscreening [1 Attachment]

                                 
                                [Attachment(s) from Ron Brown included below]
                                     Hello, All,
                                 
                                     My 280-mesh silkscreen frame arrived.  The screen holds water, but when I squeegeed the algae culture straight out of the pond, I was unable to concentrate or dewater it.
                                 
                                     Apparently Harshith was right about the flocculation.  Upon reconsidering what the video shows, I realize that the stuff they are squeegeeing is very thick.
                                 
                                     So, I put 5 gallons of algae culture in a bucket and added 200 grams of alum, after dissolving the alum in a saucepan of hot water.  I dumped it in and stirred it thoroughly.  Nothing happened.  I found a reference that said that the pH has to be right around 7.0 for flocculating with alum, so I added a cup of muriatic acid and waited a couple of hours.  I was still unable to scoop anything out with my strainer, so I transferred the 5 gallons to my settling tank, and added another 10 gallons of algae culture.  While dumping the 5 gallons in, I noticed that there had already been some settling of the algae.  I added 3 more cups of acid, and left it to settle overnight.
                                 
                                     I wasn't able to check it the next day, but the day after, I drained five gallons from the bottom of the settling tank.  The first gallon was very dark, and the other four were very light, so, it looks like the alum finally accomplished something. 
                                 
                                     I poured the first gallon onto the screen and squeegeed it.  What you see in "Harvest.jpg" Is what I was left with after processing this gallon of settled culture.
                                 
                                     I took some algae paste that I had extracted using the cream separator, and added distilled water back to it, then put it onto the screen.  I was able to squeegee it, and its consistency was closer to what appeared in the video, but
                                the squeegee pushed some of the paste through the screen to the other side.
                                 
                                     My conclusion is that microscreening will work, but attention needs to be given to the pore size and the algae size.  Flocculation can be used to make it possible to concentrate a relatively small algae using a relatively large pore size.
                                 
                                     I was trying this with Chlorella, which is pretty small.  An alternate strategy might be to go back to polyculture of Chlorella and Euglena, because Euglena is a bigger organism.
                                 
                                 
                                ---rsb
                                Ron Brown
                                03MAY2012
                                 










                              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.