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it is Cyanobacteria Spirulna.. Blue gree alge that has been grown for food

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  • Bruce Carroll Lendrum
    Bobby, This is only a different name for cyanobacterium spirulina : to the average microbiology .. we are going to change naming soon..So it called both an
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 1, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Bobby,
       This is only a different name for cyanobacterium spirulina : to the average microbiology .. we are going to change naming soon..So it called both an Algae or bacteria,green

      Algal research

      G350/531 Rights Managed

      Caption: Algal research. Researchers tending growth tanks for the Spirulina blue-green alga (cyanobacterium, green). Extracts from Spirulina are being studied for medical and health uses, which include protein and energy drinks, skin gels and also anti-cancer properties. Photographed at the French research company Alpha-Biotech, France. Sorry about that...  

      From UC Burkley..

      Cyanobacteria: Life History and Ecology

      Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic.

      Though cyanobacteria do not have a great diversity of form, and though they are microscopic, they are rich in chemical diversity. Cyanobacteria get their name from the bluish pigment phycocyanin, which they use to capture light for photosynthesis. They also contain chlorophyll a, the same photosynthetic pigment that plants use. In fact the chloroplast in plants is a symbiotic cyanobacterium, taken up by a green algal ancestor of the plants sometime in the Precambrian. However, not all "blue-green" bacteria are blue; some common forms are red or pink from the pigment phycoerythrin. These bacteria are often found growing on greenhouse glass, or around sinks and drains. The Red Sea gets its name from occasional blooms of a reddish species of Oscillatoria, and African flamingos get their pink color from eating Spirulina.

      Whatever their color, cyanobacteria are photosynthetic, and so can manufacture their own food. This has caused them to be dubbed "blue-green algae", though they have no relationship to any of the various eukayotic algae. The term "algae" merely refers to any aquatic organisms capable of photosynthesis, and so applies to several groups.


      Cyanobacteria are important in the nitrogen cycle.

      Cyanobacteria are very important organisms for the health and growth of many plants. They are one of very few groups of organisms that can convert inert atmospheric nitrogen into an organic form, such as nitrate or ammonia. It is these "fixed" forms of nitrogen which plants need for their growth, and must obtain from the soil. Fertilizers work the way they do in part because they contain additional fixed nitrogen which plants can then absorb throough their roots.

      Nitrification cannot occur in the presence of oxygen, so nitrogen is fixed in specialized cells called heterocysts. These cells have an especially thickened wall that contains an anaerobic environment. You can see these larger cells among the filaments of Nostoc, shown at right.

      Many plants, especially legumes, have formed symbiotic relations with nitrifying bacteria, providing specialized tissues in their roots or stems to house the bacteria, in return for organic nitrogen. This has been used to great advantage in the cultivation of rice, where the floating fern Azolla is actively distributed among the rice paddies. The fern houses colonies of the cyanobacterium Anabaena in its leaves, where it fixes nitrogen. The ferns then provide an inexpensive natural fertilizer and nitrogen source for the rice plants when they die at the end of the season.

      Cyanobacteria also form symbiotic relationships with many fungi, forming complex symbiotic "organisms" known as lichens.


      Nutritious or poisonous?

      The cyanobacterium Spirulina, shown at right, has long been valued as a food source; it is high in protein, and can be cultivated in ponds quite easily. In tropical countries, it may be a very important part of the diet, and was eaten regularly by the Aztecs; it is also served in several Oriental dishes. In the US, the popularity of Spirulina is primarily as a "health food", being sold in stores as a dried powder or in tablet form.

      Many other species of cyanobacteria produce populations that are toxic to humans and animals. Blue-green pond scums have been linked to the poisoning of cattle and dogs, and occasionally people. It is therefore not recommended that wild populations be gathered and eaten without some knowledge of the organisms involved.

      Cyanobacteria may cause other problems as well; a species of Lyngbya is responsible for one of the skin irritations commonly known as "swimmer's itch."






      --- In oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com, Bobby Yates Emory <liberty1@...> wrote:
      >
      > Maybe I should have said almost the same as algae.
      >
      > Bobby
      >
      > On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 2:19 AM, Bobby Yates Emory liberty1@...wrote:
      >
      > > Dave,
      > >
      > > It is algae.
      > >
      > > Bobby
      > >
      > >
      > > On Mon, Feb 28, 2011 at 4:17 AM, aliendave2525 aliendave2525@...wrote:
      > >
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> Some news that was on yahoo.com home page today
      > >> I guess algae has a new nemesis
      > >>
      > >> http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110227/ap_on_bi_ge/us_growing_fuel
      > >>
      > >> If this is true this is amazing!
      > >>
      > >> 15,000 gallons per acre per year
      > >> $30 per barrel, $0.96 per gallon
      > >>
      > >> What you all think?
      > >> Is there a catch or what?
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --
      > > Toward freedom,
      > >
      > > Bobby Yates Emory
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      > Toward freedom,
      >
      > Bobby Yates Emory
      >
    • aliendave2525
      Interesting, I wonder if maybe can grow both together, so can double that amount of bio oil, 1/2 from bacteria and 1/2 from algae over same area. and using
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 1, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Interesting, I wonder if maybe can grow both together, so can double that amount of bio oil, 1/2 from bacteria and 1/2 from algae over same area. and using same food, so then make 25,000 gallons/yr/acre?
        Since algae only needs 1/10 of the sunlight per area maybe they can share it? if not maybe have double layer, top being the bacteria container that is clear and thin and another container of algae below it so so light can pass through the top container to the lower container?
        I do not know but maybe someone here knows?
        Either way looks like same/similar hardware setup.


        --- On Tue, 3/1/11, Bruce Carroll Lendrum <lendlabs@...> wrote:

        From: Bruce Carroll Lendrum <lendlabs@...>
        Subject: [oil_from_algae] it is Cyanobacteria Spirulna.. Blue gree alge that has been grown for food
        To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, March 1, 2011, 12:11 AM



        Bobby,
         This is only a different name for cyanobacterium spirulina : to the average microbiology .. we are going to change naming soon..So it called both an Algae or bacteria,green

        Algal research

        G350/531 Rights Managed

        Caption: Algal research. Researchers tending growth tanks for the Spirulina blue-green alga (cyanobacterium, green). Extracts from Spirulina are being studied for medical and health uses, which include protein and energy drinks, skin gels and also anti-cancer properties. Photographed at the French research company Alpha-Biotech, France. Sorry about that...  

        From UC Burkley..

        Cyanobacteria: Life History and Ecology

        Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic.

        Though cyanobacteria do not have a great diversity of form, and though they are microscopic, they are rich in chemical diversity. Cyanobacteria get their name from the bluish pigment phycocyanin, which they use to capture light for photosynthesis. They also contain chlorophyll a, the same photosynthetic pigment that plants use. In fact the chloroplast in plants is a symbiotic cyanobacterium, taken up by a green algal ancestor of the plants sometime in the Precambrian. However, not all "blue-green" bacteria are blue; some common forms are red or pink from the pigment phycoerythrin. These bacteria are often found growing on greenhouse glass, or around sinks and drains. The Red Sea gets its name from occasional blooms of a reddish species of Oscillatoria, and African flamingos get their pink color from eating Spirulina.

        Whatever their color, cyanobacteria are photosynthetic, and so can manufacture their own food. This has caused them to be dubbed "blue-green algae", though they have no relationship to any of the various eukayotic algae. The term "algae" merely refers to any aquatic organisms capable of photosynthesis, and so applies to several groups.


        Cyanobacteria are important in the nitrogen cycle.

        Cyanobacteria are very important organisms for the health and growth of many plants. They are one of very few groups of organisms that can convert inert atmospheric nitrogen into an organic form, such as nitrate or ammonia. It is these "fixed" forms of nitrogen which plants need for their growth, and must obtain from the soil. Fertilizers work the way they do in part because they contain additional fixed nitrogen which plants can then absorb throough their roots.

        Nitrification cannot occur in the presence of oxygen, so nitrogen is fixed in specialized cells called heterocysts. These cells have an especially thickened wall that contains an anaerobic environment. You can see these larger cells among the filaments of Nostoc, shown at right.

        Many plants, especially legumes, have formed symbiotic relations with nitrifying bacteria, providing specialized tissues in their roots or stems to house the bacteria, in return for organic nitrogen. This has been used to great advantage in the cultivation of rice, where the floating fern Azolla is actively distributed among the rice paddies. The fern houses colonies of the cyanobacterium Anabaena in its leaves, where it fixes nitrogen. The ferns then provide an inexpensive natural fertilizer and nitrogen source for the rice plants when they die at the end of the season.

        Cyanobacteria also form symbiotic relationships with many fungi, forming complex symbiotic "organisms" known as lichens.


        Nutritious or poisonous?

        The cyanobacterium Spirulina, shown at right, has long been valued as a food source; it is high in protein, and can be cultivated in ponds quite easily. In tropical countries, it may be a very important part of the diet, and was eaten regularly by the Aztecs; it is also served in several Oriental dishes. In the US, the popularity of Spirulina is primarily as a "health food", being sold in stores as a dried powder or in tablet form.

        Many other species of cyanobacteria produce populations that are toxic to humans and animals. Blue-green pond scums have been linked to the poisoning of cattle and dogs, and occasionally people. It is therefore not recommended that wild populations be gathered and eaten without some knowledge of the organisms involved.

        Cyanobacteria may cause other problems as well; a species of Lyngbya is responsible for one of the skin irritations commonly known as "swimmer's itch."






        --- In oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com, Bobby Yates Emory <liberty1@...> wrote:
        >
        > Maybe I should have said almost the same as algae.
        >
        > Bobby
        >
        > On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 2:19 AM, Bobby Yates Emory liberty1@...wrote:
        >
        > > Dave,
        > >
        > > It is algae.
        > >
        > > Bobby
        > >
        > >
        > > On Mon, Feb 28, 2011 at 4:17 AM, aliendave2525 aliendave2525@...wrote:
        > >
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> Some news that was on yahoo.com home page today
        > >> I guess algae has a new nemesis
        > >>
        > >> http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110227/ap_on_bi_ge/us_growing_fuel
        > >>
        > >> If this is true this is amazing!
        > >>
        > >> 15,000 gallons per acre per year
        > >> $30 per barrel, $0.96 per gallon
        > >>
        > >> What you all think?
        > >> Is there a catch or what?
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --
        > > Toward freedom,
        > >
        > > Bobby Yates Emory
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > Toward freedom,
        >
        > Bobby Yates Emory
        >



      • Bruce Carroll Lendrum
        Yes, Algae grows well with bacteria.. B.Braunii likes waste water full of PO4 and CO2.. Both created by bacteria brackdown of waste. It also like the
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 1, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          Yes, Algae grows well with bacteria.. B.Braunii likes waste water full
          of PO4 and CO2.. Both created by bacteria brackdown of waste. It also
          like the brackishness of low salt water estuaries like "East River".
          Spain uses this to clean up the water from major cities.Problem with
          light is the "bloom" covers the top and blocks light to the bottom where
          life dies to to lack of O2 and Light. The best solution to this is a
          strong air line and lot of bubbles.

          Bruce
          --- In oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com, aliendave2525 <aliendave2525@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Interesting, I wonder if maybe can grow both together, so can double
          that amount of bio oil, 1/2 from bacteria and 1/2 from algae over same
          area. and using same food, so then make 25,000 gallons/yr/acre?
          > Since algae only needs 1/10 of the sunlight per area maybe they can
          share it? if not maybe have double layer, top being the bacteria
          container that is clear and thin and another container of algae below it
          so so light can pass through the top container to the lower container?
          > I do not know but maybe someone here knows?
          > Either way looks like same/similar hardware setup.
          >
          >
          > --- On Tue, 3/1/11, Bruce Carroll Lendrum lendlabs@... wrote:
          >
          > From: Bruce Carroll Lendrum lendlabs@...
          > Subject: [oil_from_algae] it is Cyanobacteria Spirulna.. Blue gree
          alge that has been grown for food
          > To: oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Tuesday, March 1, 2011, 12:11 AM
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Bobby,
          > This is only a different name for cyanobacterium spirulina : to the
          average microbiology .. we are going to change naming soon..So it called
          both an Algae or bacteria,green
          > Algal research
          > G350/531 Rights Managed
          >
          > Caption: Algal research. Researchers tending growth tanks for the
          Spirulina blue-green alga (cyanobacterium, green). Extracts from
          Spirulina
          > are being studied for medical and health uses, which include protein
          > and energy drinks, skin gels and also anti-cancer properties.
          > Photographed at the French research company Alpha-Biotech, France.
          Sorry about that... From UC Burkley..Cyanobacteria: Life History and
          Ecology
          >
          >
          >
          > Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic.
          >
          > Though cyanobacteria do not have a great diversity of form, and though
          they
          > are microscopic, they are rich in chemical diversity. Cyanobacteria
          get their
          > name from the bluish pigment
          > phycocyanin,
          > which they use to capture light for photosynthesis. They also contain
          > chlorophyll a, the same photosynthetic pigment that
          > plants use. In
          > fact the chloroplast in plants is a symbiotic cyanobacterium, taken up
          by a
          > green algal ancestor of the plants sometime in the Precambrian.
          However,
          > not all "blue-green" bacteria are blue; some common forms are red or
          pink
          > from the pigment phycoerythrin. These bacteria are often found
          > growing on greenhouse glass, or around sinks and drains. The Red Sea
          gets
          > its name from occasional blooms of a reddish species of
          > Oscillatoria, and African flamingos get their pink color
          > from eating Spirulina.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Whatever their color, cyanobacteria are photosynthetic, and so can
          > manufacture their own food. This has caused them to be dubbed
          "blue-green
          > algae", though they have no relationship to any of the various
          eukayotic
          > algae. The term "algae" merely refers to any aquatic organisms
          capable of
          > photosynthesis, and so applies to several groups.
          >
          > Cyanobacteria are important in the nitrogen cycle.
          >
          > Cyanobacteria are very important organisms for the health and growth
          of
          > many plants.
          > They are one of very few groups of organisms that can convert
          > inert atmospheric nitrogen into an organic form, such as nitrate or
          > ammonia. It is these "fixed" forms of nitrogen which plants need
          > for their growth, and must obtain from the soil. Fertilizers work the
          way
          > they do in part because they contain additional fixed nitrogen which
          plants
          > can then absorb throough their roots.
          >
          > Nitrification cannot occur in the presence of oxygen, so nitrogen is
          fixed in
          > specialized cells called heterocysts. These cells have an especially
          > thickened wall that contains an anaerobic environment. You can see
          these
          > larger cells among the filaments of Nostoc, shown at right.
          >
          > Many plants, especially legumes, have formed symbiotic relations
          > with nitrifying bacteria, providing specialized tissues in their roots
          or stems
          > to house the bacteria, in return for organic nitrogen. This has been
          used to
          > great advantage in the cultivation of rice, where the floating fern
          > Azolla is actively distributed among the rice paddies. The
          > fern houses colonies of the cyanobacterium Anabaena in its
          > leaves, where it fixes nitrogen. The ferns then provide an
          inexpensive
          > natural fertilizer and nitrogen source for the rice plants when they
          die at the
          > end of the season.
          >
          > Cyanobacteria also form symbiotic relationships with many
          > fungi,
          > forming complex symbiotic "organisms" known as
          > lichens.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Nutritious or poisonous?
          >
          > The cyanobacterium Spirulina, shown at right, has long
          > been valued as a
          > food source; it is high in protein, and can be cultivated in ponds
          quite easily.
          > In tropical countries, it may be a very important part of the diet,
          and was
          > eaten regularly by the Aztecs; it is also served in several Oriental
          dishes. In
          > the US, the popularity of Spirulina is primarily as a "health
          > food", being sold in stores as a dried powder or in tablet form.
          >
          > Many other species of cyanobacteria produce populations that are toxic
          to
          > humans and animals. Blue-green pond scums have been linked to the
          poisoning of
          > cattle and dogs, and occasionally people. It is therefore not
          recommended that
          > wild populations be gathered and eaten without some knowledge of the
          organisms
          > involved.
          >
          > Cyanobacteria may cause other problems as well; a species of
          > Lyngbya is responsible for one of the skin irritations
          > commonly known as "swimmer's itch."
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com, Bobby Yates Emory liberty1@
          wrote:
          > >
          > > Maybe I should have said almost the same as algae.
          > >
          > > Bobby
          > >
          > > On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 2:19 AM, Bobby Yates Emory liberty1@...:
          > >
          > > > Dave,
          > > >
          > > > It is algae.
          > > >
          > > > Bobby
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > On Mon, Feb 28, 2011 at 4:17 AM, aliendave2525 aliendave2525@...:
          > > >
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >> Some news that was on yahoo.com home page today
          > > >> I guess algae has a new nemesis
          > > >>
          > > >> http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110227/ap_on_bi_ge/us_growing_fuel
          > > >>
          > > >> If this is true this is amazing!
          > > >>
          > > >> 15,000 gallons per acre per year
          > > >> $30 per barrel, $0.96 per gallon
          > > >>
          > > >> What you all think?
          > > >> Is there a catch or what?
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > --
          > > > Toward freedom,
          > > >
          > > > Bobby Yates Emory
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > --
          > > Toward freedom,
          > >
          > > Bobby Yates Emory
          > >
          >
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