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Algae Strain for Methane

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  • Qsurti
    Can anyone guide me to algae strains that have potential to produced either methane or methanol or ethanol. Also please guide me to the sites and companies who
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 1, 2010
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      Can anyone guide me to algae strains that have potential to produced either methane or methanol or ethanol.

      Also please guide me to the sites and companies who are developing technologies to bring such technologies to commercial fruition.
    • Bobby Yates Emory
      Qsurti, Butanol would be a better alcohol. One of our members is working on this. It is not ready for commercial deployment - but that is his objective.
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 2, 2010
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        Qsurti,

        Butanol would be a better alcohol.

        One of our members is working on this.  It is not ready for commercial deployment - but that is his objective.

        Methane has such low energy density it may not be ideal for transportation use.

        Bobby

        On Tue, Mar 2, 2010 at 5:42 AM, Qsurti <qsurti@...> wrote:
         

        Can anyone guide me to algae strains that have potential to produced either methane or methanol or ethanol.

        Also please guide me to the sites and companies who are developing technologies to bring such technologies to commercial fruition.




        --
        Toward freedom,

        Bobby Yates Emory
      • radha sudha
        Hi all, Can  anyone help me for algal screening and isolation. How to do this? I have mixture of strains from that how to isolate the particular strain.
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 2, 2010
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          Hi all,
          Can  anyone help me for algal screening and isolation. How to do this? I have mixture of strains from that how to isolate the particular strain. Kindly reply me            Radha


          The INTERNET now has a personality. YOURS! See your Yahoo! Homepage.
        • Mitchell Heldt
          For stationary uses, would you be able to make methane just by feeding the algae into an anaerobic digester like the ones used at some sewage plants to make
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 2, 2010
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            For stationary uses, would you be able to make methane just by feeding the algae into an anaerobic digester like the ones used at some sewage plants to make methane.  If that was feasible, would you want an algae with more or less oil?

          • Qsurti
            Your note brings in a new diamension to the algae production and its usefulness. Can algae be used in anaerobic digester to produce Methane? What strains of
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 3, 2010
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              Your note brings in a new diamension to the algae production and its usefulness.

              Can algae be used in anaerobic digester to produce Methane? What strains of algae should be used and if there is any member who has already tried this process, please do reply.

              Thanks,
              Quaid at carbonlessenergy@...

              --- In oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com, "Mitchell Heldt" <mitch@...> wrote:
              >
              > For stationary uses, would you be able to make methane just by feeding the
              > algae into an anaerobic digester like the ones used at some sewage plants to
              > make methane. If that was feasible, would you want an algae with more or
              > less oil?
              >
            • Mitchell Heldt
              Over twenty years ago, I took a tour of the sewage treatment plant in Ames, Iowa, USA. It is a small town of about fifty-six thousand people. Half of the
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 3, 2010
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                Over twenty years ago, I took a tour of the sewage treatment plant in Ames, Iowa, USA.   It is a small town of about fifty-six thousand people.  Half of the people are students at Iowa State University.  In 1987 the sewage plant produced methane in an anaerobic digester from all of the sewage.  There methane production covered all the energy needs for the sewage and related facility nine months out of the year.   They also had methane powered generators.  However, the students produced so much sewage that when they went on summer vacation, the stockpiles quickly diminished and they would have to switch to grid power until the students came back.

                 

                If the added sugars and lipids from growing algae in sewage and sunlight were added, I was thinking that the amount of methane produced from digesting would be greatly enhanced and could be done without developing new strains of algae.

                 

                There are also a large number of turkey, chicken, beef, and pig farms just north of town as well as a huge pasta factory there.  Would eggshells mixed with chicken feces increase production?

                Thanks for reading

                Mitch

              • jim.richards65
                Quaid, You can use any bio-mass to achieve the 30:1 carbon to nitrogen ratio to best promote the fastest biological production of methane, in my view whatever
                Message 7 of 8 , Mar 3, 2010
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                  Quaid,

                  You can use any bio-mass to achieve the 30:1 carbon to nitrogen ratio to best promote the fastest biological production of methane, in my view whatever your fastest growing indigenous algae would probably be best. Algae has a low carbon to nitrogen ratio (around 6:1) so would have to mixed with some high carbon biomass.

                  METHANE:
                  The math and chemistry for the biological production of methane is fairly well laid out in John Fry's book, he lays out not only ways to mix different types of bio-mass to achieve the 30:1 carbon to nitrogen ratio. He also details the energy conversion of methane to heat and shaft horse-power, along with the problem involved with compressing the gas for storage.

                  John Fry (Book) free
                  http://www.cd3wd.com/CD3WD_40/JF/432/Methane%20Power%20Plants%20-%20L.%20John%20Fry%201973-74.pdf

                  Jean Pain took a different "All vegetation" approach that has some interesting ideas.
                  Jean Pain (book) free
                  http://www.biomeiler.at/explorer/Downloads/AnotherKindofGarden.pdf
                  Videos
                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHRvwNJRNag&feature=player_embedded
                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGCj7NA0OIs&feature=related

                  Both these processes are fairly old and have strengths and weaknesses, these two free books answer a lot of questions.

                  Patent for a real simple gas scrubbing method, far simpler than John Fry's lime and iron process.
                  http://www.google.com/patents/about?id=ByYIAAAAEBAJ&dq=6291232

                  Good luck,

                  Curbie
                • Steve Spence
                  The algae would get digested as a raw material. Methane is produced by bacteria. Steve Spence Renewable energy and self sufficiency http://www.green-trust.org
                  Message 8 of 8 , Mar 3, 2010
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                    The algae would get digested as a raw material. Methane is produced by
                    bacteria.

                    Steve Spence
                    Renewable energy and self sufficiency
                    http://www.green-trust.org
                    http://makingthewebwork.blogspot.com/




                    Qsurti wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Your note brings in a new diamension to the algae production and its
                    > usefulness.
                    >
                    > Can algae be used in anaerobic digester to produce Methane? What strains
                    > of algae should be used and if there is any member who has already tried
                    > this process, please do reply.
                    >
                    > Thanks,
                    > Quaid at carbonlessenergy@... <mailto:carbonlessenergy%40gmail.com>
                    >
                    > --- In oil_from_algae@yahoogroups.com
                    > <mailto:oil_from_algae%40yahoogroups.com>, "Mitchell Heldt" <mitch@...>
                    > wrote:
                    >>
                    >> For stationary uses, would you be able to make methane just by feeding the
                    >> algae into an anaerobic digester like the ones used at some sewage
                    > plants to
                    >> make methane. If that was feasible, would you want an algae with more or
                    >> less oil?
                    >>
                    >
                    >
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